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Brought My New Baby Home

bitingback

Turbo Monkey
Ok...i know it's been awhile...but i had to share the good news with those that still know me over here...















:biggrin:








I took it for a quick ride around the block...however i couldn't take my focus off my fingers feeling frostbitten to enjoy the new experience. i think it took 20 minutes just to thaw out. can't wait to get to Texas but until then I guess i'll have to wait for spring. :(

on a side note...gotta love the kids. my son was inspecting the new bike and began ROTFL at how my bike seat "had a butt crack" in it. :oops: :lol:
 

stinkyboy

Plastic Santa
Jan 6, 2005
15,192
0
¡Phoenix!
The two biggest morons on the web have posted in the same thread. The circle is complete. The internet should now implode in 5, 4, 3...
 

LordOpie

MOTHER HEN
Oct 17, 2002
21,033
1
Denver
so in my absence you've become soft and slipping? :shocked:
Not at all. I'm still an ass, just more subtle.

For example, I congrat you on your first bike implying that you've been posting a bike forum for years without actually riding. What's with that?

Then I thank the lord that you didn't birth more of you.

Then I was mean to Loco indirectly and directly to Rob, but that's part of the forum rules.
 

robdamanii

OMG! <3 Tom Brady!
May 2, 2005
10,681
0
Out of my mind, back in a moment.
Not at all. I'm still an ass, just more subtle.

For example, I congrat you on your first bike implying that you've been posting a bike forum for years without actually riding. What's with that?

Then I thank the lord that you didn't birth more of you.

Then I was mean to Loco indirectly and directly to Rob, but that's part of the forum rules.
I :heart: you too Opie. You're not going soft. You're just going to be a daddy, so you have to keep it in check.
 

bitingback

Turbo Monkey
Not at all. I'm still an ass, just more subtle.

For example, I congrat you on your first bike implying that you've been posting a bike forum for years without actually riding. What's with that?

Then I thank the lord that you didn't birth more of you.

Then I was mean to Loco indirectly and directly to Rob, but that's part of the forum rules.
thanks for the quick recap...it was hard to keep up. :rofl:
 

sunny

Grammar Civil Patrol
Jul 2, 2004
1,108
0
Sandy Eggo, CA
Ok...i know it's been awhile...but i had to share the good news with those that still know me over here...

<SNIP>

on a side note...gotta love the kids. my son was inspecting the new bike and began ROTFL at how my bike seat "had a butt crack" in it. :oops: :lol:
So, you can tell your son this:

A good saddle is designed in all aspects with specific purposes in mind.
1. A wide flat area at the back will support your sitz bones.

2. A cut-away down the center will relieve pressure on your soft tissues and allow better blood flow.

3. A hard saddle will allow support your body and allow the muscles over your sitz bones to develop, thereby protecting the bones (much like orthodocs help the muscles of the feet to develop).

4. A cushy saddle will not allow your butt muscles to develop. If you are only on the bike for 30 minutes once a week, this is fine; you wouldn't have time to develop the muscles anyway. But if you're putting in more hours, you would do better with a non-cushy saddle.

...and then stuff not necessarily to tell the boy:
Men generally ride their saddles flat and level; women like theirs tilted down about 1-2 degrees. It relieves pressure from the soft tissues and is much more comfortable.

If you are going to spend more than 30 minutes a week on the bike, I recommend a good pair of bike shorts. The padding will feel like a diaper at first, but you get used to it. It will help take the edge off the soreness. Also, never wear underwear with your bike shorts. The idea is to have no seams directly between your body and the saddle. Where you sit on a seam, it will be uncomfortable.

NOTE: You have a men's bike with a men's saddle, which is narrower than a typical women's saddle, but will probably be fine for now. FYI, your shop will (or should as a Specialized dealer) have a sitz bones measuring device, affectionately called the a**-o-meter. This memory foam and measuring tape will determine how far apart your sitz bones are. If the saddle you have is uncomfortable in the first 10 minutes, go back to the shop and ask them to please help you out. You could probably tell them you've come in to [sit on the foam and] make a good impression with your a*...
:twitch:


Congrats on the new bike. You chose one that will last forever. :)

If they didn't tell you at the shop, have it checked any time it starts making noise, shifting by itself in the rear (loose cable), or if something doesn't seem right. Your bike should not creek, groan, click, rattle, or wobble.
 

bitingback

Turbo Monkey
So, you can tell your son this:

A good saddle is designed in all aspects with specific purposes in mind.
1. A wide flat area at the back will support your sitz bones.

2. A cut-away down the center will relieve pressure on your soft tissues and allow better blood flow.

3. A hard saddle will allow support your body and allow the muscles over your sitz bones to develop, thereby protecting the bones (much like orthodocs help the muscles of the feet to develop).

4. A cushy saddle will not allow your butt muscles to develop. If you are only on the bike for 30 minutes once a week, this is fine; you wouldn't have time to develop the muscles anyway. But if you're putting in more hours, you would do better with a non-cushy saddle.

...and then stuff not necessarily to tell the boy:
Men generally ride their saddles flat and level; women like theirs tilted down about 1-2 degrees. It relieves pressure from the soft tissues and is much more comfortable.

If you are going to spend more than 30 minutes a week on the bike, I recommend a good pair of bike shorts. The padding will feel like a diaper at first, but you get used to it. It will help take the edge off the soreness. Also, never wear underwear with your bike shorts. The idea is to have no seams directly between your body and the saddle. Where you sit on a seam, it will be uncomfortable.

NOTE: You have a men's bike with a men's saddle, which is narrower than a typical women's saddle, but will probably be fine for now. FYI, your shop will (or should as a Specialized dealer) have a sitz bones measuring device, affectionately called the a**-o-meter. This memory foam and measuring tape will determine how far apart your sitz bones are. If the saddle you have is uncomfortable in the first 10 minutes, go back to the shop and ask them to please help you out. You could probably tell them you've come in to [sit on the foam and] make a good impression with your a*...
:twitch:


Congrats on the new bike. You chose one that will last forever. :)

If they didn't tell you at the shop, have it checked any time it starts making noise, shifting by itself in the rear (loose cable), or if something doesn't seem right. Your bike should not creek, groan, click, rattle, or wobble.

Thanks Sunny...that was extremely helpful. I'll keep in mind the saddle info once it gets warm enough to ride. I always knew i'd make an impression with my *ss...just didn't realize it would be this way. :rofl:

As for the maintenance...i'm moving to texas this summer...so hopefully it'll be fine till then. Once i get there i have a ton of friends that can hook me up with maintenance and repairs.