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Manimal SO wishes he worked in Arizona right now

kidwoo

Celebrating No-Pants Day
Aug 25, 2003
22,535
2,214
In my pants
From the state that brougt you Martin Luther King free scheduling references:

http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/36735281

Ariz. governor signs immigration bill into law
The sweeping legislation makes it a crime under state law to be in the country illegally. It also requires local police officers to question people about their immigration status if there is reason to suspect they are illegal immigrants.

Sorry black guys. Driving while brown just took over.


If I was dark skinned of ANY nationality, I'd get the fvck out of that state. Actually I kind of turn into a person of color during the summer so I better watch out.

All you fat white dipshlts gotta clean your own damn toilets and mow your own goofy misplaced lawns now. Nice work.
 

valve bouncer

Master Dildoist
Feb 11, 2002
7,791
36
Japan
How long before a) the first citizen gets locked up for not showing their papers b)the first law-suit and c) it gets struck down as unconstitutional?
 

stevew

unique white person
Sep 21, 2001
32,252
3,077
Waiting for a birther cop to demand barry's birth certificate the
next time he is in Arizona.
 
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KavuRider

Turbo Monkey
Jan 30, 2006
2,566
3
CT
We were talking about this at the shop last night.

All sorts of fun should result from this...
 

splat

Nam I am
From the state that brougt you Martin Luther King free scheduling references:

http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/36735281






Sorry black guys. Driving while brown just took over.


If I was dark skinned of ANY nationality, I'd get the fvck out of that state. Actually I kind of turn into a person of color during the summer so I better watch out.

All you fat white dipshlts gotta clean your own damn toilets and mow your own goofy misplaced lawns now. Nice work.

Yes this is ludicrous , but why are you saying Manimal should work in Arizona because of this Law ? ?
 

manimal

Ociffer Tackleberry
Feb 27, 2002
7,214
14
Blindly running into cactus
Yes this is ludicrous , but why are you saying Manimal should work in Arizona because of this Law ? ?
because he assumes that my right leaning stance on most issues AND the fact that i am, ironically, a cop (a structurally socialist profession) means that I am automatically a tea partier, immigration nazi, and haven't the ability to form my own opinions on matters involving the constitutionality of such a law, let alone the Fed vs. states rights issues that will likely come of this.

in other words, kidwoo assumes that i dig sheeple like sara palin just as i assume he digs dudes in capris with frosted hair ;)
 

kidwoo

Celebrating No-Pants Day
Aug 25, 2003
22,535
2,214
In my pants
^Yeah what he said.


There's no cock in the world like the cock that emerges from a pair of capris.
 

MikeD

Leader and Demogogue of the Ridemonkey Satinists
Oct 26, 2001
10,290
312
chez moi
It's just ludicrous that there's no centralized reference for birth records for American citizen.

Cops should be able to message the Feds from their cruiser to get a near-instant email with the birth certificate information, dates and numbers of issue/re-issue of the record, and any fraud history associated with it, as easily as they can punch up a state driver's license record. It's just amazing that we don't keep track of who's actually born an American. And that we give citizenship to people born in the States to illegal parents based on a Constitutional clause which was designed entirely to protect against disenfranchisement of former slaves.

Anyone proven to be without legal status coming into contact with any law enforcement for any reason should be immediately detained, turned over to Immigration, and deported as soon as expeditious. Got kids in the States? Sounds like YOUR problem, person who willingly violated the law. Take 'em with you when you leave. You're not even being punished for the felony you committed by crossing the border without perimission--just removed to where you belong. Count yourself lucky.

That said, I've said MANY times that we should be focused not on finding and removing individual illegals (my example above concerns illegals coming into contact with law enforcement for any reason whatsoever, like a traffic stop or domestic violence call), but coming up with a reasonable, workable, and verifiable guest worker status and program, and focusing law enforcement efforts against American companies employing in violation of this new theoretical system, thus drying up the largest market for illegal labor and the biggest source of offensively and illegally sub-standard working conditions in our country. This theoretical system would require individuals to be present in person at a US consulate or embassy in their country of origin to apply, thus leading to self-deportation of the many hard-working people who are just trying to find the best job the can. (Which 80% of the illegals I dealt with in fact were...but that still doesn't give them a right to be present in the US without legal status, or in most cases to commit the various forms of identity fraud and theft that are necessary to be here illegally...)


Ed: Manimal, what state's rights issues do you see with the law? Personally, I think it's neither here nor there, but as the state is setting a condition within its own borders, rather than the Fed imposing it, I don't see any jurisdictional conflict.

