Quantcast

Knee replacement

eric strt6

Resident Curmudgeon
Sep 8, 2001
16,179
5,468
directly above the center of the earth
My wife did,it about 3 years ago. She had grade 4 arthritis, walked with a limp, could not hike, snowshoe, bike or ride horses without pain. Now she can do all of that pain free. Her comment is why did I wait so long to do it. Recovery time was about a month due to all the prior fitness work she did regardless of the pain prior to surgery. If the muscles and tendons are fit prior to replacement then recovery should be a snap
 

jonKranked

Press Button, Receive Stupid
Nov 10, 2005
61,644
8,260
media blackout
An old timer dh racer I know just had his done, and is looking forward to racing dh again.

If you have specific questions shoot me a pm.
 

Da Peach

Outwitted by a rodent
Jul 2, 2002
12,931
2,567
North Van
I worked with an older gent (mid 50s) who was an avid skier. He was skiing 3 weeks after his surgery. I was amazed.
 

Westy

the teste
Nov 22, 2002
38,904
5,596
Sleazattle
My dad just got his hip replaced yesterday. Refused pain meds today, claims it hurts a lot less than it did before surgery.

I may be looking at thumb joint replacement here soon.
 

Jm_

Turbo Monkey
Jan 14, 2002
10,752
2,909
AK
Fuck, nothing wrong with my knees but this thread makes me want to upgrade.
 

I Are Baboon

Run, Forrest, Run!
Aug 6, 2001
29,927
2,834
MTB New England
I think left knee replacement for me is inevitable after two total knee reconstructions and the fact that I hammer on it with all the running. I'm just trying to make the most out of it until I can no longer run. My knee hurts every day, and it is especially grumpy these days because I am training hard for a marathon. I could stop with the running and extend the life of my knee, but then who's to say I won't die tomorrow anyway.
 

Westy

the teste
Nov 22, 2002
38,904
5,596
Sleazattle
I think left knee replacement for me is inevitable after two total knee reconstructions and the fact that I hammer on it with all the running. I'm just trying to make the most out of it until I can no longer run. My knee hurts every day, and it is especially grumpy these days because I am training hard for a marathon. I could stop with the running and extend the life of my knee, but then who's to say I won't die tomorrow anyway.
For the right price I can guarantee you will die tomorrow, or by another agreed upon date. But not on any particular date, just by. On a specific date requires an upcharge.
 

jonKranked

Press Button, Receive Stupid
Nov 10, 2005
61,644
8,260
media blackout
I think left knee replacement for me is inevitable after two total knee reconstructions and the fact that I hammer on it with all the running. I'm just trying to make the most out of it until I can no longer run. My knee hurts every day, and it is especially grumpy these days because I am training hard for a marathon. I could stop with the running and extend the life of my knee, but then who's to say I won't die tomorrow anyway.
This is why running is for chumps.
 

jackalope

Mental acuity - 1%
Jan 9, 2004
6,244
3,025
in a single wide, cooking meth...
My Dad, who is 75, had his knee replaced last summer and we just got done with a 4 day trip to Money Mou$e World where we probably walked 5-7 miles each day. His "new" knee was fine, but unsurprisingly the other knee is starting to shit the bed, largely because he favored the original shitty knee for so long - which is to say, if you're already limping around, go ahead and get it done. I will say he was in a great deal of pain for the 1st week or so after the surgery, so much so, he said he'd never get the other one done - although he is now vacillating on that position, so we'll see. He did try the stem cell treatment first, and basically said it seemed like a snake oil scam, as he experienced no benefit (supposedly it can provide some relief in some cases, but it seems like it more of a delaying tactic rather than a long term solution).

As others have already said, modern hip and knee replacement surgeries have improved dramatically over the past 10-15 years, and most seem to be very satisfied with the results.

But again, I was really impressed with how he handled all the walking around Money Mou$e World, so much so, we had a little fun with him on the last day (as we pulled in the sprawling parking lot in the morning, we saw a derelict wheelchair sitting all by its lonesome, so naturally we thought about a "Home Alone" scenario in which we accidently forgot him in the parking lot in our haste to go stand in long lines):




 

jonKranked

Press Button, Receive Stupid
Nov 10, 2005
61,644
8,260
media blackout
My Dad, who is 75, had his knee replaced last summer and we just got done with a 4 day trip to Money Mou$e World where we probably walked 5-7 miles each day. His "new" knee was fine, but unsurprisingly the other knee is starting to shit the bed, largely because he favored the original shitty knee for so long - which is to say, if you're already limping around, go ahead and get it done. I will say he was in a great deal of pain for the 1st week or so after the surgery, so much so, he said he'd never get the other one done - although he is now vacillating on that position, so we'll see. He did try the stem cell treatment first, and basically said it seemed like a snake oil scam, as he experienced no benefit (supposedly it can provide some relief in some cases, but it seems like it more of a delaying tactic rather than a long term solution).
a lot of orthopedic specialists will recommend getting both knees done at once if one is bad and their is high liklihood that other one will need replaced in the future.
 

jackalope

Mental acuity - 1%
Jan 9, 2004
6,244
3,025
in a single wide, cooking meth...
a lot of orthopedic specialists will recommend getting both knees done at once if one is bad and their is high liklihood that other one will need replaced in the future.
I've heard that, although I've also heard they don't push that because it can substantially delay your recovery time due to being bed-bound for awhile after the surgery. Had a co-worker do both at the same time, and he was out of work for at least a month, but when he eventually came back, he was definitely able to ambulate much better.

TBH, I was going to advocate that @johnbryanpeters just amputate and rock a wooden peg leg, which would be part of the master plan to eventually turn him into a pirate. Wonder if he has any arthritis in one of his hands?
 

jonKranked

Press Button, Receive Stupid
Nov 10, 2005
61,644
8,260
media blackout
I've heard that, although I've also heard they don't push that because it can substantially delay your recovery time due to being bed-bound for awhile after the surgery. Had a co-worker do both at the same time, and he was out of work for at least a month, but when he eventually came back, he was definitely able to ambulate much better.
there are definitely tradeoffs. it is a longer recovery time for a double replacement, but a good portion of patients that are candidates for this tend to prefer a longer single recovery, rather than 2 shorter recoveries.
 
I've heard that, although I've also heard they don't push that because it can substantially delay your recovery time due to being bed-bound for awhile after the surgery. Had a co-worker do both at the same time, and he was out of work for at least a month, but when he eventually came back, he was definitely able to ambulate much better.

TBH, I was going to advocate that @johnbryanpeters just amputate and rock a wooden peg leg, which would be part of the master plan to eventually turn him into a pirate. Wonder if he has any arthritis in one of his hands?
The peg leg will be a Falcoln 9.