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Crampon Ultimates!!!

supramk388

Chimp
Oct 20, 2010
63
0
Albuquerque
"We just received the first couple dozen sets of Crampon Ultimates.

They weigh in at 320 grams per pair.

The platform measures 106mm x 106mm x 10mm.

They are available in Black, blue, red, gold, orange and purple.

Retail is $150, call Sean at Canfield Brothers to get one of the first sets. 801-548-2556 Not available on the web yet, the web store will include these in a couple weeks when we receive the remaining pedals.

I've been on these for a year and I couldn't be happier. See for yourself."

Quote from Canfield Brothers

 

Bedlam

Monkey
Feb 13, 2010
247
0
Under ground
That's why I recognized the word.. Oh well. That is a pretty good name, but it still makes me think tampon every time though :/
Sometimes I guess life is funnier when English isn't your first language!

And, back on topic, they do look awesome like I said, nice and slimmed!
 

supramk388

Chimp
Oct 20, 2010
63
0
Albuquerque
And I'm sure your opinion is completely valid on these pedals. I mean, you even have a link to the company in your signature.
Yes I know and I see dropmachine as your user name, should I not got to that site now since it associated with you?

I do support top level companies and products. Can we move on please...
 

gollub01

Chimp
Sep 10, 2010
50
0
jh wyoming
The Ultimate's are LEGIT ! We call them the perfect circle.....cause thats the pedal motion....No more pushing bricks ! Super light, Super thin, Huckable......

There are a lot of companies making really BAD-AZZ stuff these days. We are all lucky to have so many options. If you hate them, Canfield will buy them back ! They're not happy if your not! A Mag version is also on the way for the really weight conscious folks.

Ricky your pedals are on the way ! Brapp !!
 

Huck Banzai

Turbo Monkey
May 8, 2005
2,526
21
Transitory
150$ for pedals?

My straitlines? Worth more, paid less.

My Po1nt Podiums? Neat pedals, not worth the coin.
- NO pedal should use threaded pins from the back -- they MUST be cut before being backed out to be replaced; if badly enough damaged, you dont get the pin out. Ever.
- The bulb where the bearing is -- Id like to see rev 2, because despite thinking it would never be an issue, it is always in the way, and its doody! (I SAID DOODY!)


There are lots of great pedals out there; 26 has the best pin insertion design, but also insists on making overly/unnecessarily sharp pins that destroy shins (and even clothing that gets close)


These crampons look to be an evolution -- must give them a try; for all my complaints about the Po1nt, the thinness and 'anti-flip' qualities are really obvious and Id like to find THE thin pedal.

Id prefer to pay less than 100, but then, oh yeah, I will pay less than 100...

:P
 

JA666

Chimp
Dec 29, 2010
16
0
AUS
They certainly look good, but they seem to be just another copy of the new HT pedals with slightly different machining on the body. Not that it's a bad thing though, I'm running the Da Bomb version and they're awesome!
 

norbar

Turbo Monkey
Jun 7, 2007
9,891
493
Warsaw :/
Well you know what they say, "you get what you pay for" and "nobody loves me, better than me".

Just saying... :D
Naah. You get what some due positioned some product at because some other dude positioned a similar product at the same price. Seriously. flat pedal prices got out of hand lately. I know it's not a cheap product to make and I like crampons but they became more expensive than top level clipless stuff for roadies. That makes no sense.
 

blackohio

Generous jaywalker
Mar 12, 2009
2,796
120
Hellafornia. Formerly stumptown.
They certainly look good, but they seem to be just another copy of the new HT pedals with slightly different machining on the body. Not that it's a bad thing though, I'm running the Da Bomb version and they're awesome!
I hope your 12 others posts are relevant to whatever topic is at hand because this one is downright stupid. They look nothing like the HT's, machining or not.
 

JA666

Chimp
Dec 29, 2010
16
0
AUS
I hope your 12 others posts are relevant to whatever topic is at hand because this one is downright stupid. They look nothing like the HT's, machining or not.
Haha settle down there mate. The pedal body obviously has different machining , but they share many similar features:

-Pedal/crank interface, inparticular the DU/bearing setup
-Spindle taper/recess from the crank interface (raised a couple mm towards the threads)
-Endcap/nylock nut (same setup as HT's etc)
-Pedal body shares a very simlar profile (aside from machining, and slightly different shape).

Very nice pedals no doubt, but very similar (if not the same in certain areas) to other taiwanese pedals out there..
 

sbabuser

Turbo Monkey
Dec 22, 2004
1,089
42
Golden, CO
Haha settle down there mate. The pedal body obviously has different machining , but they share many similar features:

-Pedal/crank interface, inparticular the DU/bearing setup
-Spindle taper/recess from the crank interface (raised a couple mm towards the threads)
-Endcap/nylock nut (same setup as HT's etc)
-Pedal body shares a very simlar profile (aside from machining, and slightly different shape).