Ed II: I think we should have centralized records, mind you, but the burden of proving anything still lies on the government. Anyone within America's borders has the right to say nothing at all to the cops, and no citizen be compelled to carry identification paperwork by federal law.
 
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KavuRider

Turbo Monkey
Jan 30, 2006
2,566
3
CT
It's just ludicrous that there's no centralized reference for birth records for American citizen.

Cops should be able to message the Feds from their cruiser to get a near-instant email with the birth certificate information, dates and numbers of issue/re-issue of the record, and any fraud history associated with it, as easily as they can punch up a state driver's license record. It's just amazing that we don't keep track of who's actually born an American. And that we give citizenship to people born in the States to illegal parents based on a Constitutional clause which was designed entirely to protect against disenfranchisement of former slaves.

Anyone proven to be without legal status coming into contact with any law enforcement for any reason should be immediately detained, turned over to Immigration, and deported as soon as expeditious. Got kids in the States? Sounds like YOUR problem, person who willingly violated the law. Take 'em with you when you leave. You're not even being punished for the felony you committed by crossing the border without perimission--just removed to where you belong. Count yourself lucky.

That said, I've said MANY times that we should be focused not on finding and removing individual illegals (my example above concerns illegals coming into contact with law enforcement for any reason whatsoever, like a traffic stop or domestic violence call), but coming up with a reasonable, workable, and verifiable guest worker status and program, and focusing law enforcement efforts against American companies employing in violation of this new theoretical system, thus drying up the largest market for illegal labor and the biggest source of offensively and illegally sub-standard working conditions in our country. This theoretical system would require individuals to be present in person at a US consulate or embassy in their country of origin to apply, thus leading to self-deportation of the many hard-working people who are just trying to find the best job the can. (Which 80% of the illegals I dealt with in fact were...but that still doesn't give them a right to be present in the US without legal status, or in most cases to commit the various forms of identity fraud and theft that are necessary to be here illegally...)


Ed: Manimal, what state's rights issues do you see with the law? Personally, I think it's neither here nor there, but as the state is setting a condition within its own borders, rather than the Fed imposing it, I don't see any jurisdictional conflict.

Ed II: I think we should have centralized records, mind you, but the burden of proving anything still lies on the government. Anyone within America's borders has the right to say nothing at all to the cops, and no citizen be compelled to carry identification paperwork by federal law.
Wow. Agree 100% :thumb:
 

manimal

Ociffer Tackleberry
Feb 27, 2002
7,214
14
Blindly running into cactus
It's just ludicrous that there's no centralized reference for birth records for American citizen.

Cops should be able to message the Feds from their cruiser to get a near-instant email with the birth certificate information, dates and numbers of issue/re-issue of the record, and any fraud history associated with it, as easily as they can punch up a state driver's license record. It's just amazing that we don't keep track of who's actually born an American. And that we give citizenship to people born in the States to illegal parents based on a Constitutional clause which was designed entirely to protect against disenfranchisement of former slaves.

Anyone proven to be without legal status coming into contact with any law enforcement for any reason should be immediately detained, turned over to Immigration, and deported as soon as expeditious. Got kids in the States? Sounds like YOUR problem, person who willingly violated the law. Take 'em with you when you leave. You're not even being punished for the felony you committed by crossing the border without perimission--just removed to where you belong. Count yourself lucky.

That said, I've said MANY times that we should be focused not on finding and removing individual illegals (my example above concerns illegals coming into contact with law enforcement for any reason whatsoever, like a traffic stop or domestic violence call), but coming up with a reasonable, workable, and verifiable guest worker status and program, and focusing law enforcement efforts against American companies employing in violation of this new theoretical system, thus drying up the largest market for illegal labor and the biggest source of offensively and illegally sub-standard working conditions in our country. This theoretical system would require individuals to be present in person at a US consulate or embassy in their country of origin to apply, thus leading to self-deportation of the many hard-working people who are just trying to find the best job the can. (Which 80% of the illegals I dealt with in fact were...but that still doesn't give them a right to be present in the US without legal status, or in most cases to commit the various forms of identity fraud and theft that are necessary to be here illegally...)


Ed: Manimal, what state's rights issues do you see with the law? Personally, I think it's neither here nor there, but as the state is setting a condition within its own borders, rather than the Fed imposing it, I don't see any jurisdictional conflict.

