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8020 frame jig build

sikocycles

Turbo Monkey
Feb 14, 2002
1,285
332
CT
I may have BFS bend them or buy a cobra toob bender. Not sure yet.

I am not on social media so can see the IG post
 
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buckoW

Turbo Monkey
Mar 1, 2007
2,070
1,182
Champery, Switzerland
I may have BFS bend them or buy a cobra toob bender. Not sure yet.

I am not on social media so can see the IG post
Just an interesting tube notching setup.
Oh.... Cobra bender.... Hell yeah! Any cool tube mitering jigs you are considering? Once you are setup it’s going to be so nice going from one process to another and be a pleasure to use these fine tools.

9FA3A256-8902-45F3-8CB4-FB1CFC386179.jpeg



A buddy is building me a steel front triangle currently that I will mate to a carbon rear end from a Scott Gambler. I had to give up the hunt for a 49mm or 44/56mm headtube because I couldn’t find one. I guess I’ll have to run a zs44/ec44 headset and won’t have any adjustability up front. If you have any sources for a cromo 49mm or 44/56mm headtube or piece of cromo tubing I could turn down.
We did try turning down some stainless tube into a headtube but I wasn’t comfortable with a stainless headtube because I thought it might be too soft? Are you going to go with 44mm? That looks to be the only option I can get my hands on around here.

97693703-FB1B-43D2-81B6-63B373A0DB5B.jpeg
 
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HardtailHack

used an iron once
Jan 20, 2009
2,934
674
Just an interesting tube notching setup.
Oh.... Cobra bender.... Hell yeah! Any cool tube mitering jigs you are considering? Once you are setup it’s going to be so nice going from one process to another and be a pleasure to use these fine tools.

View attachment 159766


A buddy is building me a steel front triangle currently that I will mate to a carbon rear end from a Scott Gambler. I had to give up the hunt for a 49mm or 44/56mm headtube because I couldn’t find one. I guess I’ll have to run a zs44/ec44 headset and won’t have any adjustability up front. If you have any sources for a cromo 49mm or 44/56mm headtube or piece of cromo tubing I could turn down.
We did try turning down some stainless tube into a headtube but I wasn’t comfortable with a stainless headtube because I thought it might be too soft? Are you going to go with 44mm? That looks to be the only option I can get my hands on around here.

View attachment 159768
My last HT had a stainless BB and I think the guys at BTR are using stainless filler wire on all of their frames.
Also, Reynolds has has a stainless tubeset that almost rivals Titanium for finished weight/strength.
 

sikocycles

Turbo Monkey
Feb 14, 2002
1,285
332
CT
Will do a 44mm Headtube.
as for miter jigs I may get the cobra miter daddy and make something.
saw one at firefly that looks good and pretty easy to make.
 

buckoW

Turbo Monkey
Mar 1, 2007
2,070
1,182
Champery, Switzerland
Keep looking for a Bridgeport but too expensive right now.
I have been casually searching for a Bridgeport too. Which ones are you looking at?

When do we get to see your frame taking shape?

My buddy is almost done with my enduro geometry steel front triangle. I need to bring him a shock so we can finish the lower shock mount. Pretty pumped. He used to build motorcycles but returned to bikes recently. 78* sta, 63* ha.

11028044-2B10-48F4-88D6-CABA1177A958.jpeg


I still want to do my carpet fiber cut and paste project to compare. I think it could be interesting.

1915A999-8909-43D4-8018-203A6B89F72D.jpeg
 
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dump

Turbo Monkey
Oct 12, 2001
6,375
1,358
Part of the reason that Bridgeports are so scarce is that every tinkerer with a few coins in their pocket thinks this is what they need to do x. Then the acquired Bridgeports mostly proceed in being the biggest, most expensive clothes rack in the shop shop rather than a tool that actually gets used.

An observation from the past 10 years.
 
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Adventurous

Starshine Bro
Mar 19, 2014
6,661
3,898
Crawlorado
There seem to be a decent number of Bridgeports around these parts, fairly reasonably priced too. I've seen them anywhere from $1,200+, depending upon whether they come with vises, digital readouts, etc...
 

sikocycles

Turbo Monkey
Feb 14, 2002
1,285
332
CT
I seeing clapped out Brideports near me starting at $2500 and funny thing is I grew up in Bridgeport and live very close still.
I see nice ones for around $4500
 

Westy

the teste
Nov 22, 2002
43,252
9,022
Sleazattle
Part of the reason that Bridgeports are so scarce is that every tinkerer with a few coins in their pocket thinks this is what they need to do x. Then the acquired Bridgeports mostly proceed in being the biggest, most expensive clothes rack in the shop shop rather than a tool that actually gets used.

An observation from the past 10 years.
People also buy $1500 clapped out Bridgeports with tons of backlash, loose ways and roached spindle bearings. Their first few parts come out looking like a dog chewed on it and kind of give up.

