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Education Part ll

Discussion in 'Politics & World News' started by JOEBIALEK, Oct 25, 2005.

  1. JOEBIALEK

    JOEBIALEK Chimp

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    This is the second part to an earlier writing about education in the United States. As you may recall, I advocated for the privatization of all schools from kindergarten to graduate studies. This piece will focus on the curriculum that needs to be followed.

    Everytime I encounter someone in the workplace, I am reminded of just how much we have failed to properly educate United States citizens in the fundamentals of communication: reading, writing and speaking. Few would argue that the time is long overdue for the United States to "get back to the basics" of a fully functional education system. We need to exclusively focus on the development of communication skills from kindergarten to eighth grade along with annual testing that measures apptitude and interest. Training in mathematics should be limited to addition, subtraction, multiplication and division. Unless communication skills are fully mastered, there is no need to advance to high school.

    For those who graduate to high school, the emphasis could evolve into a curriculum of philosophy, sociology, economics, psychology, science and religious studies. Books such as "For Dummies" and "The Complete Idiot's Guide" could be used to foster an understanding of different religions. Athletic activity would be strictly confined to cardio vascular exercises and all sports would be eliminated. While there would still be an emphasis on communication skills, the focus would now be on developing a foundation of basic knowledge so as to be able to graduate to college. Testing for apptitude and interest would continue through high school increasing the chances of picking the right field of study . Those not continuing on to college would enter some type of apprenticeship training for the purpose of learning a trade. For those who do graduate to college, the student would continue to study an advanced version of the same curriculum as high school but only for the first two years then they would complete their education by strictly focusing on coursework designed to train them in their field of study. Nearing graduation, internships would be required to begin the transition to the working world. Think of how different our society would be if our education system could just teach the fundamentals of reading, writing and speaking.
     

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  2. Toshi

    Toshi Harbinger of Doom

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  3. Transcend

    Transcend My Nuts Are Flat

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    Wow this guy is a special one.

    Also, his education plan stinks.
     
  4. valve bouncer

    valve bouncer Master Dildoist

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    Mods, pull the pin on this cretin will ya. This is all he does, spam sites endlessly.
     
  5. JOEBIALEK

    JOEBIALEK Chimp

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    good points...
     
    #5 -   Nov 6, 2005
  6. arboc!

    arboc! Turbo Monkey

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    you're a douche bag
     
    #6 -   Nov 6, 2005
  7. BuddhaRoadkill

    BuddhaRoadkill I suck at Tool

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    Fixed.
     
    #7 -   Nov 6, 2005
  8. sanjuro

    sanjuro Tube Smuggler

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    JOEBIALEK,

    I am thinking about buying a Stumpjumper or a Blur. What is your opinion of FSR vs. VPP?

    Remember, this is a mountain bike site, not your bully pulpit.
     
    #8 -   Nov 6, 2005