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Mo(n)arch

Turbo Monkey
Dec 27, 2010
4,190
1,115
Italy/south Tyrol
Goddamn, this thing is beautiful. :cupidarrow:


How is the fender mounted? There's some room between the fender and the swingarm, so I don't think it is made in one piece.
 

Udi

RM Chief Ornithologist: “I Brake for Birds”
Mar 14, 2005
4,738
843
Personally I really dig the stainless steel wear plates he added to the chainstay and on the insides of the dropouts.
I don't think those are wear plates on the inside of the dropouts, it seems to be something to protect the frame from the rotor, heat is the only thing I can think of. I can't think of a case where there would be physical contact there.

 

Carnaza

Monkey
Aug 10, 2006
242
0
Santiago, Chile
The fender is bolted to that part that connects both sides of the swingarm.... At least that's was I saw yesterday.... Also the fender fits pretty well in there, so I think that's the reason of the illusion of it being part of the swingarm
 

Mo(n)arch

Turbo Monkey
Dec 27, 2010
4,190
1,115
Italy/south Tyrol
The fender is bolted to that part that connects both sides of the swingarm.... At least that's was I saw yesterday.... Also the fender fits pretty well in there, so I think that's the reason of the illusion of it being part of the swingarm
That's what I thought. Thanks. I think the swingarm would be too difficult to make it in one piece. Even if it's carbon there are some limits in forming limits like there are limits for casted pieces.

every pic i see of this bike makes me want one more...it's incredible.
Well the frame can still selfdestruct for no reason. Revolt also looked good on paper I'm waiting for some real life reviews. Preferably after a full season.
I wanted to buy a Wilson for the season 2013. But I see there is a new contender in town. Hopefully we'll get some real life reviews this season.
 

Udi

RM Chief Ornithologist: “I Brake for Birds”
Mar 14, 2005
4,738
843
perhaps there to keep a bent rotor from sawing the frame.
Yeah maybe that's it. Getting a little excessive there in terms of the whole protecting itself thing, but I suppose on the rare occasion it happened you'd be thankful.
 

p-spec

Turbo Monkey
May 2, 2004
1,287
1
quebec
Yeah maybe that's it. Getting a little excessive there in terms of the whole protecting itself thing, but I suppose on the rare occasion it happened you'd be thankful.
Road bikes have the same thing near the BB erea for wen and if chain possibly falls off.
 

S.K.C.

Turbo Monkey
Feb 28, 2005
4,097
10
Pa. / North Jersey
I don't think those are wear plates on the inside of the dropouts, it seems to be something to protect the frame from the rotor, heat is the only thing I can think of. I can't think of a case where there would be physical contact there.

Actually, those are indeed wear plates! Kevin and I spoke about this, and the one thing that seems to happen when riders remove the rear wheel for service is that occasionally the rotor will scrape the inside of the chainstay and seatstay. To prevent this from happening, Kev added the stainless wear plates - or more accurately - armor plates. =)

Since it's already been let out of the bag, officially the finishes will be:
Satin Black
Carbon Fiber with clear coat (think TLD D3 Carbon Pinstripe helmets)
Glowstick/Flouro Yellow

The fender is an integrated piece meaning it bolts to the swing arm and is removeable.
 
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vinny4130

Monkey
Jun 11, 2007
312
106
albuquerque
out of my dh community we had a few broken revolts, my initial reaction was "whatev dh all bikes crack" that was intill most broke. to me the important part is how the broken frame is delt with by the company. bottom line, a niche maket company like evil should have closed its doors and left everyone with a broken revolt out to dry, that is the real world. i cant imagine the amount of personal money and time kevin has put into resurrecting this brand. if this frame goes to the intended persons it will show that evil puts customer service before profit. the length of time to fix the warranty is pathic but i applaud the diligence. i hope they succeed and people see this as a testament to its customer, and people give them a 2nd chance.
 

frango

Turbo Monkey
Jun 13, 2007
1,456
5
Why is that a problem. Do you predict massivly bending your rotor?
Indeed, I don't. If the rotor is bent so badly, it could touch the frame, it wouldn't go through the caliper, IMO. Unless, the rear triangle is unusually narrow.
 

davetrump

Turbo Monkey
Jul 29, 2003
1,270
0
Indeed, I don't. If the rotor is bent so badly, it could touch the frame, it wouldn't go through the caliper, IMO. Unless, the rear triangle is unusually narrow.

False... it can still flex through caliper even if bent very badly. At speed the wheel will keep going and rotor can hit frames. Not common but it can happen.

Have a look at any DH bike with a large rotor on it. They are all close to the frame. Cosidering the BB standards and rear hub standards that are common on most bikes you don't see a lot of variation in this spacing (as in they are all close)

And most bikes with have small cuts/scratches in the clearcoat from putting the wheel on and nicking it.

Nice touch Evil with the attention to detail.
 

