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Are Cliff Bars getting smaller?

  • Yes

    Votes: 17 65.4%
  • No

    Votes: 7 26.9%
  • I've been gaining weight so my opinion is biased

    Votes: 1 3.8%
  • I eat pro bars instead

    Votes: 1 3.8%

  • Total voters
    26

stoney

Part of the unwashed, middle-American horde
Jul 26, 2006
17,840
3,188
Colorado
The reasoning is very simple.
1) Food inflation is rising = more expensive food
2) People feel they are paying more if the numerical cost increases
3) People are too dumb to look at the cost/ounce of what they buy

All added together means less food for more money. Which, given the obesity rates in our country, might not actually be a bad thing.
 

TheTruth

Turbo Monkey
Jun 15, 2009
3,899
1
I'm waving. Can you see me now?
The reasoning is very simple.
1) Food inflation is rising = more expensive food
2) People feel they are paying more if the numerical cost increases
3) People are too dumb to look at the cost/ounce of what they buy

All added together means less food for more money. Which, given the obesity rates in our country, might not actually be a bad thing.
But what about the poor skinny people? Will they starve from lack of clif bar?
 

jonKranked

Detective Dookie
Nov 10, 2005
71,441
13,722
media blackout
The reasoning is very simple.
1) Food inflation is rising = more expensive food
2) People feel they are paying more if the numerical cost increases
3) People are too dumb to look at the cost/ounce of what they buy

All added together means less food for more money. Which, given the obesity rates in our country, might not actually be a bad thing.
my girlfriend works in the food industry.... joker's above statement is far too polite.
 

jutny

Monkey
Jan 15, 2009
306
0
Montclair, NJ
my girlfriend works in the food industry.... joker's above statement is far too polite.
so do I, although on a different end. I think my company has your girlfriends company as a client.

I agree, food is a ****ed up industry.

That said, there are some interesting initiatives going on to "add health" to food by finding natural alternatives to certain popular food ingredients.

Clif bars are delicious, no comment on size.
 

jonKranked

Detective Dookie
Nov 10, 2005
71,441
13,722
media blackout
so do I, although on a different end. I think my company has your girlfriends company as a client.

I agree, food is a ****ed up industry.

That said, there are some interesting initiatives going on to "add health" to food by finding natural alternatives to certain popular food ingredients.

Clif bars are delicious, no comment on size.
when it comes to food, avoid processed. i take nuts and dried fruit on rides. sometimes some beef/deer jerky.
 

stoney

Part of the unwashed, middle-American horde
Jul 26, 2006
17,840
3,188
Colorado
when it comes to food, avoid processed. i take nuts and dried fruit on rides. sometimes some beef/deer jerky.
We've been trying to move as far away from processed food as possible. It is REALLY hard to avoid it, even when making you own food. To move away from processed foods, you pretty much need someone dedicated to making food at home. It's just shy of being a full-time job. Add into growing some of your own food and it gets even harder.

It does make a lot of sense to go semi-off grid and self-sustain for a majority of your needs. At least off-grid enough to maintain a small crop that will mostly support a small family. A bit of property with wooded areas to use for fuel isn't a bad idea either.

Alas, to get far enough removed it is almost impossible to have one person working a normal/corporate job to pay for the rest of the bills.
 

I Are Baboon

nuts of sashimi
Aug 6, 2001
30,877
4,571
MTB New England
10 people have voted that Clif bars are getting smaller, but I can't find any evidence of that. :confused:


I haven't bought any Clif bars in quite a while. I've still got 8,000 Luna bars that TreeSaw sent me that I am working on.
 

Da Peach

Outwitted by a rodent
Jul 2, 2002
13,201
3,287
North Van
What snippy bunch we've become.

They should just change "bar" to "clumps". That would make me forgive them.
 

stoney

Part of the unwashed, middle-American horde
Jul 26, 2006
17,840
3,188
Colorado
But what about the 3 billion other people who live on less than 1$ a day???
The more expensive the food, the more farmers will produce. Which will in turn lead to more food available. The 'crunch' will likely be a short-term issue internationally, as more can be paid in international currencies than USD. It will be more long-term as wages in the US will not correct for inflation for a longer period of time.

As for the rest of that problem, they've gone into the realm which BS describes as over-population and population saturation. Too much population = starvation. Ecosystems can only support so much life and while unfortunate, it's nature.
 

TheMontashu

Pourly Tatteued Jeu
Mar 15, 2004
5,549
0
I'm homeless
The more expensive the food, the more farmers will produce. Which will in turn lead to more food available. The 'crunch' will likely be a short-term issue internationally, as more can be paid in international currencies than USD. It will be more long-term as wages in the US will not correct for inflation for a longer period of time.
Go do some research into the food industry, it's more the science of figuring out how to use our excess corn and soy than anything else. It's the fuel costs that are driving prices up, not the supply.

As for the rest of that problem, they've gone into the realm which BS describes as over-population and population saturation. Too much population = starvation. Ecosystems can only support so much life and while unfortunate, it's nature.
I can respect that point of view, and agree with it in allot of ways
 

jimmydean

The Official Meat of Ridemonkey
Sep 10, 2001
33,376
6,243
Portland, OR
The reasoning is very simple.
3) People are too dumb to look at the cost/ounce of what they buy

All added together means less food for more money. Which, given the obesity rates in our country, might not actually be a bad thing.
I was teaching my daughter this at the Dollar Store the other day. A bag of gummy bears is the same price as a bag of gummy worms (both a buck), but if you look at the package weight, bears are a much better deal because you get nearly twice as much by volume.

Then we looked at the price per pound at WinCo in bulk. Gummy worms and bears are the same price per pound at WinCo. Based on the price per oz, WinCo is cheaper for both and if you would rather have worms than bears, then it's even better.

I love the prices at WinCo because on the shelf, they give the price per unit (oz, gram, pound, whatever) so you can compare the regular size vs. family size, or in the case of TP, the cost per square (seriously) :rofl:
 

TheTruth

Turbo Monkey
Jun 15, 2009
3,899
1
I'm waving. Can you see me now?
10 people have voted that Clif bars are getting smaller, but I can't find any evidence of that. :confused:


I haven't bought any Clif bars in quite a while. I've still got 8,000 Luna bars that TreeSaw sent me that I am working on.
Perhaps Clif Bar employees surf the forums and want to remain anonymous in fear that Clif Bar may use their shrinking machine on them?

But seriously, I wish somebody could find an older clif bar (Dictionary Size) and compare it to the present clif bar. In fact, this makes me realize that the Clif Bar name should be changed to "Watch your step, bar"
 

OGRipper

back alley ripper
Feb 3, 2004
10,248
689
NORCAL is the hizzle
I think they are getting more dense - they seem harder to chew and digest than they did originally, like they've all been sitting on the shelf too long. That may make them seem smaller for the same weight. I prefer the Mojo bars if I need to buy an energy bar, they are tastier and easier to digest.

But really, lately I'm a trail mix and beef jerkey guy.