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Getting into DH?

chance199

Monkey
May 23, 2009
226
0
Port Orchard, WA
so im going to start saving and probably build a Transition Blindside. or maybe a TR450 when it comes out.
anyways, whats a good way to get into DH racing?
good ways to practice, ETC.
just tell me what you think.
 

mtnbiker49

Monkey
Jul 12, 2009
242
0
Milford, PA
Get out and ride the DH that you can. Work on finding your best routes and practice your jumps and turns. Also, depending on where you live, there are camps that help you along with this kind of stuff. If thats what you meant.
BTW, if your starting serious downhill, always ride with someone..
 

chance199

Monkey
May 23, 2009
226
0
Port Orchard, WA
Get out and ride the DH that you can. Work on finding your best routes and practice your jumps and turns. Also, depending on where you live, there are camps that help you along with this kind of stuff. If thats what you meant.
BTW, if your starting serious downhill, always ride with someone..
im in Port Orchard, Washington. i have green mtn like 15 minutes from my house, its a bunch of dirtbike trails so it really rocky and roots
i always ride with someone. and i got Port Angeles a couple hour drive too
 

gemini2k

Turbo Monkey
Jul 31, 2005
3,526
115
San Francisco
Practice fitness and basic skills. Sessioning slalom and pump tracks for endless amounts of hours will do wonders for your DH skills. Being able to through your bike around easily and lean deep into turns will do wonders for your riding. Can't over state how important basic skills are (flat/bermed turning, riding position, technique, manualing, etc.)

Work on shoulder strength too. Dislocated shoulders (or some nagging shoulder injury) are probably the #1 semi serious injury you're almost guaranteed to get, BUT you can do something about it before you injure them! Strength them ahead of time and you'll bounce back quickly or not get hurt at all.
 
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chance199

Monkey
May 23, 2009
226
0
Port Orchard, WA
Practice fitness and basic skills. Sessioning slalom and pump tracks for endless amounts of hours will do wonders for your DH skills. Being able to through your bike around easily and lean deep into turns will do wonders for your riding. Can't over state how important basic skills are (flat/bermed turning, riding position, technique, manualing, etc.)

Work on shoulder strength too. Dislocated shoulders (or some nagging shoulder injury) are probably the #1 semi serious injury you're almost guaranteed to get, BUT you can do something about it before you injure them! Strength them ahead of time and you'll bounce back quickly or not get hurt at all.
ive worked alot at the pump track at Colonnade so ive gotten better at that,
i HAVE to strengthen my shoulder already because i have a strained rotator cuff already which sucks haha.
i work on manuals every day but i SUCK aat them):
 

gemini2k

Turbo Monkey
Jul 31, 2005
3,526
115
San Francisco
nah, you don't have to be great at manualing (hell after 2 YEARS of near constant practicing my best was like 50-60 ft, I'm serious, several days a week, hour or so a day, even in 10 degree Illinois winters, still terrible, god it pisses me off when people can do endless manuals no problem, nothing more pisses me off than that, not even wearing rubbers), but being able to comfortably manual small rollers and things is a good sign. Ya shoulder injuries suck. Dislocated or sublaxed mine a few times. Also try and ride with what I'd call a "smart" fast rider. There are the kinda riders who are like "uhhh I just go fast" and the more calculating kind who focus on technique, consistancy, etc. Try to ride with the later and get feedback on your form. This will help prevent you from developing bad habits. Proper form makes stuff a LOT easier and will prevent you from crashing a lot more than you otherwise would've.
 
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thad

Monkey
Sep 28, 2004
374
13
The best way to get into downhill is to start racing, duh!
The last fluidride cup is this weekend at Mt. Hood. Show up, get a one day license, race beginner, and see how you do.

As a grom starting out racing, your Stinky will be a good bike. No need to buy an expensive race bike as a beginner. Save your money for race license, entry fees, GOOD TIRES (Maxxis Minion STs), and for repairing your bike. Your skills, fitness, mental game, and balls will be holding you back the first season. When you start winning in beginner, then start thinking about a fancy race bike.

Take lots of practice runs. Stop at the side of sections you are having problems with, and watch other racers come thru. See what lines are working.

Meet other kids who are racing. Follow faster riders. Are there any shops in town that have a race team? It makes it alot easier to race if you can car pool, and share tools, rooms, and popup tents.
 

nowlan

Monkey
Jul 30, 2008
496
2
find someone faster than you and try to keep up.
Big Time.

Also research a bit about DH specific fitness, it will do wonders for your riding abilities and your overall stamina which is one of the key aspects to being a fast Downhiller.
 

mccdh

Monkey
Sep 9, 2008
181
0
Comox
riding all types of varying terrain as easily as you can. not saying go try whistler this weekend, and mont sainte anne next weekend. but ride some technical stuff, some steep stuff, some flat stuff. get a good mix, and do roadtrips once in a while. dropping in behind locals on trails new to you will challenge your reaction time and imo make you a better rider based upon how well you can tap into your abilities and push yourself. xc riding will help as well. the technical aspect can transfer through with line choices, tricks and skills riding on rocks/roots etc. but just riding and having fun will push you further than anything.