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Dabbling in trials on a FS bike

Discussion in 'Trials' started by igxqrrl, Oct 1, 2005.

  1. igxqrrl

    igxqrrl Chimp

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    Hello,

    I've been playing around trying to develop some basic trials skills. I am not, nor will ever be, competing at any level. But I'd like to be able to pull some basic moves successfully.

    I see a lot of people ride specialty trials bikes. I've been using my FS bike (a K2 Evo frame). Am I setting myself up for failure with this bike? Will I notice a big difference riding at least a HT rather than FS frame?

    Thanks..
     
    #1 -   Oct 1, 2005

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  2. MDBullit

    MDBullit Monkey

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    yes... you won't get anywhere. You'll probably also break your bike too. I highly recommend a cheap trials bike such as the Monty 219 X-alp ($300)
     
    #2 -   Oct 1, 2005
  3. pangeist

    pangeist Monkey

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    the advantages gained by riding a trials specific bike are inumerable. however once learned many of the moves can be applied to everyday riding, even riding on a FS.
     
    #3 -   Oct 1, 2005
  4. dvasis

    dvasis Chimp

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    indeed......one of my favotire riders is von williams..and he does some quite amazing trials (for a fs'er) on an ellesworth dare...... but he alsor rides a trials bike so he can mix and match skills.
     
    #4 -   Oct 1, 2005
  5. igxqrrl

    igxqrrl Chimp

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    Is a cheap hardtail a reasonable alternative to a trials frame? I'm a reasonably big guy (6'4", 210 pounds), so am worried about the longevity of a low-end trials bike.

    Thanks..
     
    #5 -   Oct 2, 2005
  6. pangeist

    pangeist Monkey

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    I have a Giant STP as an urban bike, and as it was inspired by Lenosky it serves well as a dual purpose bike and they are not too expensive. Just be aware that head angle and stem length go a long way in making a bike more trials-like. So, suspension choice is critical on a hardtail or you could just go rigid. Rims take a ton of abuse as well and I swear by my Alex DX32's, I have them on my trials bike and my hardtail and they have taken more abuse than they deserve. Good luck.

    Oh yeah, I am 6'2" and 225 and the STP can handle me no problem.
     
    #6 -   Oct 3, 2005
  7. Sir_Crackien

    Sir_Crackien Turbo Monkey

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    the longevity of the lower end trials bike will not be a problem. i would look into getting a "stock" bike to learn on. it will be easier to transfer the skills over to other riding. the main reason the cheap one's are cheap is because they are not a light of a frame and not nice of parts. they will not be weak but also not light. that will be the main differance. the other diff will be the brake will not be hydro but that is no longer a problem. hydro are nice but not needed.
     
  8. Ascentrek

    Ascentrek Monkey

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    I was in your same boat a few years ago. Here's what I'd recommend.

    1. Go to www.observedtrials.net , There are a ton of great threads and discussions about people in your same situation.

    2. Trials Skills are all over the map. There are many things you can do on your FS frame. You need to ask yourself the question: Do you want to get into Trials riding, or do you want to have some trials skills for general riding?

    3. Start with what ever you have. There are some basic exercises that can help out. Brake timing, pedal return (like pedal kicking, but learning how to push and return the pedal with no revolutions), track stands, rear flip turns, etc. Hell, just keeping your feet on the pedals is a learning curve if you've used clipless pedals. learn how to bunny hop on flat pedals.

    4. If you like playing around, and you have some money to burn, look into a used Trials bike (www.observedtrials.net). Either a Mod or a stock would be fun to have around. You can pick up a used one for 500 or so. I started out on a PlanetX Zebdi, and I quickly found what I liked and didn't like about the bike. It also was the basis for my foundation for learning the basics. I then moved onto a Koxx stock LevelBoss. It has truely put me into a new realm of trials riding.

    5. Watch video and go ride with some experienced riders. They'll be good to bounce ideas off of. I had the luxury of a great trials scene here in Denver/Boulder.

    6. Mix it up. I still have fun doing Trials moves on my SC Bullit. I enjoy finding a real tough spot and throwing down some trials moves.

    7. If you can't get a used trials bike, just go find a small framed hard tail out there and start playing around. I know some guys in golden that are awesome at trials but don't have anything but XC bikes to do it on.
     
  9. lucky13

    lucky13 Chimp

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    What he said.


    What's the ODTT anyhow?
     
  10. Ascentrek

    Ascentrek Monkey

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    Beats me.