Deano

Monkey
Feb 14, 2011
233
0
i changed my mind, screw waiting till these have been rolling for a year and no issues.. i want one naow !!!
 

fluider

Monkey
Jun 25, 2008
440
9
Bratislava, Slovakia
I don't think those are wear plates on the inside of the dropouts, it seems to be something to protect the frame from the rotor, heat is the only thing I can think of. I can't think of a case where there would be physical contact there.
Heat radiating from rotor? Can you imagine the amount of energy required to influence the carbon on that chainstay when carbon has been well used for braking rotors, and aramid for projectile impact dissipation? Steel rotors we use can bake themself immediately when compared to carbon.

Mega props to Filip Polc for staying in the game and having the chance to race on this alien.
 

iRider

Turbo Monkey
Apr 5, 2008
1,955
323
I think it is hilarious that the same people that go on and on about bad CS from other bike companies now fall over themselves to be first in line to throw money at an unproven bike from a company that is not exactly known for quick warranty replacement. :rofl:

Good looking frame though. :thumb:
 

S.K.C.

Turbo Monkey
Feb 28, 2005
4,097
10
Pa. / North Jersey
HAHA...

Just LoL'ed all over myself...

:rofl:

"HAIL SATIN!" indeed. In a perfect world this would be a Victoria's Secret ad campaign. Doutzen Kroes moving in slo-mo in front of a wind machine wearing satin lingerie while Slayer plays in the background... Someone get Lori Greeley on the phone... this is brilliance.
 

Udi

RM Chief Ornithologist: “I Brake for Birds”
Mar 14, 2005
4,738
843
Actually, those are indeed wear plates! Kevin and I spoke about this, and the one thing that seems to happen when riders remove the rear wheel for service is that occasionally the rotor will scrape the inside of the chainstay and seatstay. To prevent this from happening, Kev added the stainless wear plates - or more accurately - armor plates. =)
Yeah fair enough! I see them being of more use when the rotor bends like suggested further up, but either way it's cool they've covered all the points of frame wear. I really hope the rest of the frame and linkages are strong / durable / reliable enough that people can ride the bikes long enough to benefit from the extra touches.

Heat radiating from rotor? Can you imagine the amount of energy required to influence the carbon on that chainstay when carbon has been well used for braking rotors, and aramid for projectile impact dissipation? Steel rotors we use can bake themself immediately when compared to carbon.
You're comparing a carbon braking rotor to a carbon bicycle frame? I'd suspect these are very different applications, and the layup and laminate/bonding agents are very different in high-heat applications.

I do agree that it would be unlikely to affect it whatsoever, but that doesn't mean a frame can be compared to a rotor.
 

toodles

Turbo Monkey
Aug 24, 2004
2,697
879
Australia
Is it true the drive behind the carbon frame was mainly to lower weight and thus get a saving on the cost of air-freighting warranty frames?
 

Victor

Chimp
Jan 31, 2010
79
0
Arad, Romania
Is it true the drive behind the carbon frame was mainly to lower weight and thus get a saving on the cost of air-freighting warranty frames?
Yeah, because its so much cheaper to make a brand new frame than to make a few more of the same ALU ones :rofl:

Also, just found this pic dsc08018r.jpg


As a kid my parents wouldn't support my hobbies and after I started working I managed to indulge slowly to my cravings, first snowboarding gear, sweet car (bought a Subaru Forester SG model, my fav) and then came the bikes. The Revolt was my first new frame and it arrived after much grief and waiting.

I think that was one of my happiest days, ever :)

I am falling more and more in love with this new carbon one, maybe a new box will arrive this year for me :rolleyes:

P.S. you can see the fender bolt in this pic

img_2148.jpg
 
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Pslide

Turbo Monkey
Sorry guys, TL;DR the whole thread, but have they resolved the issues with the linkage? Forces are really high in this design and I witnessed the link bolts shear on a bottom out, but I think DW said they went to double shear. Has there been any issues with the new linkage?

Got to admit, it's a beautiful bike aesthetically...
 

General Lee

Turbo Monkey
Oct 16, 2003
2,867
0
The 802
Sorry guys, TL;DR the whole thread, but have they resolved the issues with the linkage? Forces are really high in this design and I witnessed the link bolts shear on a bottom out, but I think DW said they went to double shear. Has there been any issues with the new linkage?
Unfortunately not. The links are still at the mercy of internet speculation and couch surfing 1st semester engineering experts who will predict their failure based on grainy photos. Someone will imagine it might break and someone else with poor ability will blame it for bucking them when they grab a fist full of front brake in a panic.

After all, you can't fix stupid.
 

jonKranked

Press Button, Receive Stupid
Nov 10, 2005
55,851
4,790
media blackout
Sorry guys, TL;DR the whole thread, but have they resolved the issues with the linkage? Forces are really high in this design and I witnessed the link bolts shear on a bottom out, but I think DW said they went to double shear. Has there been any issues with the new linkage?

Got to admit, it's a beautiful bike aesthetically...
IIRC the undead is a slightly modified version of the linkage... lower shock mount is no longer on the swingarm, its on the main triangle now.