Ed II: I think we should have centralized records, mind you, but the burden of proving anything still lies on the government. Anyone within America's borders has the right to say nothing at all to the cops, and no citizen be compelled to carry identification paperwork by federal law.
right there with you on this but i can foresee a lawsuit making it's way to the supreme court...just my pessimistic attitude regarding the tenacity of lawyers and the barely legal status of groups like "La Raza".
it pisses me off to no end that i'm often powerless to do anything about blatant fraud perpetrated by illegals; everything from ID theft, to driving charges, to assaults....but barring a violent felony, ICE won't get involved thus requiring me to charge someone who I know is illegal and who will never show up in court for lack of consequence.

Arizona needed something like this; i'm not sure if this was the correct response but at least it sends a message. the landowners and residents of these border towns are tired of having their hands tied when illegals are crossing through their "yards" unchallenged and often armed/carrying drugs.
Those who have never dealt with the headache of trying to identify an illegal who has committed a serious crime...or heck, just trying to ID the driver of a vehicle that has just caused an accident, have no room to talk. it's easy for outsiders to the system to claim that these laws are prejudice without an understanding of how the system is abused by these "innocent immigrants."
 

manimal

Ociffer Tackleberry
Feb 27, 2002
7,214
14
Blindly running into cactus
What the hell stereotype is "frosted hair and wears capris?" :rofl::rofl:
just something i noticed at the International Home Furnishings Market(worlds largest furniture show) that occurs twice a year where I work. Our population nearly doubles twice a year as fashionistas from around the world descend upon our humble little city to buy/sell furniture for their respective corporate entities. i noticed a lot of man-pri's and frosted hair this year by the "fab five" types.

http://www.highpointmarket.org/
 

syadasti

i heart mac
Apr 15, 2002
12,701
290
VT
right there with you on this but i can foresee a lawsuit making it's way to the supreme court...just my pessimistic attitude regarding the tenacity of lawyers and the barely legal status of groups like "La Raza".
it pisses me off to no end that i'm often powerless to do anything about blatant fraud perpetrated by illegals; everything from ID theft, to driving charges, to assaults....but barring a violent felony, ICE won't get involved thus requiring me to charge someone who I know is illegal and who will never show up in court for lack of consequence.

Arizona needed something like this; i'm not sure if this was the correct response but at least it sends a message. the landowners and residents of these border towns are tired of having their hands tied when illegals are crossing through their "yards" unchallenged and often armed/carrying drugs.
Those who have never dealt with the headache of trying to identify an illegal who has committed a serious crime...or heck, just trying to ID the driver of a vehicle that has just caused an accident, have no room to talk. it's easy for outsiders to the system to claim that these laws are prejudice without an understanding of how the system is abused by these "innocent immigrants."
Like MikeD said a majority are here to work hard and honestly. Once NAFTA passed, US policies like corn, soy, and wheat subsidies put literally millions of Mexican farmers out of the job since the US floods their market with crops that are cheaper than they can produce even in Mexico. We are directly at fault and our companies benefit and take further advantage from the illegal labor market.

What about ICE only busting a small number of these workers that work for large companies like Smithfield so these scumbag multinationals can get cheap labor and turn big profits? Why not bust the managers at Smithfield instead for knowingly hiring/creating the illegal worker influx and bad working situations which are often dangerous and do not meet OSHA standards that illegals are powerless to do anything about it. They are just as culpable if not worse than the illegals and so are ICE who agree to serve the companies interests by not doing large raids that would hurt the companies' bottom lines due to lack of workers.
 
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MikeD

Leader and Demogogue of the Ridemonkey Satinists
Oct 26, 2001
10,290
312
chez moi
The issue is that currently, there's really no way to prove a company knowingly hired an illegal.

To get back on my 2005 horse, this should be solved with a biometric ID card for legal immigrants and guest workers. Companies employing such workers would lease, buy, rent, receive, whatever, the government-sealed and tamper-evident equipment to match IDs to owners (fingerprints, retinals, whatever). They get a red light or a green light. Green light means "hire", red means "refer subject to Immigration authorities for further investigation and/or replacement of a defective ID."

These black-box ID machines would remain government property and tampering would be a felony, and they'd be subject to random inspection.

Fines for hiring illegals would have to be severe enough to actually deter a company from doing it, and the guest worker program should be structured that companies repeatedly hiring illegals are excluded from hiring any immigrant labor after a designated number of strikes.

Cops could have the same machines at booking areas, to ensure that any alien taken into custody is legally present and not using a superficially falsified/fake ID to run around the States.

