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Computerized Suspension

Discussion in 'The Shop' started by Thrillkil, Nov 6, 2005.

  1. Thrillkil

    Thrillkil Monkey

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    #1 -   Nov 6, 2005

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  2. maxyedor

    maxyedor <b>TOOL PRO</b>

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    well you see linkage forks had this weird thing about them where they weighed more got less travel, and broke more often, so nobody would touch the stuff. People lost interest and it fizzled also think if a computer controled your suspension and that computer had its battery die then what?
     
    #2 -   Nov 6, 2005
  3. zahgurim

    zahgurim Underwater monkey

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    lolAsia
    Doesn't Cannondale have an electronic Lefty?

    Haha, I remember wanting one of those K2/Noleens soooo bad. I was on a Girvin Vector2 at the time, that was the new model.
     
    #3 -   Nov 6, 2005
  4. Thrillkil

    Thrillkil Monkey

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    I remember enough to know that linkage forks are dumb, but my main question is why people didn't pursue this sort of technology for other applications? I suppose the ghost of the Mavic Mektronic lives on :)
     
    #4 -   Nov 7, 2005
  5. binary visions

    binary visions The voice of reason

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    I think the ratio of cost:weight/complexity/expense ratio just isn't there. This died for the same reason that Shimano Airlines died. It's not that it didn't work well, or couldn't be developed further. I mean, who wouldn't want instant, snappy, precise shifting?

    It's a big cost increase, only to add weight and significant complexity to your bike. Had the technology been developed further, it's very likely that weight, cost, and complexity would not have gone down - performance would have just gotten better. Riders will pay any amount of money for a small performance gain, but not when they pay so many penalties for it.

    Suspension performance from a good quality, well set up shock is going to be pretty great. The performance increase just isn't/wasn't/won't be worth the downsides.
     
    #5 -   Nov 7, 2005
  6. RhinofromWA

    RhinofromWA Brevity R Us

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    Wasn't the K2 fork (both the linkage and std tele-fork) basically an electronic blow off valve? Or an early Platform system if you will. :think:

    I can't remember.
     
    #6 -   Nov 7, 2005
  7. Ascentrek

    Ascentrek Monkey

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    Oh man... this brings back memories.

    I have a K2 bike that has this shock (I loan it to people that want something to ride around town with). The shock is interesting. It hardens up toward the end of the stroke... that's what the electronic thingy does. You can also set it up for a stiffer ride or softer ride. Works much like air shocks do, but you need a 9 volt.
     
  8. RhinofromWA

    RhinofromWA Brevity R Us

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    Because cyclist can't figure out how to adjust a freak'n deraileur let alone a computerized suspension system.

    :D
     
  9. Bati

    Bati Monkey

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    I think than linking a kind of piezoelectric valving to a torque sensor in pedaling system (BB, maybe), could be a good way to get an active suspension with effective pedaling... Honda gonna make it?
     
  10. maxyedor

    maxyedor <b>TOOL PRO</b>

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    Tenthousand Honda engineers are allready slaving away to create it after seeing this post, it will be done tomarrow and only cost 3.45 million
     
  11. MikeT

    MikeT Monkey

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    actually, there is suspension out there, i think for cars, that has viscous fluid with metal flakes in it, for which when u apply a current, it can make the fluid thicker or thinner, hence controlling the suspension... something like that
     
  12. Bati

    Bati Monkey

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    I've heard about that, but, how fast could be the viscosity switching? fast enough to change the shock performance in small track sections?...
    Let´s read...
     
  13. MikeT

    MikeT Monkey

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    A couple years back there was a ME (mechanical engineering) senior here, who for his senior design project, designed a bike suspension system around that idea (I believe)... don't have much info about it though. It would be interesting to research it further, but I'm already on another design team (CVT for a bike :drool: )
     
  14. Bati

    Bati Monkey

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    Oh, yes. There were roumors about the first Honda prototypes were on a CVT platform.
    .... and about the magnetics, it may be closer to real than i guess
    it's almost done
     
  15. MikeT

    MikeT Monkey

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    ahh haha, i go to Virginia Tech! thats too funny:love:
     
  16. Fulton

    Fulton Monkey

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    new the 2006 white brothers XC fork use a magnetics for their SPV valve. on the newer corvette's, there is are iron particles in the shock fluid, and running a current through it changes the viscosity instantly
     
  17. MikeT

    MikeT Monkey

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    awsome, so whoop there it is.

    crazy engineers man, CRAZY:cool:
     
  18. Bati

    Bati Monkey

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    Yes, but the WB isn't magnetic fluid, it doesn't change viscosity. It's just a magnet in the valve wich makes it works like an on/off switch... better the floodgate.
    And about the Corvette, right, that's the same principle i'd like to see on a bike... the same as in '90s F1
     
  19. Bati

    Bati Monkey

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    Great, now i'm finding out about some e-learning programs at VT.
    Good luck !
     
  20. ALEXIS_DH

    ALEXIS_DH Tirelessly Awesome

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    almost instantly.
    i saw a demo of that a while ago.

    my jaw dropped at first. it went from almost no damping, to hydraulic lock out almost instantly.
     
  21. Ascentrek

    Ascentrek Monkey

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    FOX has a pro line for SCORE/BAJA type racing. You can adjust the ride and suspension. Lots of extra's though... I don't need it for my bike... the simpler the be better.
     
  22. jesusgatos

    jesusgatos Chimp

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    I'm pretty sure that Fox isn't using any type of magnetic shock fluid in their off-road shocks. I talked to them about it after I saw what Bose was working on. They had already looked into it, but the fluid is too viscus and would overheat in an off-road application. It's pretty cool technology though. The only person/company that has any real experience/success with magnetic fluid in off-road shocks is Rod Millen (and all of that was related to military contracts).