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Is this how it starts?

Pesqueeb

bicycle in airplane hangar
Feb 2, 2007
29,004
4,703
Riding the baggage carousel.
I know its early to speculate, but who wants to lay odds that this was done by a tea bagger?
WASHINGTON — The FBI is investigating the hanging death of a U.S. Census worker near a Kentucky cemetery, and a law enforcement official told The Associated Press the word 'fed" was scrawled on the dead man's chest.

The body of Bill Sparkman, a 51-year-old part-time Census field worker and occasional teacher, was found Sept. 12 in a remote patch of the Daniel Boone National Forest in rural southeast Kentucky. The Census has suspended door-to-door interviews in rural Clay County, where the body was found, pending the outcome of the investigation.

Investigators are still trying to determine whether the death was a killing or a suicide, and if a killing, whether the motive was related to his government job or to anti-government sentiment.

Investigators have said little about the case. The law enforcement official, who was not authorized to discuss the case and requested anonymity, said Wednesday the man was found hanging from a tree and the word "fed" was written on the dead man's chest. The official did not say what type of instrument was used to write the word.

FBI spokesman David Beyer said the bureau is helping state police with the case.

"Our job is to determine if there was foul play involved – and that's part of the investigation – and if there was foul play involved, whether that is related to his employment as a census worker," said Beyer.

Beyer declined to confirm or discuss any details about the crime scene.

Lucindia Scurry-Johnson, assistant director of the Census Bureau's southern office in Charlotte, N.C., said law enforcement officers have told the agency the matter is "an apparent homicide" but nothing else.
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Census employees were told Sparkman's truck was found nearby, and a computer he was using for work was found inside it, she said. He worked part-time for the Census, usually conducting interviews once or twice a month.

Sparkman has worked for the Census since 2003, spanning five counties in the surrounding area. Much of his recent work had been in Clay County, officials said.

Door-to-door operations have been suspended in Clay County pending a resolution of the investigation, Scurry-Johnson said.

The U.S. Census Bureau is overseen by the Commerce Department.

"We are deeply saddened by the loss of our co-worker," Commerce Secretary Gary Locke said in a statement. "Our thoughts and prayers are with William Sparkman's son, other family and friends."

Locke called him "a shining example of the hardworking men and women employed by the Census Bureau."
 

Pesqueeb

bicycle in airplane hangar
Feb 2, 2007
29,004
4,703
Riding the baggage carousel.
I'm still saying it was tea-baggers
BIG CREEK, Ky. — A part-time census worker found hanging in a rural Kentucky cemetery was naked, gagged and had his hands and feet bound with duct tape, said an Ohio man who discovered the body two weeks ago.

The word "fed" was written in felt-tip pen on 51-year-old Bill Sparkman's chest, but authorities have released very few other details in the case, such as whether they think it was an accident, suicide or homicide.

Jerry Weaver of Fairfield, Ohio, told The Associated Press on Friday that he was certain from the gruesome scene that someone killed Sparkman.

"He was murdered," Weaver said. "There's no doubt."

Weaver said he was in the rural Kentucky county for a family reunion and was visiting some family graves at the cemetery on Sept. 12 along with his wife and daughter when they saw the body.

"The only thing he had on was a pair of socks," Weaver said. "And they had duct-taped his hands, his wrists. He had duct tape over his eyes, and they gagged him with a red rag or something."

Two people briefed on the investigation said various details of Weaver's account matched the details of the crime scene, though both people said they were not informed who found the body. The two spoke on condition of anonymity because they were not authorized to discuss the case.

"And they even had duct tape around his neck," Weaver said. "And they had like his identification tag on his neck. They had it duct-taped to the side of his neck, on the right side, almost on his right shoulder."
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Authorities have refused to say if Sparkman was at work going to door-to-door for census surveys before he died.

Both of the people briefed on the investigation confirmed Sparkman's Census Bureau ID was found taped to his head and shoulder area. Weaver said he couldn't tell if the tag was a Census ID because he didn't get close enough to read it. He could see writing on Sparkman's chest, and could read that it said "fed."

Authorities said Thursday that a preliminary cause of death was asphyxiation, pending a full medical examination. Even the details behind that were murky. According to a Kentucky State Police statement, the body was hanging from a tree with a rope around the neck, yet it was in contact with the ground.

Weaver, who works for a family topsoil business in Fairfield, said the body was about 50 yards from a 2003 Chevrolet S-10 pickup truck. He said Sparkman's clothes were in the bed of the truck.

"His tailgate was down," Weaver said. "I thought he could have been killed somewhere else and brought there and hanged up for display, or they actually could have killed him right there. It was a bad, bad scene.

"It took me three or four good nights to sleep. My 20-year-old daughter ended up sleeping in the floor in our bedroom." he said.

Clay County Sheriff Kevin Johnson declined to comment on the investigation because the department is only playing a supporting role but said patrols have increased in the Daniel Boone National Forest since the body was found.

The Census Bureau has suspended door-to-door interviews in the rural county pending the investigation.

State Trooper Don Trosper said it was clear this wasn't a natural death but said all other possibilities were being considered.