Fact is, currently, it's easy for street gangs and other low-level criminals to produce fake docs good enough to get anyone hired without employers getting in trouble for it. They can't and never will be able to fake a solid biometric ID.
 

sanjuro

Tube Smuggler
Sep 13, 2004
17,411
0
SF
Well, I see illegal immigration to have a positive and a negative.

Obviously, the increased cost of policing and social services is a huge problem. And any group committing crimes, from driving uninsured to drug smuggling and gang warfare, is totally unacceptable.

On the other hand, I depend on immigrant labor for basic services such as cleaning, construction, and moving. Do I check for a green card when I hire someone? No.

And there are so many family and human rights issues which I feel the US does have a responsibility to deal with.

What happens in Arizona will have a direct effect on California, whether it is a barometer for the changes in our laws or will more illegals move to Cali.
 

$tinkle

Expert on blowing
Feb 12, 2003
14,591
5
On the other hand, I depend on immigrant labor for basic services such as cleaning, construction, and moving. Do I check for a green card when I hire someone? No.
ok, so wtf happened in recent history? i'm sure i'm not the only one here who's mowed grass, washed dishes, cleaned floors/bathrooms, or done other chit jobs for a few years.

did we suddenly become soft or too good for getting paid for the same stuff we do @ home (on a smaller scale, yes)?

i don't buy this whole "our economy will collapse if we have to start doing our own gardening & pool cleaning". ffs, we're becoming like canada, only browner & crankier.
 

kidwoo

Celebrating No-Pants Day
Aug 25, 2003
22,535
2,214
In my pants
ok, so wtf happened in recent history? i'm sure i'm not the only one here who's mowed grass, washed dishes, cleaned floors/bathrooms, or done other chit jobs for a few years.

did we suddenly become soft or too good for getting paid for the same stuff we do @ home (on a smaller scale, yes)?
I agree. But add "FOR THOSE WAGES" to that clause and the meaning becomes something a little more defensible. Not by me per se, but more defensible to the spoiled frat boys with an MBA who can't find a job.
 

sanjuro

Tube Smuggler
Sep 13, 2004
17,411
0
SF
ok, so wtf happened in recent history? i'm sure i'm not the only one here who's mowed grass, washed dishes, cleaned floors/bathrooms, or done other chit jobs for a few years.

did we suddenly become soft or too good for getting paid for the same stuff we do @ home (on a smaller scale, yes)?

i don't buy this whole "our economy will collapse if we have to start doing our own gardening & pool cleaning". ffs, we're becoming like canada, only browner & crankier.
The answer is yes.

When I was a kid in New York, immigrant Koreans owned grocery stores and typically worked 100 hours a week. Before that, immigrant Italians did that kind of work.

Do I want to make $8-10 a hour? Or better yet, am I willing to live a lifestyle on $250-300 a week?

I don't think anyone who is capable of dragging their asses thousands of miles to a new country is lazy, and I certainly want them to help with the menial labor tasks that I can barely do myself.
 

rockofullr

confused
Jun 11, 2009
7,356
912
East Bay, Cali
When I was a kid in New York, immigrant Koreans owned grocery stores and typically worked 100 hours a week. Before that, immigrant Italians did that kind of work.
Do you have some sort of proof that they were here illegally? Believe it or not some people come to this country with papers (even Italians).

If they were business owners then they were probably legal immigrants.
 

sanjuro

Tube Smuggler
Sep 13, 2004
17,411
0
SF
Do you have some sort of proof that they were here illegally? Believe it or not some people come to this country with papers (even Italians).

If they were business owners then they were probably legal immigrants.
Or as the great RM philosopher once said:

"I won't eat fruit unless it was picked by American hands"

- TheMontashu
 

kidwoo

Celebrating No-Pants Day
Aug 25, 2003
22,535
2,214
In my pants
Do you have some sort of proof that they were here illegally? Believe it or not some people come to this country with papers (even Italians).

If they were business owners then they were probably legal immigrants.
Hey, he was a kid. He completely grasped the concept of work visas and could tell the number of hours someone worked just by smelling them.
 

sanjuro

Tube Smuggler
Sep 13, 2004
17,411
0
SF
My thing about "illegal immigrants" is that I figure if they are here, keep 'em.

I know I can't justify it, and I would like to see more effort to keep them out.

But these people aren't Al-Queda sleeper agents but someone who wants a better life for him/herself and their families.