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rockofullr

confused
Jun 11, 2009
7,356
917
East Bay, Cali
They would have been ok with a sexual predator if he had just been honest about being a predator :disgust:

If Mr Brown had been more open in his disclosures to his employer, the police and the Law Society, he would have been prepared to accept he had reformed - but he had been less than honest, Justice Wylie said.
 

stevew

unique white person
Sep 21, 2001
33,738
4,245
my brother mentioned a story to me.....vietnam vet shoots and kills intruder in home....goes outside and is shot and killed by police....whoops.
 

DaveW

Space Monkey
Jul 2, 2001
8,969
774
Karori, Poneke Te Ika-a-Maui
50/50 call to put this in here or in the "It's not about race" thread.
34 years ago...... A Twitter thread worth reading.

https://twitter.com/nick_kapur/status/1128136868623732736

On this date - May 13, 1985 - Philadelphia Police dropped a bomb from a helicopter on a home owned by radical black nationalist group MOVE, destroying the house, killing 5 adults and 6 children, and causing a fire that burned down 61 black middle class homes.
 

dan-o

Turbo Monkey
Jun 30, 2004
6,451
2,742
The police do claim they applied for a warrant 5 days prior to the raid. If the story of no warrant is true that’s egregious, but the facts aren’t even clear yet.
They had no right to enter the house without a warrant, applied for or not.
She was an idiot for granting them access. Had they forced their way in sans warrant all their evidence would've been inadmissible.
 

DaveW

Space Monkey
Jul 2, 2001
8,969
774
Karori, Poneke Te Ika-a-Maui
Sydney police 'asked boy to hold genitals' during festival search

The first boy, a 14-year-old known as GEN13C, was strip-searched after a sniffer dog came close to him but did not sit down.
The boy was separated from his older brother, taken into a room and told to "hold your d**k and lift your balls up and show me your gooch [slang term for the perineum, area between the anus and genitals]", the inquiry heard.
In his interview with investigators, the boy said he "froze" when asked to do this, leaving him "nervous" and "shaking". He was allowed to leave and enter the festival when "nothing adverse was located".

The second case involved a 16-year-old boy who was strip-searched after security staff spotted him fiddling with a bumbag.
The boy, known as GEN14C, was asked to "lift up his balls" and "squat and cough", the inquiry heard. When asked to do so, GEN14C said: "Why is this happening?"
In the case of GEN15C, a 15-year-old boy, security moved him to a private area, where he was subjected to a strip-search.
The boy was told to lower his shorts, grab his penis and lift it up, the inquiry heard.
"At that time, the male officer inserted his hands - that is, the male officer's hands - inside GEN15C's underwear, making contact with his testicles," Ms Dwyer told the inquiry.
The officer, who was not wearing gloves, did not find any drugs during the search but GEN15C was ejected from the venue, Ms Dwyer said.
 

stoney

Part of the unwashed, middle-American horde
Jul 26, 2006
15,669
2,017
Colorado
So I have a ton of interaction with cops due to my job being govt side of the company. This week I met with a Chief of Police and a half-dozen other cops, the last few weeks probably another 10+. While I generally am not a fan of cops because well, cops, I am finding that the vast majority are pretty fucking normal guys.

One was telling me about when he had to draw on somebody (he's a swat guy) and was doing everything humanly possible to not shoot him. He ended up having somebody bring him a shotgun with rubber pellets so he could use that if necessary. Eventually the guy fell asleep from the drugs he took just before everything started, so he didn't have to do anything. He said that a lot of people (not cops) were giving him shit for not shooting him and letting the situation go on longer than necessary, but he he wants nothing to do with that hanging over him unless he has no other choice. He ended up taking 2 weeks off after that to go backpacking by himself because he was so stressed out from that four hour event.

Most of the other guys are the same way. It's usually the older guys (55+) who should be retiring that seem to be the ones with serious chips on their shoulders. I work with PD's in higher income, suburban communities, so there will be that aspect of the type of interactions they deal with too. But as a whole, in the depts I deal with, the officers just want to do their jobs, not need to have negative interactions with people, hate having to draw on people, and are on the "good cop" end of the scale.

The Chief of Police I think has a lot to do with that though; he doesn't allow for shitty cops in his dept. There was an incident a few years before he was Chief to which he stood up and called people out for doing shit wrong. He got promoted after that and a lot of people got laid-off or retirement bonuses to leave. He's since rebuilt the dept in his vision and the younger officers, a lot are former military, have changed how the policing is done in his dept. He also really focuses on getting those guys ready to retire by 55 (target for cops) so that they don't burn out and get jaded. Most proactive with his staff that I've ever come across.

