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2017 USA Mountainbiking Tour From The UK

Discussion in 'Cross Country, All Mountain & Trail Riding' started by Madmountainman, Sep 22, 2016.

  1. Madmountainman

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    Hi Folks,

    Just signed up and not too sure which section of the forum to post this in, but my preferred riding is out on natural trails, exploring the hills, so i've plonked it in here.
    I'm based in the UK, aged 50, and am planning a mountain biking tour of the USA for late August next year. I'm very much an old school rider, still riding the iconic Mountaincycle San Andreas. However, i'm fancying getting myself up to date with the technology, for my trip, and have been chatting to Thomas at Guerrilla Gravity.
    The plan is to fly into Denver and pick up a nice, shiny new Trail Pistol and start exploring the local trails. I'm then looking at heading over to Crested Butte and then up through The Rockies, heading on up to Yosemite. From there, it's West to Tahoe and then down to San Francisco, through to Mammoth and Sequoia. After that it's Grand Canyon and Moab and then back to Denver.
    Dependant on flight costs, I may have to start in San Francisco and get the new bike expedited over to me and then do the route anti-clockwise.
    What i'm after is some help and advice on aspects of my travel itinerary.
    Given my planned areas to visit, would you please recommend what trails I should really be looking to ride?
    Given my planned time of travel - looking at around two months - is late August a good time to start? I would like to avoid the US summer holidays, but catch some great riding weather in the more northern areas, and hopefully arriving in the desert regions when the temperature's a bit more manageable.
    Finally, given my age and a growing tendency to look after my ageing bones, is there anyone out there that wouldn't mind accompanying me on a ride or two and showing me round a bit, so I can avoid looking at maps all day and getting lost, ride nice trails that won't kill or break me? We have bike parks in the UK, but I prefer to ride our natural trails for most of my riding, but do enjoy the odd romp round a man made trail.
    I've signed up to a couple of websites that I can download gpx files for my phone, where i'm looking at using Viewranger to help me find my way round. Has anyone used this app and do you recommend it, or is there something else out there that's better?

    That's it for now folks, looking forward to some helpful advice and getting over to you next summer.

    Cheers

    Rich
     

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  2. johnbryanpeters

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    Have fun!
     
  3. Kevin

    Kevin Turbo Monkey

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    I have no advice for you but im very jelous.
    Welcome to ridemonkey.
     
  4. kidwoo

    kidwoo Celebrating No-Pants Day

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    Look up these trails/areas in and around california:

    Canal Plunge/Kernville
    Downieville
    Rim trail at lake tahoe (it's a huge circumnavigating series of trails that's over 100 miles, lots of good loops using it)
    Mills Peak in Graegle (not my favorite but my favorite in the area might kill you)
    Bass Lake/ 007 trail

    If you're picking your bike up midsummer, don't discount the colorado riding. It's awesome:

    Monarch Crest/Salida
    Various options of the colorado trail (starting at keystone is a good one)
    Mt Elbert if you want a big, high elevation one

    Moab has a little of everything, very moderate graded pedal-heavy trails to wheel breaking abusive fast descents. All of it has incredible scenery. Don't skip arches national park while you're there.


    As you look these places up, pay attention to the time of year you'll be there. The high elevation stuff may have snow on it, and the low elevation stuff may be hot as hell. Time your visits accordingly.

    Using an app like trailforks or mtbproject will give you good directions and what to expect in terms of physical commitment with distances, vert climbed etc.

    You'll meet a guy named matt at Guerilla Gravity. He likes it when you grab his testicles. It's kind of a secret handshake that immediately gets you %15 off the cost of a bike. With love of course, you can't hurt him. Kind of a local yank thing. Pun intended.
     
    #4 -   Sep 22, 2016
    Last edited: Sep 22, 2016
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  5. Madmountainman

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    Thank you, that's some great info there, which'll help with my trip planning. I'm planning to ride the Colorado area and, although i'm coming for the trails and scenery, i'm also incorporating some sightseeing, as riding every day will probably kill me as well, so i'm looking for a nice balance between the two. Looking at spending between a week and a fortnight in my specific areas, hopefully making use of Airbnb for my stop overs. Just need to find a suitable hire vehicle for my 6' 6" 235lb frame. Oh, and I forgot to mention Yellowstone on my route as well.
     
    #5 -   Sep 23, 2016
    Last edited: Sep 24, 2016
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