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Flipping your stem

Discussion in 'Downhill & Freeride' started by preppie, Jan 15, 2008.

  1. preppie

    preppie Monkey

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    Hi,

    I know that most XC stems can be used upside down.
    But some people have posted that 'some' DH stems aren't designed to be flipped (and they can fail or snap)

    I have an Easton Vice stem : http://www.eastonbike.com/PRODUCTS/STEMS/stem_vice_'08.html

    I was wondering how do you know a particular stem can or can't be used upside down ?
    What's the rule of thumb ?


    Thanks.


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  2. Kevin

    Kevin Turbo Monkey

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    Rule is that if you want a lower bar height you can flip it.
    If you like it keep it and if not flip it right side up.
    Mine has been USD for a while cause I couldnt get the integrated crowns for my 40 and I like it...

     
  3. Steve M

    Steve M Turbo Monkey

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    Some stems can't be easily flipped upside down because the flat area on top of them isn't large enough to clear the top crown of a DC fork (which is a problem you don't have on XC bikes, since the stems are very long and you generally only use SC forks anyway). You can sometimes get around this by putting spacers underneath it, but this may well defeat the point of doing it to begin with. Really depends on the individual stem. At the moment I have a Sunline V-one stem upside down with about 3mm of spacers underneath it to help clear the top crown. Works fine and is still lower than running it right-side-up. Before that I had a Bilt (catalog brand) 70mm stem upside down, that didn't require any spacers under it.
     
  4. pyynö

    pyynö Chimp

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  5. preppie

    preppie Monkey

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    Well, I flipped my stem because my front wheel drifted too much,
    especially in off camber sections and loose stuff.
    My flipped stem did not only improve the front wheel grip,
    it also improved my cornering, pumping and even sprinting.
    Only manuals and the super steep stuff is a little more difficult.

    My only concern is that the Easton Vice stem isn't designed to be flipped.
    I guess it's O.K. because it looks pretty burly and it's 290gr.
    The Easton website says ±10°, so I guess this means + normal and - flipped?

    Thanks
     
  6. DirtyMike

    DirtyMike Turbo Fluffer

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    The easton vice is plenty strong enough to be flipped, but I am unsure if it will fit properly. I would say try it, just make sure its sitting flat before you crank it down so not to accidently damage anything.
     
  7. Kevin

    Kevin Turbo Monkey

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    Yeah because of the shortness and the angle you might have to put a spacer under it and that could take away the advantadge of the flipping. lol
    What fork is it going on?