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All mountian bike

jim_bob

Chimp
Jul 22, 2010
13
0
Georgia
Hey everyone,
Im looking to get more into mountian biking. Ive been using my dads GT timberline wich is kind of a crossover between road and mountian biking. I want something that i can do hard trails on and maybee even some of the downhill stuff eventually. I assume I am discribing the bikes named ALL MOUNTIAN? Im looking for one that wont break the bank, here are a few that I have found and like.

These are both by specialized,
http://www.specialized.com/us/en/bc/...enuItemId=9249
http://www.specialized.com/us/en/bc/...enuItemId=9249
Any suggestions? Thanks!
P.S. figured this post might be better suited here.
 

Sandwich

Pig my fish!
Staff member
May 23, 2002
21,386
6,465
borcester rhymes
Hey dude, welcome to ridemonkey. You'll find a lot of knowledgeable people and jacka$$es, but it's all in fun.

While both of those bikes are nice, I would suggest something a little less serious for a first bike. There is a huge difference between an AM bike and a hybrid timberline. I think what would end up happening is you'd spend 90% of your time lugging around a big heavy bike, but get some real kicks in 10% of the time. In other words, get a lighter, shorter travel bike that can do a little bit of everything, and you'll be better off.

If you like specialized, I would check out the FSR XC or Stumpjumper. Those are both bikes with a bit more moderate travel. They can handle any rough trail, and while they aren't well suited for pure DH, they can handle an average trail, and may be OK for some very beginner-friendly lift days.

If you really want a bigger travel bike, both of those are good, with the pitch leaning more towards DH trail and the Enduro leaning more towards everything. If you go with either of those, I don't think you'll be disappointed, but unless you're doing regular lift days combined with trail riding, you probably won't need the travel or strength.

I know for me, I was always convinced I needed a big travel bike....eventually I finally got a DH bike, and have since purchased a Trek Fuel EX9 for trail riding. I find that 5" is plenty, and I could probably even get away with less. Before I was on a 6" travel bike and wanted even more than that....but it just gets in the way and adds weight.

If you're looking for other suggestions, I'd throw out the Trek Fuel EX series, or a Remedy if you really want the long travel option. Giant also has their Trance and Reign series, which are trail and AM respectively. All of these are great bikes and give you a huge amount of bang for your buck.
 

jim_bob

Chimp
Jul 22, 2010
13
0
Georgia
Thanks man,
So would these not be good to start getting serious on? Ive been riding a little over a year now and want to get serious. Im just looking for something that I can ride the technical and downhill stuff but also trails.
 

Sandwich

Pig my fish!
Staff member
May 23, 2002
21,386
6,465
borcester rhymes
They're both rad bikes and they can certainly hold up to abuse. You can both ride them downhill at a good clip too. The pitch was actually picked as a "best of" by bikeradar.

http://bike-mode.blogspot.com/2009/01/avanti.html http://static.bikeradar.com/gear/category/bikes/mountain/product/pitch-pro-09-33625

My opinion is just that buying a 5" travel "XC" or "Trail" bike might be more useful than either of those in every day situations...but those are both great for "do everything" (hence the all mountain term) sleds.
 

Sandwich

Pig my fish!
Staff member
May 23, 2002
21,386
6,465
borcester rhymes
Yup, or this one: Stumpjumper
which is a little higher end.

The difference between the Stumpy/FSRXC and Enduro/Pitch is that the Enduro is going to be more down than up, reinforced tubes, slacked out geometry, whereas the stumpy/FSR are going to be a little tighter, a little lighter, and a bit more nimble. If you actually think you'll be riding this bike at lift assisted mountains, then I'd opt for the pitch or enduro, but if you'll be riding up in order to go down, the Stumpy should hold up to much abuse. Either way they are both great bikes, it just comes down to a decision of whether you want to carry around a few extra pounds for added strength when it comes to jumps and drops.
 

NorseManiac

Monkey
Mar 15, 2006
492
0
The North Shore, MA
My buddy just started riding and bought the Pitch and absolutely loves it. Climbs & descends well. If you are gonna ride trail more get the more trail bike like others have said, it will be more enjoyable.
 

jim_bob

Chimp
Jul 22, 2010
13
0
Georgia
but would the fsr be able to do a bit of everything? it looks like itd be more affordable. And isnt the specialized pitch suspension ajustable?