Maybe RoE from the military and defining what risk is in context of what you've experienced should be a priority...

Just a bit of a ramble, but something I've been thinking about for a while.
 

Jm_

Turbo Monkey
Jan 14, 2002
10,775
2,923
AK
So I have a ton of interaction with cops due to my job being govt side of the company. This week I met with a Chief of Police and a half-dozen other cops, the last few weeks probably another 10+. While I generally am not a fan of cops because well, cops, I am finding that the vast majority are pretty fucking normal guys.

One was telling me about when he had to draw on somebody (he's a swat guy) and was doing everything humanly possible to not shoot him. He ended up having somebody bring him a shotgun with rubber pellets so he could use that if necessary. Eventually the guy fell asleep from the drugs he took just before everything started, so he didn't have to do anything. He said that a lot of people (not cops) were giving him shit for not shooting him and letting the situation go on longer than necessary, but he he wants nothing to do with that hanging over him unless he has no other choice. He ended up taking 2 weeks off after that to go backpacking by himself because he was so stressed out from that four hour event.

Most of the other guys are the same way. It's usually the older guys (55+) who should be retiring that seem to be the ones with serious chips on their shoulders. I work with PD's in higher income, suburban communities, so there will be that aspect of the type of interactions they deal with too. But as a whole, in the depts I deal with, the officers just want to do their jobs, not need to have negative interactions with people, hate having to draw on people, and are on the "good cop" end of the scale.

The Chief of Police I think has a lot to do with that though; he doesn't allow for shitty cops in his dept. There was an incident a few years before he was Chief to which he stood up and called people out for doing shit wrong. He got promoted after that and a lot of people got laid-off or retirement bonuses to leave. He's since rebuilt the dept in his vision and the younger officers, a lot are former military, have changed how the policing is done in his dept. He also really focuses on getting those guys ready to retire by 55 (target for cops) so that they don't burn out and get jaded. Most proactive with his staff that I've ever come across.

Maybe RoE from the military and defining what risk is in context of what you've experienced should be a priority...

Just a bit of a ramble, but something I've been thinking about for a while.
Well, I do too, but then again I got pulled over in Arizona two weeks ago for "having Montana plates". The reason I was pulled over was stated as "I pulled you over because you weren't at least 3 seconds from the car in front of you...and I noticed you had Montana plates". There was no way I wasn't at least "3 seconds" and from my experience in law enforcement and court, I know some bullshit like that would never hold up, even if it was following too close, because you'd have to record it from a perspective that allows you to show it. Of course I didn't get a ticket or even a warning...because dipshit made up a BS reason to pull me over and if they did try to pin something, there's no way I'd let them get away with it in court. It's most likely they were looking for traffickers (had a minivan for my bike).
 

stoney

Part of the unwashed, middle-American horde
Jul 26, 2006
15,669
2,017
Colorado
Well, I do too, but then again I got pulled over in Arizona two weeks ago for "having Montana plates". The reason I was pulled over was stated as "I pulled you over because you weren't at least 3 seconds from the car in front of you...and I noticed you had Montana plates". There was no way I wasn't at least "3 seconds" and from my experience in law enforcement and court, I know some bullshit like that would never hold up, even if it was following too close, because you'd have to record it from a perspective that allows you to show it. Of course I didn't get a ticket or even a warning...because dipshit made up a BS reason to pull me over and if they did try to pin something, there's no way I'd let them get away with it in court. It's most likely they were looking for traffickers (had a minivan for my bike).
I don't challenge that. I've been pulled over for bullshit reasons too. Most of the guys I deal with don't want to be assholes and try to avoid unnecessary shit situations when possible. One of the calls that came in from dispatch yesterday (guys keep the radios on quietly) was a homeless guy chasing people. He made the comment that he hates having to take those guys in because they don't have the ability to help them from their position, but once they start chasing people and doing stupid shit like that, he doesn't have a choice. He also had an old woman run a red then back out of the intersection 2 weeks ago... he pulled her over and she refused to give him ID and called her atty while he was trying to deal with her. Said it was one of the most annoying people he's ever dealt with; would rather deal with guys high as a kite that are reasonable than old rich people. Said he lets a lot of people walk with a warning if they are just reasonable or if he 'has' to write a ticket (quota is real) (ie ran red because braking would have gotten rear-ended), marks it down a lot and tells them what needs to be done to resolve it.