I've considered one in the past but always accepted the fact one I could afford would require some rebuilding.
 

dump

Turbo Monkey
Oct 12, 2001
6,375
1,358
People also buy $1500 clapped out Bridgeports with tons of backlash, loose ways and roached spindle bearings. Their first few parts come out looking like a dog chewed on it and kind of give up.

I've considered one in the past but always accepted the fact one I could afford would require some rebuilding.
rebuilding the clapped out one would require yet another Bridgeport... and so the cycle continues :)

but yeah, for many people’s needs a cheaper, smaller Asian mill would probably do the trick.

want to notch some tubes? Here’s a hand file.
 

dump

Turbo Monkey
Oct 12, 2001
6,375
1,358
There seem to be a decent number of Bridgeports around these parts, fairly reasonably priced too. I've seen them anywhere from $1,200+, depending upon whether they come with vises, digital readouts, etc...
i would be very afraid of a Bridgeport that’s less than 5k.
 

Westy

the teste
Nov 22, 2002
43,252
9,022
Sleazattle
rebuilding the clapped out one would require yet another Bridgeport... and so the cycle continues :)

but yeah, for many people’s needs a cheaper, smaller Asian mill would probably do the trick.

want to notch some tubes? Here’s a hand file.


If the ways are trashed you need a machine much better than a Bridgeport to regrind. It can be done by hand to a certain extent with scrapers, straight edges, time and massive forearms.

Bearings, screws and most other stuff can just be rebuilt by hand. A proper professional rebuild will cost 5 figures.
 

englertracing

you owe me a sandwich
Mar 5, 2012
858
472
La Verne
People also buy $1500 clapped out Bridgeports with tons of backlash, loose ways and roached spindle bearings. Their first few parts come out looking like a dog chewed on it and kind of give up.

I've considered one in the past but always accepted the fact one I could afford would require some rebuilding.
you need to find an old retired friend who has had one in their home shop since new.
I have two of those friends, and one sold me his when he became ill.
 

englertracing

you owe me a sandwich
Mar 5, 2012
858
472
La Verne
Part of the reason that Bridgeports are so scarce is that every tinkerer with a few coins in their pocket thinks this is what they need to do x. Then the acquired Bridgeports mostly proceed in being the biggest, most expensive clothes rack in the shop shop rather than a tool that actually gets used.

An observation from the past 10 years.
my Bridgeport is consistently surrounded by aluminum chips
would make a horrible clothing rack unless you like pockets full of chips
 

englertracing

you owe me a sandwich
Mar 5, 2012
858
472
La Verne
Hows the other guy doing? Still in good health?

Asking for a friend.
well yes and no,
he was a big time mold maker from the end of the manual era a "MILL MASTER"
he had a stroke before i met him actually that retired him (one handed) but he consistently does large projects and still uses his mill one handed for all sorts of things,
getting his mill away from him would be damned near impossible.
 

englertracing

you owe me a sandwich
Mar 5, 2012
858
472
La Verne
I have been casually searching for a Bridgeport too. Which ones are you looking at?

When do we get to see your frame taking shape?

My buddy is almost done with my enduro geometry steel front triangle. I need to bring him a shock so we can finish the lower shock mount. Pretty pumped. He used to build motorcycles but returned to bikes recently. 78* sta, 63* ha.

View attachment 159902

I still want to do my carpet fiber cut and paste project to compare. I think it could be interesting.

View attachment 159901
what wall thickness is this tubing?
is it butted?
looks fun
 

Adventurous

Starshine Bro
Mar 19, 2014
6,661
3,898
Crawlorado
well yes and no,
he was a big time mold maker from the end of the manual era a "MILL MASTER"
he had a stroke before i met him actually that retired him (one handed) but he consistently does large projects and still uses his mill one handed for all sorts of things,
getting his mill away from him would be damned near impossible.
It'll be a shame when guys of that era die out. I'm always amazed to see the guys and machines that built the infrastructure of yesteryear.
 

Westy

the teste
Nov 22, 2002
43,252
9,022
Sleazattle
well yes and no,
he was a big time mold maker from the end of the manual era a "MILL MASTER"
he had a stroke before i met him actually that retired him (one handed) but he consistently does large projects and still uses his mill one handed for all sorts of things,
getting his mill away from him would be damned near impossible.

I used to work in the CNC industry and back in the late 90s spent a few months in Brazil working in a large installation at a Ford plant. On days I had no work to do I would go see other customers in the country. Went to a Krupps plant in the middle of the Amazon that had a bunch of really nice modern EDM and CNC machines for mold making. But they also had a bunch of shit from the 1950s and still made some of their molds the old school way. Lots of sheet metal profile and wooden templates on hydraulic copy mills and hand grinding/finishing. I was fascinated by the process. As cool as it was a modern machined die is so much more accurate than the old school stuff.
 

dump

Turbo Monkey
Oct 12, 2001
6,375
1,358
you need to find an old retired friend who has had one in their home shop since new.
I have two of those friends, and one sold me his when he became ill.
that’s a bit macabre
my Bridgeport is consistently surrounded by aluminum chips
would make a horrible clothing rack unless you like pockets full of chips
That's great. I'm also clearly not referring to you! ;)