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F off, I searched. Is there a cast iron thread already?

Nick

My name is Nick
Sep 21, 2001
22,394
11,172
behind you, don't wait up.
I scored two cast iron pans, 1 Griswold 9" and a Griswold 12" ... $30. I think I won here.
That said, I know nothing of 'seasoning' nor cast iron care. Can I just use these things? Wash them?

Hit me with that cast iron knowledge. Thanks.
 

jdcamb

Tool Time!
Feb 17, 2002
18,889
6,938
Nowhere Man!
I scored two cast iron pans, 1 Griswold 9" and a Griswold 12" ... $30. I think I won here.
That said, I know nothing of 'seasoning' nor cast iron care. Can I just use these things? Wash them?

Hit me with that cast iron knowledge. Thanks.
Griswold from Erie PA is the high-end stuff for direct fire Iron pans. #13's pans go for big bucks.
 

Nick

My name is Nick
Sep 21, 2001
22,394
11,172
behind you, don't wait up.
Griswold from Erie PA is the high-end stuff for direct fire Iron pans. #13's pans go for big bucks.
these are stamped Erie PA. holy crap these things are pricey! I got a great deal.
Wipe on olive oil or bacon fat or whatever floats your boat, 350-400 F in the oven for an hour, leave in oven while it cools off, all done.
thanks John!
 

SkaredShtles

I love NEWCASTLE and will ONLY drink NEWCASTLE!!!!
Sep 21, 2003
60,594
9,385
In a van.... down by the river
Once you have them seasoned, don't use soap to clean them. Simply "deglaze" after using by heating very hot and hitting it with water.

I save aluminum foil that has been used for other purposes, wadded in a ball, to "scrub" any stuck bits with plain hot water.

Then heat it up very hot and wipe it with oil.
 

gonefirefightin

free wieners
You might look into sanding them down if they need it before seasoning. I tend to hit all my (new to me) pans and dutch ovens with a series of grits down to 220 before re-seasoning them since most are a bit too pitted or rough for my specific cooking needs. Even the brand new stuff I get from ace needs some treatments. Older ones may not need as much but it definitely makes a difference in the long run for being truly non stick when seasoned
 

Westy

the teste
Nov 22, 2002
50,061
15,488
Sleazattle
Once you have them seasoned, don't use soap to clean them. Simply "deglaze" after using by heating very hot and hitting it with water.

I save aluminum foil that has been used for other purposes, wadded in a ball, to "scrub" any stuck bits with plain hot water.

Then heat it up very hot and wipe it with oil.
I use this method but with soap and a soft nylon brush. Just clean and dry it while still hot. I hit it with a bit of whatever oil is at hand mostly just cooking spray.

Cast iron works well as a cooking surface because the carbon/graphite crystals in it can absorb oil and also have their own lubricant properties. Also why it is used as a cylinder liner in engines.

A lot of people out there aren't cooking on cast iron, they are cooking on years of burnt food on cast iron.
 

Sandwich

Pig my fish!
Staff member
May 23, 2002
19,871
4,005
borcester rhymes
I have a couple of lodge pans. I use them, wash them, and keep them well oiled. They seem to work fine. I still like non-stick for most things.
 

Westy

the teste
Nov 22, 2002
50,061
15,488
Sleazattle
I have a couple of lodge pans. I use them, wash them, and keep them well oiled. They seem to work fine. I still like non-stick for most things.
The type of pan I use depends on what I am cooking. Cast iron for meat, stainless for most stuff, non stick for eggs/bread.
 

Toshi

Harbinger of Doom
Oct 23, 2001
34,334
5,493
I do like not losing that lovely rendered beef fat. On the grill it just gets wasted and causes flare ups if cooking a particularly good piece of meat.
 

jonKranked

Detective Dookie
Nov 10, 2005
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flax seed oil. i can't remember which of the fatty acids it is, but when you heat it hot enough it polymerizes and that's what creates the seasoning. flax oil has the highest concentration of it. warm your skillet slightly (not too hot to touch), coat all the cooking surface with flax, wipe off the extra. place it upside in a cold oven (with a drip pan underneath), set your oven to its max temperature (needs to be at least 500F i think). once it hits temperature, leave it in there for an hour. turn the oven off and let it cool. repeat this 5 times. i've done this with all my skillets that require seasoning and it has always worked.

you *can* clean them with soap, just don't scrub too hard.
 

jonKranked

Detective Dookie
Nov 10, 2005
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if you need to deseason your skillet, i've heard you can put it in your oven on the clean cycle.

i've also heard soaking it in a lye bath works.

take both with a grain of salt, i have not tried either.
 

jdcamb

Tool Time!
Feb 17, 2002
18,889
6,938
Nowhere Man!
Eggs cooked in clarified butter are pretty awesome. French toast also. Rabe with snap peas, fresh ginger, tofu, honey and garlic. Blast of siracha.
 

jonKranked

Detective Dookie
Nov 10, 2005
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Hmm my Le Creuset casserole and saucepans are enamel on the inside but the 12" skillet is seasoned cast iron.
No coating on the inside.
the cast iron skillets they offer now are black enamel coated on the cooking surface. not sure when they stopped offering the version with non-enameled cook surfaces.