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Caveat emptor!!!

N8 v2.0

Not the sharpest tool in the shed
Oct 18, 2002
11,007
149
The Cleft of Venus
Beware of Damaged Cars from Katrina

Washington DC September 28, 2005; The AIADA newsletter reported that insurance companies have issued a warning to consumers to be on the look-out for flood-damaged cars from Hurricane Katrina, unlikely to be insured, that may end up on the used car market, reports USA Today. "Many times after a very wet storm, we have to be careful about people trying to dry out cars and then sell them," says Bill Bailey, managing director of the Hurricane Insurance Information Center. But, this time, damage is so severe "that it’s going to be hard to disguise that the car came from Katrina." State Farm Insurance has already received 79,000 claims for cars damaged in Katrina and subsequent New Orleans flooding. “Some vehicles were damaged by falling trees and debris; others were simply washed away and are missing. Those that were stuck underwater are covered in strange sediment and gunk’ that smells musty and funky,’ says State Farm spokesman Kip Diggs. The National Insurance Crime Bureau sent investigators to Baton Rouge and Mobile, Ala., to start a national registry of cars damaged by Katrina in an effort to prevent them from being resold.
 

MTB_Rob_NC

What do I have to do to get you in this car TODAY?
Nov 15, 2002
3,430
0
Charlotte, NC
Flood cars are bad bad bad news. There is a reason that the insurance co's almost always total loss a flood vehicle even if the damage appears to be minimal.

Water + electrical components = bad stuff over time
Water + mechanical components = bad stuff over time

You may think the car you have or will buy is fine and it maybe running fine today. But you have no idea the extent of the water damage and the corrosion that is occuring as time passes. You may end up chasing shorts and internal corrosion issues FOREVER.

Let them die in peace.
 

Sherpa

Basking in fail.
Jan 28, 2004
2,240
0
Arkansaw
Mtb_Rob_FL said:
Flood cars are bad bad bad news. There is a reason that the insurance co's almost always total loss a flood vehicle even if the damage appears to be minimal.

Water + electrical components = bad stuff over time
Water + mechanical components = bad stuff over time

You may think the car you have or will buy is fine and it maybe running fine today. But you have no idea the extent of the water damage and the corrosion that is occuring as time passes. You may end up chasing shorts and internal corrosion issues FOREVER.

Let them die in peace.
So in other words, drive it for a few months and sell it to some chump.