"This case has many facets," he said. "To investigate cases, you have to rule out different scenarios. We are not able to rule out many scenarios at this time, and that's what makes this a difficult case."

Although anti-government sentiment was one possibility in the death, some in law enforcement also cited the prevalence of drug activity in the area – including meth labs and marijuana fields – although they had no reason to believe there was a link to Sparkman's death.

"Now they're taking their meth lab operations into the rural, secluded areas," the sheriff said. "We've had complaints in the area, but not that particular location."
Linky
 

ohio

The Fresno Kid
Nov 26, 2001
6,638
4
SF, CA
So following Pelosi's speech on politicians needing to consider the consequences of their words, do you think the liberals will have the balls to go after Bachmann on this?

Roles reversed, Fox would be having a field day with this, but I don't think the liberals can stomach it the same way.
 

Pesqueeb

bicycle in airplane hangar
Feb 2, 2007
29,004
4,703
Riding the baggage carousel.
So following Pelosi's speech on politicians needing to consider the consequences of their words, do you think the liberals will have the balls to go after Bachmann on this?
No. The left will continue to be spineless pvssies. Just like they were with Iraq, and just like they are now with healthcare.

Roles reversed, Fox would be having a field day with this, but I don't think the liberals can stomach it the same way.
Yup. I wonder of this has even been covered on Fox. We don't have TV at my house so I wouldn't know if any major news outlets are even covering this. I caught a piece on the interwebs of coverage by Rachel Madow, but lets face it, thats a pretty small audience. Any major network covering this story? And if it turns out to be tea baggers and the left dosn't pick it up and run with it, then we might as well just hand the keys over to Glenn Beck and find another country to live in, before the trash avalanches start.
 

kidwoo

Celebrating No-Pants Day
Aug 25, 2003
22,543
2,215
In my pants
Yup. I wonder of this has even been covered on Fox. We don't have TV at my house so I wouldn't know if any major news outlets are even covering this. I caught a piece on the interwebs of coverage by Rachel Madow, but lets face it, thats a pretty small audience. Any major network covering this story? And if it turns out to be tea baggers and the left dosn't pick it up and run with it, then we might as well just hand the keys over to Glenn Beck and find another country to live in, before the trash avalanches start.
I have a nasty habit of gluing myself to fox news when I travel and stay in hotels. I was traveling all this past week. No mention on fox. Definitely covered on maddow's show (I literally could not watch all of hannity) so I had a gander at the only decent show on msnbc.

Bachman and glen blech need to fvcking die.
 

rockofullr

confused
Jun 11, 2009
7,356
912
East Bay, Cali
Bachman and glen blech need to fvcking die.
lol! Here is how Time mag describes Beck; "Beck is 45, tireless, funny, self-deprecating, a recovering alcoholic, a convert to Mormonism, a libertarian and living with ADHD"

I sure do wanna listen to what he has to say!! :D
 

kidwoo

Celebrating No-Pants Day
Aug 25, 2003
22,543
2,215
In my pants
I sure do wanna listen to what he has to say!! :D
The difference is of course you can listen to his ramblings with a sense of perspective.

Idaho and Montana shut ins who have probably never even seen a black person or even know what communism is take this retard seriously.
 

$tinkle

Expert on blowing
Feb 12, 2003
14,591
5
is it just me, or does it sound like how you'd get to that-which-shall-not-be-spoken pirate trails?
The cemetery isn’t easy to find; it lies hidden about 100 yards off Arnetts Fork Road, a narrow, winding stretch of pavement that ends abruptly at a grassy clearing, about a mile farther on. Hunkered down along its final half mile are about 15 weathered ranch houses and ramshackle trailers. Most of the families living along the road have been doing so for generations, eking out a hardscrabble existence driving tow trucks or repairing cars or digging up and selling wild ginseng and other herbal roots. Jagged ridges wall off this tiny community, making it a lot like many other places in Clay County—remote, clannish, and foreboding, even to Kentuckians from the next county over.

To reach Arnetts Fork, you must drive two miles into the forest on Big Double Creek Road. In late spring and summer, the thick brush lining the road and a canopy of leaves overhead form a sort of cocoon. Cellphone service is spotty. Outsiders say that if you stumble across any people in these woods, chances are they’re up to no good. It’s the kind of place you don’t go without a gun.
isn't the best riding nowadays mostly through methland?
 

rockofullr

confused
Jun 11, 2009
7,356
912
East Bay, Cali
lol yeah...

If it were a news article I would read it. All I really need here is the facts not verbose descriptions of the community it occurred in followed by the play by play of what some detective did when he showed up at the scene.

Wilson pulled out a pad and pen. He noted that there was excess rope where the knot was secured to the second tree, suggesting it had been tied, then untied, tightened, and retied. The area around the body appeared to be undisturbed, and no tire tracks from vehicles other than Sparkman’s were visible in the clearing. Inside the bed of Sparkman’s truck was a pile of clothes, neatly folded: a pair of navy dress pants, a three-button polo shirt, gray Fruit of the Loom boxer briefs. No shoes. No wallet. That the truck was left untouched struck Wilson as curious. Criminals in the area were known to burn vehicles to eliminate evidence.
If I wanted to read a murder mystery I would go to the library.