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Brakes - replacement parts vs buying new set

Every time I go to repair my brakes (Hayes HFX), I wind up dropping something on the order of $50- on parts - a hose, a lever, a master cylinder...

I'm thinking about just ordering a new set, which would set me back something between $120 and $200 for a front and rear set with 203 mm rotors depending on whether I troll eBay or try to keep one retailer or another in business.

Buying a set means I have the parts when I need them at a lower cost over time...

Comments on the idea or where to buy?
 

HAB

Chelsea from Seattle
Apr 28, 2007
10,609
917
Seattle
LordOpie said:
I'm so bored at work.
And I'm quite enjoying being at home. I'm off until next wed.

I'd just get some new brakes. HFX9s aren't very reliable, and don't work all that well either. Someone (Jenson?) had LX calipers and rotors for $25. Levers can be had for $60 or so, and throw in some hoses, and you've got yourself a very good $100 upgrade.
 

BurlyShirley

Rex Grossman Will Rise Again
Jul 4, 2002
19,183
1
TN
Yeah, I have to recommend the LX hydros since they've been brought up. They faded a bit on me when I went out west, but on the east coast, they are PLENTY of brake on the cheap IMO. I actually have a set of extra levers for some lying around I think.

:brows:
 

DHS

Friendly Neighborhood Pool Boy
Apr 23, 2002
5,101
0
Sand, CA
And I'm quite enjoying being at home. I'm off until next wed.

I'd just get some new brakes. HFX9s aren't very reliable, and don't work all that well either. Someone (Jenson?) had LX calipers and rotors for $25. Levers can be had for $60 or so, and throw in some hoses, and you've got yourself a very good $100 upgrade.
yes. go to shimano. much easier to bleed then hayes. i have since gone complete to shimano. now own 4 different sets. and i've had everything else in the past. and everything else cost more to maintain
 

Spero

ass rainbow
Jul 12, 2005
2,072
0
Tejas
If you're ready to spend the 200 bones on a new set, you might consider going with a set of mags or juicy sevens for around 250.
 

HAB

Chelsea from Seattle
Apr 28, 2007
10,609
917
Seattle
yes. go to shimano. much easier to bleed then hayes. i have since gone complete to shimano. now own 4 different sets. and i've had everything else in the past. and everything else cost more to maintain
Yeah, they're incredibly reliable. I've got a pair of 6 year old Deores that I've had to bleed once. Other than that, all I've done is replaced the pads as needed. They're good brakes too. Yeah, they're cheap, and are Shimano's lowest end hydro, but for everything short of full on DH, they're very good. I think they're finally on the way out though.
 

in the trees

Turbo Monkey
May 19, 2003
1,210
1
NH
I switched from Hayes to Shimano in the Fall of '06 and I've been vey happy with the change. I'm running Saint calipers with Deore levers. No problems, easy bleed, and priced cheap thru on-line vendors.

toby

:spam: - I have a spare (new) Saint caliper in you're in need.
 
Thanks for the info.

I have been running the HFX since 2002 and have found them to be reliable and easy to maintain. The only work I have had to do has been replacing pads and repairing crash damage (levers, master cylinder, kinked hose, whatever). I find them easy to bleed, and have only had the need to do so when replacing components.

I went to Hayes from Magura since I absolutely detest shimming as a means of adjusting calipers; The last time I looked at Shimano brakes (XTR) they required shims.

At this point, I'm not inclined to switch brands.
 

JRogers

talks too much
Mar 19, 2002
3,791
1
Claremont, CA
Shimano or Avid, I'd say. Juicy 7s can be found lots of places for cheap. I got mine on ebay for probably around 200. I have two sets and no problems yet.
 

jdcamb

Tool Time!
Feb 17, 2002
16,149
3,360
Nowhere Man!
Thanks for the info.

I have been running the HFX since 2002 and have found them to be reliable and easy to maintain. The only work I have had to do has been replacing pads and repairing crash damage (levers, master cylinder, kinked hose, whatever). I find them easy to bleed, and have only had the need to do so when replacing components.

I went to Hayes from Magura since I absolutely detest shimming as a means of adjusting calipers; The last time I looked at Shimano brakes (XTR) they required shims.

At this point, I'm not inclined to switch brands.
As a mechanic I hate dicking around with Hayes Brakes. The small parts and seals are of marginal quality IMO. I believe they have some quality control problems. Sometimes they work fine. Sometimes they suck. That said the new Shimano XT's don't require shims.
 
As a mechanic I hate dicking around with Hayes Brakes. The small parts and seals are of marginal quality IMO. I believe they have some quality control problems. Sometimes they work fine. Sometimes they suck. That said the new Shimano XT's don't require shims.
So going by current price on Speedgoat, I would be going from a $200- investment in spare parts to $450- for front & rear brake kit that might or might not work with my 6" rear / 8" front rotor setup without even considering issues like hubs that don't take the centerlock rotors and - I don't wind up with the spares I was after in the first place.

Seems to have gotten rather far from the original stated goal.
 

jdcamb

Tool Time!
Feb 17, 2002
16,149
3,360
Nowhere Man!
So going by current price on Speedgoat, I would be going from a $200- investment in spare parts to $450- for front & rear brake kit that might or might not work with my 6" rear / 8" front rotor setup without even considering issues like hubs that don't take the centerlock rotors and - I don't wind up with the spares I was after in the first place.

Seems to have gotten rather far from the original stated goal.
To me good brakes (or breaks :biggrin: ) are not something I skimp on (I don't pay full price..). Since shimano sells everything seperate you can just buy what you need. Centerlock is only an option. Standard 6 bolt rotors are available. I think the same adapter that you currently run with the hayes will work with the shimano caliper up front. So you only need to buy the levers, some hoses/juice, and the calipers. You can keep using the same rotors and hubs. Sorry to deviate....
 

HAB

Chelsea from Seattle
Apr 28, 2007
10,609
917
Seattle
So going by current price on Speedgoat, I would be going from a $200- investment in spare parts to $450- for front & rear brake kit that might or might not work with my 6" rear / 8" front rotor setup without even considering issues like hubs that don't take the centerlock rotors and - I don't wind up with the spares I was after in the first place.

Seems to have gotten rather far from the original stated goal.
See my first post. The LXs I suggested do not require shims. They don't cost $450 for a set. They're better than HFX9s or Mags. I think my suggestion fits your original goal nicely.
 

jaydee

Monkey
Jul 5, 2001
794
0
Victoria BC
I broke a piston post on one of my Hayes Nines, and it was easier to get new brakes than find a part. So I got Juicy 7s and they're much nicer.
 

DHS

Friendly Neighborhood Pool Boy
Apr 23, 2002
5,101
0
Sand, CA
Or just buy some Juicy 7s. I have three or four(if you count the wife's bike) sets and have never had the slightest problem.
yea. juicy's do feel nice. but shimanos are still much easier to bleed and maintain. don't need much of anything for the bleed. a hose and something to drip into.

juicy's you NEED to use their kit. and definitely not everyone can bleed them. too many stupid steps. but do it a couple times and it is easy.
 

sanjuro

Tube Smuggler
Sep 13, 2004
17,412
0
SF
Since you already ordered the master cylinder for your Hayes brake, have you noticed how much plastic in the lever?

Compare it to, lets say, a XT or an Avid lever. Notice how there is very little plastic in those levers?