Very nice pedals no doubt, but very similar (if not the same in certain areas) to other taiwanese pedals out there..
Are the HT's also convex? I bet the Canfields are thinner.
 

supramk388

Chimp
Oct 20, 2010
63
0
Albuquerque
Naah. You get what some due positioned some product at because some other dude positioned a similar product at the same price. Seriously. flat pedal prices got out of hand lately. I know it's not a cheap product to make and I like crampons but they became more expensive than top level clipless stuff for roadies. That makes no sense.
Actually Canfield Brothers were one of the first companies to come out with thin pedals for the mountain bike Ind. Production pedals. When Crampons hit the market a few years ago, then you saw other mfgs. trying get a thin pedal made.

Like Sean stated, lots of great pedal choices out now it is great for mountain biking.

I am looking forward to my new pedals they show up tomorrow.
 

William42

fork ways
Jul 31, 2007
3,749
398
The flypapers were the first wafer pedal. nobody wanted them because of a silly crank interface

Canfields were the second, very closely followed by podiums. This is an evolution of their first crampon. HT jumped on board later. And yes, they are made in taiwan, probably by the same company, but just because they probably share the same spindle design etc doesn't mean the Canfields are a "copy." They came out first, they're thinner, and they're a completely different pedal.
 

supramk388

Chimp
Oct 20, 2010
63
0
Albuquerque
The flypapers were the first wafer pedal. nobody wanted them because of a silly crank interface

Canfields were the second, very closely followed by podiums. This is an evolution of their first crampon. HT jumped on board later. And yes, they are made in taiwan, probably by the same company, but just because they probably share the same spindle design etc doesn't mean the Canfields are a "copy." They came out first, they're thinner, and they're a completely different pedal.
Everyone knows about flypapers and did those ever hit production? I stated one of the 1rst to hit the market with production pedals. No special cranks, just an awesome pedal for us to enjoy, thank Canfield Brothers.
 

norbar

Turbo Monkey
Jun 7, 2007
9,891
493
Warsaw :/
Actually Canfield Brothers were one of the first companies to come out with thin pedals for the mountain bike Ind. Production pedals. When Crampons hit the market a few years ago, then you saw other mfgs. trying get a thin pedal made.

Like Sean stated, lots of great pedal choices out now it is great for mountain biking.

I am looking forward to my new pedals they show up tomorrow.
Yes but they were not one of the first companies to come up with a stupid expensive pedal. Not bashing the company, great guys and great product but pedal prices got really inflated for no reason.
 

dropmachine

Turbo Monkey
Sep 7, 2001
2,923
10
Your face.
I used to own the site, hence the sig. Did you used to own Canfield?


My problem with these pedals is their origin. Straitlines, 26s and Point1s are North American made, so I can see the cost reasons. Where are these from?

Very pretty though, just can't quite come to terms with the pricing.
 

gollub01

Chimp
Sep 10, 2010
50
0
jh wyoming
Crampon Ultimates = $150 "regular" Crampon = $120.......Right on price with the 2k $ forks were rolling around with and the $100 each tires. I for one and psyched to be able to pedal almost anywhere....This is one product I "must have" on a dh bike. Canfield Brothers also helps out shop guys and the mid pack racers ! Something not every company will help with...
 

Dogboy

Turbo Monkey
Apr 12, 2004
3,136
274
Chapel Hill, NC
They certainly look good, but they seem to be just another copy of the new HT pedals with slightly different machining on the body. Not that it's a bad thing though, I'm running the Da Bomb version and they're awesome!
Not a copy really, those are made by HT ;)
 

supramk388

Chimp
Oct 20, 2010
63
0
Albuquerque
Did you used to own Canfield?
No, I wish I owned Canfield Brothers. I think Chris and Lance are two of nicest guys you can meet or ride with as well. One other cool thing about CB's is that two amazing riders own the company, rider owned!

My problem with these pedals is their origin. Straitlines, 26s and Point1s are North American made, so I can see the cost reasons. Where are these from?
So you only buy stuff made in America I get that, what kind of car do you drive? Have you ever used Maxxis tires?

Very pretty though, just can't quite come to terms with the pricing.
R&D, tooling costs, smaller production runs. Those are all factors, have you ever produced parts for production?

I am sure we would all like to see pedals for 49.99 but this is a business not a non-profit organization.
 
