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McLeods

boostindoubles

Nacho Libre
Mar 16, 2004
5,236
2,834
Yakistan
I like my rogue hoe. I like the nupla also. The nupla developed play at the bushing but it still works fine. The rogue hoe has so many options, especially for the handle. The different handles really change the character of the tool. Also the many different heads make it hard to pick one. I like the 54" handles for raking. The travis tool is cool cause it has a rake/hoe/ and wide tooth pick.
 

Jm_

sled dog's bollocks
Jan 14, 2002
13,217
4,982
AK
I dunno, I think McLeods and the heavy hoes are fairly different tools, the hoe being sort of an expanded sharp pulaski that can attach heavy rooted hills and the McLeod better for finishing work in soft dirt. If it was too heavy, I'm not sure if it would work as well for that role. I think the narrower angled face of the hoe really helps for the intended purpose, while the flat lighter blade of the mcleod is more for the easier trailwork. Be interesting to hear your thoughts.
 

Jm_

sled dog's bollocks
Jan 14, 2002
13,217
4,982
AK
I actually managed to find the Mcleod today - right where I always keep it. Old age is hell... might wind up getting one closer to the Pulaski 'cause I'm doing rooty sidehill work now...
That sounds like the one I want, heavy hoe on one side, pulaski on the other, should be tits for chopping through stuff. I don't think anyone around here carries them.
 

amishmatt

Turbo Monkey
Sep 21, 2005
1,220
362
Lancaster, PA
I really like my HR70 for a go to single tool. If I'm just walking trails repairing sections and don't want to carry more than one thing, it covers my needs pretty damn well. Cuts way better than a Mcleod, and tamps almost as well. I have a bunch of Mcleods in my allotment of the club's tools, but I never use one as there's always a better option, IMO.

If I have the option for multiple tools, and I usually do, , I'd rather have a stardard 70H hoe with the axe handle, a pulaski and my BTR trail tool.
 

JustMtnB44

Monkey
Sep 13, 2006
782
68
Pittsburgh, PA
I've never been a fan of regular McLeods, they just don't seem that useful to me when I have used them. They generally aren't sharp enough to cut through anything so it basically becomes a tool to push/rake/tamp dirt. I do have one of the Rogue 70HR versions and it is much better because it is a lot sharper and better at cutting through dirt and small roots, while still being able to move dirt and tamp it. It works well for light bench cutting, scraping areas that don't need a lot of benching, and cleaning out drains of muck and wet leaves.

I have many Rogue hoe tools at my disposal for maintaining my local park.
  • My all time go-to tool is still the Rogue 70H, there isn't anything it can't do for basic trail building and maintenance needs.
  • If I'm in a rocky area then I sometimes grab the Rogue 60A tool, the pick side is useful to break up soft rocks like shale and slate. For areas that are only dirt then this tool is not as useful as the 70H as it doesn't cut deep enough.
  • I have an 80R hoe for building berms or bench cutting on steep, soft hillsides. It moves a lot of dirt.
  • The 55HX stays the sharpest of the bunch, and is my go to tool for areas with lots of roots, hardpack soil, or dense areas of small saplings or invasive bushes that need to be chopped out. I don't use the axe side as much as I thought I would, but it can be useful for chopping out stumps or rotted deadfall.
 

SpeedyChix

Chimp
Jul 15, 2007
3
2
Midwest
These are my go-to trail tools. The Rogue 70H stands above all, it's the first tool I'll grab when I'm heading out with a single piece.
Folding saw sees a fair amount of use as do some ratcheting pruners.

 

MrBaker87

Monkey
Mar 30, 2014
138
93
neverlandranch
I've never been a fan of regular McLeods, they just don't seem that useful to me when I have used them. They generally aren't sharp enough to cut through anything so it basically becomes a tool to push/rake/tamp dirt. I do have one of the Rogue 70HR versions and it is much better because it is a lot sharper and better at cutting through dirt and small roots, while still being able to move dirt and tamp it. It works well for light bench cutting, scraping areas that don't need a lot of benching, and cleaning out drains of muck and wet leaves.

I have many Rogue hoe tools at my disposal for maintaining my local park.
  • My all time go-to tool is still the Rogue 70H, there isn't anything it can't do for basic trail building and maintenance needs.
  • If I'm in a rocky area then I sometimes grab the Rogue 60A tool, the pick side is useful to break up soft rocks like shale and slate. For areas that are only dirt then this tool is not as useful as the 70H as it doesn't cut deep enough.
  • I have an 80R hoe for building berms or bench cutting on steep, soft hillsides. It moves a lot of dirt.
  • The 55HX stays the sharpest of the bunch, and is my go to tool for areas with lots of roots, hardpack soil, or dense areas of small saplings or invasive bushes that need to be chopped out. I don't use the axe side as much as I thought I would, but it can be useful for chopping out stumps or rotted deadfall.
This is all true.

A mccloed has little use to me except as a tamp or a (shitty) rake. Can be used to do a little shaping as well. The rogue mccloed, which I own in addition to other rogue tools, is one of the worst offenders in that the head is not flat not large enough to be an effective rake or tamp.
 

Jm_

sled dog's bollocks
Jan 14, 2002
13,217
4,982
AK
IDK, in our soft-dirt trails, the McLeaud is the go-to tool, jack of all trades and does a great job of finishing machine-built trails.

In the harder stuff, no contest, a good solid hoe seems to be the ticket.

I've cut through huge freaking trees with my silky saw. It's kind of ridiculous.
 

boostindoubles

Nacho Libre
Mar 16, 2004
5,236
2,834
Yakistan
In the foothills around here it really depends on the work. If it's scratching in a new trail, the travis tool or mcleod is the ticket. If it's wet-dirt-side-hill-bench-cutting, the hoe can really move dirt. The mcleod works also. We have hoes and Mcleods. The standard rogue Mcleod with a 54" handle ends up in my hands more than anything. I should mention I have needed wire cutters way more times than I have needed saws or pruners. There are no trees.
 

boostindoubles

Nacho Libre
Mar 16, 2004
5,236
2,834
Yakistan
Besides trail building we use hand tools on the farm like crazy. We go through spade shovels, alot. They break in the handle and the head in different places all the time. I bought a Nupla ergo power shovel for the crew to see if the yellow handle could take the use. Sure enough the head died and we put a vintage spade head on that is tough. Best handle we have used so far.

http://www.nuplacorp.com/products/ergo-power-round-point-shovels/
 

AngryMetalsmith

Business is good, thanks for asking
Jun 4, 2006
16,999
3,893
I have no idea where I am
I've got the Rogue Hoe 70HR and am on my second Ash handle. I keep it axe sharp so roots are no match for it. Great for benching and general shaping.

Wouldn't mind one of the Trail Boss tools but they are a bit too expensive. For the cost of one tool I could stash several Rogues or Nuplas without worrying about them disappearing.