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A Trust.

Avy

Monkey
Jan 24, 2006
675
230
Hey all,I think it is Stoney that is the Monies Man? I need to get a Trust and am open to All of you’re thoughts. My Wife’s Father went to one of those seminars where you pay 600 dollars or whatever. It did very well for us. I see them online though I have Never googled the matter as of yet. Nor have I spoke to my StepFather yet. The Wife is worried and so am I. It is expensive and I do not know how I will get it,but this is my start. Thank You.

Avy
 

junkyard

You might feel a little prick.
Sep 1, 2015
2,199
1,699
San Diego
Maybe a trust isn’t want you need, but maybe it is. What you need is an attorney. Probably a will and trust attorney. Sucks I know.
 

junkyard

You might feel a little prick.
Sep 1, 2015
2,199
1,699
San Diego
Why Both Brother?

Avy
Well shit i didn’t know I was getting tested. You only need a will for small shit and trust can leave stuff to your kids with other people in charge. You can dictate how your grandkids get their inheritance. So it can be super complicated if your shit is complicated. Trusts also have tax benefits as well. I remember that over 250k gotta have a bank account in your trusts name or straight to probate court. So gotta split it up in different accounts. Avoid probate court at all costs if you can, it’s the main reason for this stuff and I bet it’s taxes.

But remember I did all this years ago and in Cali so maybe other states differ.
 

OGRipper

back alley ripper
Feb 3, 2004
10,459
900
NORCAL is the hizzle
Yeah, talk to a lawyer. Even better, talk to more than one until you find one you're comfortable with.

Without a will your estate will go to your heirs in the order or priority established by state law. It's called "intestate succession" and can work ok if you agree with the order of succession, but your heirs will need to have it all confirmed through a process known as probate, which can be expensive and time consuming, especially if anyone wants to challenge it. (Also, it's tough to think about, but if for example you and your wife or other heirs die at the same time, like in an accident, your assets might not go where you want them to go.) With a will you can make sure your stuff goes where you want it to go, but your heirs will still need to go through probate to confirm the transfer of assets. A trust will help avoid all of that and although more expensive up front, will probably save your estate some money (and certainly some hassle) in the long run.

This stuff is hard to deal with but think of handling it in advance as a gift to your heirs. I can tell you from personal experience that leaving unsettled affairs can create a lot of drama and stress during a time that may already be pretty difficult. You can help avoid some of that by taking it on yourself while you're still around.
 

Avy

Monkey
Jan 24, 2006
675
230
Yeah, talk to a lawyer. Even better, talk to more than one until you find one you're comfortable with.

Without a will your estate will go to your heirs in the order or priority established by state law. It's called "intestate succession" and can work ok if you agree with the order of succession, but your heirs will need to have it all confirmed through a process known as probate, which can be expensive and time consuming, especially if anyone wants to challenge it. (Also, it's tough to think about, but if for example you and your wife or other heirs die at the same time, like in an accident, your assets might not go where you want them to go.) With a will you can make sure your stuff goes where you want it to go, but your heirs will still need to go through probate to confirm the transfer of assets. A trust will help avoid all of that and although more expensive up front, will probably save your estate some money (and certainly some hassle) in the long run.

This stuff is hard to deal with but think of handling it in advance as a gift to your heirs. I can tell you from personal experience that leaving unsettled affairs can create a lot of drama and stress during a time that may already be pretty difficult. You can help avoid some of that by taking it on yourself while you're still around.
Thank You Brother. One thing I was wondering was How to obtain the list of Lawyers? My CPA,my Parents of course. I did not want to do it online due to being Hit with all that comes with it. I was thinking the good old phone book? Thought’s?

Avy
 

OGRipper

back alley ripper
Feb 3, 2004
10,459
900
NORCAL is the hizzle
Thank You Brother. One thing I was wondering was How to obtain the list of Lawyers? My CPA,my Parents of course. I did not want to do it online due to being Hit with all that comes with it. I was thinking the good old phone book? Thought’s?

Avy
Parents and CPA are a good start. Also friends, anyone who knows any lawyer. Even if they don’t know a trusts and estates lawyer, most lawyers with at least some experience can usually provide a referral to an expert, and it’s usually better to have some personal connection, even if there are degrees of separation.
 

jdcamb

Tool Time!
Feb 17, 2002
18,896
6,949
Nowhere Man!
Yeah, talk to a lawyer. Even better, talk to more than one until you find one you're comfortable with.

Without a will your estate will go to your heirs in the order or priority established by state law. It's called "intestate succession" and can work ok if you agree with the order of succession, but your heirs will need to have it all confirmed through a process known as probate, which can be expensive and time consuming, especially if anyone wants to challenge it. (Also, it's tough to think about, but if for example you and your wife or other heirs die at the same time, like in an accident, your assets might not go where you want them to go.) With a will you can make sure your stuff goes where you want it to go, but your heirs will still need to go through probate to confirm the transfer of assets. A trust will help avoid all of that and although more expensive up front, will probably save your estate some money (and certainly some hassle) in the long run.

This stuff is hard to deal with but think of handling it in advance as a gift to your heirs. I can tell you from personal experience that leaving unsettled affairs can create a lot of drama and stress during a time that may already be pretty difficult. You can help avoid some of that by taking it on yourself while you're still around.
This is some pretty strong advice.
 

jdcamb

Tool Time!
Feb 17, 2002
18,896
6,949
Nowhere Man!
Probate is administered arbitrarily in most Jurisdictions nationally. A properly administered Will is never challenged. Nobody is ever of right sound and mind. Grudges are often hard to overcome. Always...
 

Avy

Monkey
Jan 24, 2006
675
230
Probate is administered arbitrarily in most Jurisdictions nationally. A properly administered Will is never challenged. Nobody is ever of right sound and mind. Grudges are often hard to overcome. Always...
Well,I have found one,waiting to speak with him. Any question’s that you feel I must ask? I am aware I must have a good Gut feeling,but thought I would ask. I am going to have my questions written down so I don’t stray.

Avy
 

jdcamb

Tool Time!
Feb 17, 2002
18,896
6,949
Nowhere Man!
Well,I have found one,waiting to speak with him. Any question’s that you feel I must ask? I am aware I must have a good Gut feeling,but thought I would ask. I am going to have my questions written down so I don’t stray.

Avy
Ask him or her if they know Westy. If they do. Move on. The white courtesy phone is bugged also. Have him or her read through your will in your presence. That will determine if the Legal Secretary who actually wrote it made any mistakes in the execution. Wills are pretty cut and dry and usually in form status and hard to fuck up.
 

Avy

Monkey
Jan 24, 2006
675
230
I thought that this is what the thread was going to be about from the title. I like the idea of a linkage fork, just not that one.
Oh that’s right,if memory serves me,you want that old school K2 linkage Fork. The Ultimate DC 4” Fork. Only not the same as it had problems,you know,better.

Avy