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norbar

Turbo Monkey
Jun 7, 2007
9,891
493
Warsaw :/
I am sure we would all like to see pedals for 49.99 but someboby still has to pay the bills.
Ht pedals can be easily had for 50$ if you think about the an01ss. Of course they are 440g but they grip awesome and are super durable. Though yeah canfield produces theirs in smaller volumes so the price has to be higher. At the other hand the correlation goes both ways ;) I'm quite sure the first company that makes a good looking (tech wise, don't mean only colors) for <100$ can make some serious cash.
 

dropmachine

Turbo Monkey
Sep 7, 2001
2,923
10
Your face.
Exactly. I don't care where stuff comes from. I buy what works. But I do expect that if production costs are lower, that those savings should be passed on to the customer. Canfield used to be EXCELLENT with their pricing. The Jedi was far more affordable (lol affordable) than other competing frames. Now, now so much.

Seems that as the name grows, so does the pricing.
 

flymybike

Monkey
Jan 7, 2004
260
0
Jackson Hole
DM - which is it? You said that "My problem with these pedals is their origin" and now you say the opposite "Exactly. I don't care where stuff comes from". Fact is we are not a manufacturer. We don't have a factory to make all this happen so we rely on some great partners that can produce a great product. Taiwan has the factory's that build bike parts. We hope that the scene in Portland will grow in the coming years and we will have some other choices. Building in the US is what we want to be doing but as a small company, we can't build a production facility for the products we do.

You say we used to be excellent with our pricing, our frame prices have stayed very steady within a few hundred dollars, right in the middle of the market prices. We lower our Crampon price $30 with this Ultimate coming out. I feel it's a fair price for all the advantages you get. In the end, you get a great product from us or your money back.

There are lots of great options and you can buy based on what your feel is the most important, for us it's performance. Stepping it up since 1999!

[video]<iframe width="560" height="315" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/Vn29DvMITu4" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>[/video]
 

davec113

Monkey
May 24, 2009
419
0
They look more like the pic below, if they are shared production with Spank, they are a great pedal. I've had the Spanks for a while and they have held up great, and are an improvement over the Kona Wah Wah's which IMO is high praise. The Spanks weigh 400g and cost $100, so since the Canfields are lighter I think the $150 price is justified and I'll buy a pair and put 'em on my trailbike, the Spanks can go on the DH rig... now I just wish I had an extra $150, lol....

edit: notice the bulge in the pedal body over the inside of the spindle to hold the oversized bearing used to compensate for the smaller axle....

spank_spike_pedal_red.jpg
 
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supramk388

Chimp
Oct 20, 2010
63
0
Albuquerque
Exactly. I don't care where stuff comes from. I buy what works. But I do expect that if production costs are lower, that those savings should be passed on to the customer. Canfield used to be EXCELLENT with their pricing. The Jedi was far more affordable (lol affordable) than other competing frames. Now, now so much.

Seems that as the name grows, so does the pricing.
Have you seen the new Jedi? Its not the same bike so costs might changed.

If you would like a 2012 Jedi I am sure I can be you a good deal when you are ready. Just send me a PM.
 

Da Peach

Outwitted by a rodent
Jul 2, 2002
12,895
2,490
North Van
They look more like the pic below, if they are shared production with Spank, they are a great pedal. I've had the Spanks for a while and they have held up great, and are an improvement over the Kona Wah Wah's which IMO is high praise. The Spanks weigh 400g and cost $100, so since the Canfields are lighter I think the $150 price is justified and I'll buy a pair and put 'em on my trailbike, the Spanks can go on the DH rig... now I just wish I had an extra $150, lol....

edit: notice the bulge in the pedal body over the inside of the spindle to hold the oversized bearing used to compensate for the smaller axle....

View attachment 111225
Beware the bushings...

Also, I needed to hack the end off an allen key to get to the cage off the spindle... Note the limited space between the allen head and the outside of the cage.

THAT. IS. ANNOYING.

I really love the feel of them though. I'm riding with my old $40 brick-style pedals on my trail bike (due to the Spike bushing death) and its surprising to me how much I feel the difference with a thin pedal. My seat is noticeable higher (due to thicker pedals), and I smacked my pedals a fair amount too.
 
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dropmachine

Turbo Monkey
Sep 7, 2001
2,923
10
Your face.
You missed my point. I'm saying I don't care where stuff comes from in the sense that I'd never ignore something based on county of origin. I don't care where it comes from, long as it works. But I do expect something made overseas to have a lower price tag, you see?

And no, you pricing isn't good compared to what it used to be. The Jedi used to be a steal, and was priced much more favourably than other companies. Now it costs more than some North American made bikes, and I can't figure out why. I know the bike has gone though a lot of changes, but the point remains that its asian made and more expensive. Wheels and stems are about what i'd expect though.

You are definitely not the only ones doing this though. Seems to be a sad trend in the industry.
 

freeridefool

Monkey
Jun 17, 2006
647
0
medford, or
Im sure the ultimates are an improvement over the og crampons. But I far prefer the look of the og crampons. Mine have been rock solid. Other than a really bent spindle on a horrible crash they have been bomb proof.