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Toshi

Harbinger of Doom
Oct 23, 2001
26,115
1,743
My English usage in that post was less than excellent. In particular what I was trying to say is that chemo/radiation often trashes quality of life. Extending life per se is not necessarily a benefit. I have an advance care directive that is essentially a DNR. Let's see what happens in the case I need to make decisions.
I agree with you. Most good studies of cancer treatments' efficacy therefore measure quality-adjusted years of life gained rather than just straight time.
 

ALEXIS_DH

Tirelessly Awesome
Jan 30, 2003
5,313
130
Lima, Peru, Peru
My English usage in that post was less than excellent. In particular what I was trying to say is that chemo/radiation often trashes quality of life. Extending life per se is not necessarily a benefit. I have an advance care directive that is essentially a DNR. Let's see what happens in the case I need to make decisions.
https://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2014/10/why-i-hope-to-die-at-75/379329/

Death is far from being the worst thing that can happen to you.
 

eric strt6

Resident Curmudgeon
Sep 8, 2001
14,462
3,627
directly above the center of the earth
Rep. Chris Collins, R-N.Y. was arrested Wednesday morning on federal insider trading charges, law enforcement officials said.

An indictment obtained from a federal grand jury relates to Australian biotech company Innate Immunotherapeutics, on which Collins served as a board member.

It alleges Collins, 68, scrambled to call his son from the White House lawn and tell him non-public information about a failed drug trial in which they both owned shares.


Collins' son, Cameron Collins, 25, as well as the father of his fiancee, Stephen Zarsky, 66, were also charged, according to the court filing.

The Republican representative from upstate New York, President Donald Trump's earliest backer in Congress, felt an almost immediate political fallout in the wake of the charges.

https://www.cnbc.com/2018/08/08/gop-congressman-chris-collins-to-be-indicted-on-insider-trading-charge.html
 

Pesqueeb

bicycle in airplane hangar
Feb 2, 2007
27,125
3,535
Riding the baggage carousel.

eric strt6

Resident Curmudgeon
Sep 8, 2001
14,462
3,627
directly above the center of the earth
(CNN)A federal district judge who was appointed by President Donald Trump has upheld Robert Mueller's appointment and constitutional authority in the special counsel's case against Russian social media propagandists.

Judge Dabney Friedrich, who serves at the trial-court level in DC federal court, said Concord Management and Consulting could not have its case tossed on constitutional grounds. The Russian company accused of backing a social media effort to sway voters against Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton claimed Mueller didn't have power to bring the case because he was not appointment by the President and confirmed by Congress. Mueller was appointed under the authority of Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein, who has broad power as the acting head of the Justice Department for the 2016 election probe.

"The appointment does not violate core separation-of-powers principles. Nor has the Special Counsel exceeded his authority under the appointment order by investigating and prosecuting Concord," Friedrich wrote in an opinion published Monday morning. She was one of the first judges Trump placed into a federal court position.
Friedrich cited opinions by three other federal judges -- Amy Berman Jackson, who oversees Paul Manafort's criminal foreign lobbying case; T.S. Ellis, who oversees Manafort's financial fraud case; and DC District Court Chief Judge Beryl Howell -- to back up her decision.
All three judges also denied requests to invalidate Mueller's authority, with Howell writing as recently as late July that a witness subpoenaed to turn over documents and to testify before the grand jury about Roger Stone would have to. That witness, Andrew Miller, has been held in contempt of the court and now may appeal.

Trump, along with his lawyers Rudy Giuliani and Jay Sekulow, have claimed that Mueller's investigation violated the Constitution. Most notably, Trump said in an early June tweet that Mueller's appointment was "totally UNCONSTITUTIONAL." Monday's ruling specifically rejected some of these arguments that Trump's lawyers have made on television.

https://www.cnn.com/2018/08/13/politics/robert-mueller-concord-management-and-consulting/index.html
 

Pesqueeb

bicycle in airplane hangar
Feb 2, 2007
27,125
3,535
Riding the baggage carousel.

eric strt6

Resident Curmudgeon
Sep 8, 2001
14,462
3,627
directly above the center of the earth
Choke on this Betsy

(Bloomberg) -- U.S. Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos lost a lawsuit brought by 19 states and the District of Columbia, accusing her department of wrongly delaying implementation of Obama-era regulations meant to protect students who took out loans to attend college from predatory practices.

A Washington federal court judge on Wednesday ruled the department’s postponement of the so-called Borrower Defense rule was procedurally improper.

The Obama administration created the rule in the wake of revelations that some for-profit colleges enticed students with promises of an education and diplomas that would allow them to get jobs in their chosen fields. In reality, many of those certifications weren’t recognized by prospective employers, leaving graduates saddled with student loans they couldn’t repay.



The department deprived plaintiffs "of several concrete benefits that they would have otherwise accrued," U.S. District Judge Randolph Moss wrote in a 57-page opinion. "The relief they seek in this action — immediate implementation of the Borrower Defense regulations — would restore those benefits."

Writing that he didn’t want to delay matters further, Moss said he will hold a hearing Friday to consider remedies.

https://www.sfgate.com/business/article/Betsy-DeVos-Loses-Student-Loan-Lawsuit-Brought-by-13225153.php
 

eric strt6

Resident Curmudgeon
Sep 8, 2001
14,462
3,627
directly above the center of the earth
Karma is a real Bitch sometimes :banana::banana::banana::banana:

Wisconsin's Republican Governor Scott Walker lost a very narrow race for reelection to Democratic challenger Tony Evers on Tuesday. But it wasn't close enough to qualify for a recount — thanks to a law he signed himself last year.

Around 1 a.m. on Wednesday, when the vote was still too close to call, Walker's lieutenant governor, Rebecca Kleefisch, told supporters to prepare for a recount, CBS affiliate WDJT reported. Kleefisch told supporters "the fight is not over."

"We must ensure every valid vote in the state of Wisconsin is counted and we must be gracious no matter the outcome," she said.

Before he conceded, Walker's campaign wanted an examination of allegedly damaged ballots. He also wanted an official canvas of the vote, meaning absentee and accepted provisional ballots would be counted with Election Day ballots, WDJT reported.

The campaign did not end up requesting a recount — and they legally couldn't have anyway.

Based on unofficial results, Evers won by about 31,000 votes, according to the Associated Press. Evers led Walker 49.6 percent to 48.4 percent.

If a candidate in Wisconsin is losing by less than 1 percent, they can ask for a recount — but Walker lost by 1.2 percent.

Business Insider reports that the threshold is due to a law Walker signed after President Trump was elected. Mr. Trump won Wisconsin by 23,000 votes, and Green Party candidate Jill Stein, who received just 1 percent of the vote, demanded and received a recount, the Milwaukee Journal Sentinel reports. In response, the state legislature passed a measure mandating that in the future, candidates could only request a recount if they were losing by less than 1 percent.

Therefore, Walker did not qualify for a recount, like his lieutenant governor initially suggested when the race was too close to call. Walker ultimately called Evers to concede.
https://www.cbsnews.com/news/scott-walker-narrowly-loses-wisconsin-governors-race-and-he-cant-ask-for-a-recount-because-of-a-law-he-put-in-place/