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Headlights

DirtyMike

Turbo Fluffer
Aug 8, 2005
14,245
833
My own world inside my head
Ok, I have been running extra bright headlights on the scooter for as long as I have owned it. Usualy I run a 90/110 bulb and have a pretty rediculous amount of light on the road. Well last night I had one burn out again, so I decided to try the New Sylvainia SIlverstar headlight, and for a 55/60 bulb, this thing puts out a rediculous amount of light on the road. Well worth the 25 buck per bulb, and if anyone is looking to have brighter lights on tehre Bikes/cars, I would defenetly sugest the silverstar product, extremly bright, and LEGAL, still rates on teh meter as a 55/60 bulb. Good product, works wel.
 

Toshi

Harbinger of Doom
Oct 23, 2001
26,657
1,932
Ok, I have been running extra bright headlights on the scooter for as long as I have owned it. Usualy I run a 90/110 bulb and have a pretty rediculous amount of light on the road. Well last night I had one burn out again, so I decided to try the New Sylvainia SIlverstar headlight, and for a 55/60 bulb, this thing puts out a rediculous amount of light on the road. Well worth the 25 buck per bulb, and if anyone is looking to have brighter lights on tehre Bikes/cars, I would defenetly sugest the silverstar product, extremly bright, and LEGAL, still rates on teh meter as a 55/60 bulb. Good product, works wel.
good suggestion, but the ones that aren't coated "white" (actually blue) can be even brighter.

http://www.danielsternlighting.com/tech/bulbs/blue/good/good.html
 

1453

Monkey
I always found the Xtravisions to be a little brighter and a lot more useful in increment weather than the Silverstars, especially when there is rain or snow, and cuts through fog better. The Silverstars need a specific voltage to run well, you may need to use a relay to rewire the light with thicker gauge wire than stock, otherwise under-driving the bulb will cause it to die prematurely.

I have tried the Xtravision, Silver Star, Silver Star Ultra and Philips Vision plus, the set I use for the rain season is Xtravision. If your light takes H-series bulbs or 9003 then the Osram Silverstar will be good, it doesn't have the blue coating and puts out a lot of light and has a long life, I got mine on ebay, it reduced the glare and puts out more light than the OE bulb on the car I put it in.
 

woodsguy

gets infinity MPG
Mar 18, 2007
1,089
1
Sutton, MA
Here is the results of the Consumer Reports test.

"Premium replacement headlight bulbs are marketed as a functional and cosmetic improvement over the conventional bulbs found in most cars. The bulbs try to mimic the whiter, brighter light of the high-intensity-discharge (HID) lights found on some pricey vehicles. However, while these bulbs emit whiter-looking light, they don’t provide a consistent performance improvement in our tests.

Changes in lighting regulations in the mid-1980s allowed automobile designers to create aerodynamic headlight assemblies. These assemblies use a replaceable halogen bulb rather than an entire replaceable assembly. Headlight performance varies considerably depending on the assembly’s design, including reflector design and lens shape.

Expensive HID lights are a more recent innovation. CR’s tests have shown that HID lights can be brighter, but illuminated distances are often comparable to those of halogen bulbs. Premium halogen replacement bulbs attempt to offer some of the benefits of HID lights while retaining the vehicle’s original headlight assembly.

Bulb replacement is usually a simple task for most backyard mechanics.


MEASURing The LIGHTs

CR tested five premium replacement bulbs, one from each of the top-selling brands: the APC Plasma Ultra White, GE Nighthawk, Philips CrystalVision, Sylvania SilverStar, and Wagner TruView. The bulbs are priced between $26 and $40 a pair (two to three times more than standard bulbs) and are sold in discount or auto-parts stores. All tested bulbs claim Department of Transportation-standard compliance; noncompliant bulbs may be marked as “for off-road use only.”

Tests were both subjective, to determine how well distant objects could be seen by the human eye, and objective, measuring bulb illuminance, or brightness.

Three test vehicles, a Chrysler Sebring, a Toyota Camry, and a Honda Ridgeline, were used to provide a variety of bulb sizes and original equipment (OE) performance.

Headlight distance is vital because the sooner an object is illuminated, the better the chance of avoiding it. Distance is measured outdoors on a moonless night, from a stationary vehicle. Black, unlighted signs were set up at various distances, and engineers recorded which were visible from each vehicle with each set of bulbs. Only one set of bulbs, the Nighthawk, improved low-beam sight distance for one tested vehicle, the Ridgeline. However, they reduced distance on the Camry. Generally, low- and high-beam distance either remained the same or decreased with replacement bulbs.

To test claims of increased brightness, CR measured illuminance, the quantity of light that reaches a particular area. Inside a dark building, a light sensor was placed at a distance 50 feet in front of each vehicle at different heights both on center and 8 feet to the right to simulate a roadway shoulder. Results showed some localized improvements, but no one bulb scored consistently better than OE. The Nighthawk and Plasma Ultra White improved illuminance in more tests than the other bulbs, some of which did not perform as well as stock bulbs.

Subjectively, all five bulbs emitted a whiter light than OE bulbs, which could appeal to buyers seeking the look of HID lights. Studies show that some drivers prefer driving behind whiter light than the more yellow light of most OE halogen bulbs, but that doesn’t mean you can see farther.

Some manufacturers claim that their premium halogen bulbs improve brightness without causing oncoming glare, a common complaint about HID lights. Oncoming glare is caused by a combination of bright lights and an inherent sharp light cutoff. This combination can exist in HID or halogen lights. Most of the tested bulb-vehicle combinations did not cause high levels of oncoming glare. But using whiter premium bulbs in the Honda Ridgeline increased glare to where it could be a discomfort for oncoming drivers.

Our tests showed that while they do yield whiter-looking light, premium aftermarket halogen bulbs don’t offer a consistent performance advantage over original equipment bulbs, and they can perform worse. Much of a headlight’s distribution of light is dictated by its reflector and lens, factors that remain unaffected by changing the bulb. And the combination of higher cost and some manufacturer specifications of a shorter life span than standard replacement bulbs add up to increased costs."
 

DirtyMike

Turbo Fluffer
Aug 8, 2005
14,245
833
My own world inside my head
Nice, Thats alot of the reason I took the m90w headlight back out. And went with a stock wattage light, and in my case anyways, it purs more light on the road with the Silverstar. Very good post