Quantcast

Nobody's Food...

Nobody

Danforth Kitchen Whore
Sep 5, 2001
1,481
3
Toronto
Jr_Bullit said:
Sounds like you're looking for our weekly solution for beef....:D T-Bones with a nice fat eye of round...<snip> - that with a caesar on the side and you're golden....</snip>
Thanks for checking it out, babe.

You NEED to take a pic of your steak for me - sometimes I'm purely visual...

Oh, and Caesar Salad... Heh, time to re-write that one...

I'm thinking of doing a Jamaican Jerk Chicken Caesar Salad tomorrow for my Jamaican GF - I've just GOT to record it!
 

Jr_Bullit

I'm sooo teenie weenie!!!
Sep 8, 2001
2,028
0
North of Oz
Dinner was a hit! (Of course, you knew that) Steve only took one pic...and that was of me getting the fresh thyme to just the right texture. :) But the sauce, holy cow...the sauce...light and fragrant, and everyone was taking spoonfuls of it.
BTW - thanks for the tip re: the shrimpies...it became an egg hunt through the sauce to find the handful of prawns I tossed in.
Everyone chowed through the goodies, even my simple salad and the piles of strawberries I set out.
Steve made Mojitos for everyone to enjoy pre-dinner...and we had Spanish coffees after dinner while watching a movie.

All in all, while a very late night, it went very well...:D
 

Attachments

Nobody

Danforth Kitchen Whore
Sep 5, 2001
1,481
3
Toronto
Ingredients:

2 tsp California garlic powder (probably any garlic powder, not garlic salt, will do*)
1 TBS plus 1 tsp coarsely ground coriander seeds
2 TBS coarse (kosher or sea) salt
1 TBS plus 1 tsp dill weed
1 TBS plus 1 tsp paprika
1 TBS plus 1 tsp crushed red pepper flakes (or cayenne pepper)
1 TBS plus 1 tsp freshly ground (coarse) black pepper

Mix all & store in a glass container.

*I've noticed that California GP seems to be more granular and less powdery. It may be a 'coarse grind' although I've never seen a Garlic Grinder, so I can't tell you more than that. I used to buy my CGP at Trader Joe's - price was reasonable and the container, glass, was better at keeping it dry than plastic baggies were.
 

ito

Mr. Schwinn Effing Armstrong
Oct 3, 2003
1,709
0
Avoiding the nine to five
Sauce.

I used about 1/4 cup of decent, spicy and smoky barbecue sauce - this is the distinctive flavor base. I also added about 3 tablespoons of 'pureed' chipotle peppers in adobo sauce.
I'm hoping you meant 3 teaspoons. Otherwise you must have a metal mouth or drastically cooler chipotle peppers. I added 3 tablespoons to my sauce (had more sauce than you had) and pretty much caught my mouth on fire while taste testing. I like hot stuff, but that is some heavy sh!t!!

Otherwise, I'm putting the pizzas together now for some friends, I cut the heat on the sauce a lot. Thanks for the idea.

The Ito
 

SkaredShtles

I love NEWCASTLE and will ONLY drink NEWCASTLE!!!!
Sep 21, 2003
56,391
7,065
In a van.... down by the river
Nobody said:
Ingredients:

2 tsp California garlic powder (probably any garlic powder, not garlic salt, will do*)
1 TBS plus 1 tsp coarsely ground coriander seeds
2 TBS coarse (kosher or sea) salt
1 TBS plus 1 tsp dill weed
Uhhhhhhh....... huh...... huh. Dill weed. :D
 

Nobody

Danforth Kitchen Whore
Sep 5, 2001
1,481
3
Toronto
ito said:
I'm hoping you meant 3 teaspoons. Otherwise you must have a metal mouth or drastically cooler chipotle peppers. I added 3 tablespoons to my sauce (had more sauce than you had) and pretty much caught my mouth on fire while taste testing. I like hot stuff, but that is some heavy sh!t!!

Otherwise, I'm putting the pizzas together now for some friends, I cut the heat on the sauce a lot. Thanks for the idea.

The Ito
I may be highly tolerant to capsaicin, but I'm not always so - sometimes hot is just HOT.

Always adjust heat to your preferences, but, sadly, this requires tasting things that might take the top of your head off...
 

Nobody

Danforth Kitchen Whore
Sep 5, 2001
1,481
3
Toronto
SkaredShtles said:
Interesting. The chipotle/adobo I've used has been fairly innocuous.
Yeah, I find the generic canned chipotle to be just slightly hotter than the same quantity of jalapenos.

But then, I lived in SoCal for a long, long time. That could be a factor...
 

ito

Mr. Schwinn Effing Armstrong
Oct 3, 2003
1,709
0
Avoiding the nine to five
Nobody said:
Yeah, I find the generic canned chipotle to be just slightly hotter than the same quantity of jalapenos.

But then, I lived in SoCal for a long, long time. That could be a factor...
I grew up in Santa Barbara too. I'm very used to eating hot foods (I can down a raw jalapeno without much of a problem). Following your recipe I think I would have killed the two girls I fed these pizzas to. Must have been the chipotles, though perhaps spreading them thinner would have been the answer.

However the pizza did end up kicking ass once I mellowed out the sauce. I used 6 inch pitas and made personal pizzas. Followed by about 4 six packs of beers and a nice salad we were sitting pretty. Thanks! My next attempt will be the pasta in your first post.

The Ito
 

Nobody

Danforth Kitchen Whore
Sep 5, 2001
1,481
3
Toronto
ito said:
I grew up in Santa Barbara too. I'm very used to eating hot foods (I can down a raw jalapeno without much of a problem). Following your recipe I think I would have killed the two girls I fed these pizzas to. Must have been the chipotles, though perhaps spreading them thinner would have been the answer.

However the pizza did end up kicking ass once I mellowed out the sauce. I used 6 inch pitas and made personal pizzas. Followed by about 4 six packs of beers and a nice salad we were sitting pretty. Thanks! My next attempt will be the pasta in your first post.

The Ito
ex-SB'ian? Small world.

Anyway - Were you using your own Chipotles, or were they, in fact, out of one those small cans in the Adobo sauce? I can recall using, in SB, the Embasa brand, but up here in the Frosty North, I'm using La Costena - maybe the Embasa are hotter. Not much choice in Canada as there are a very few native Mexicans here, compared to virtually every other nationality...
 

ito

Mr. Schwinn Effing Armstrong
Oct 3, 2003
1,709
0
Avoiding the nine to five
Nobody said:
ex-SB'ian? Small world.

Anyway - Were you using your own Chipotles, or were they, in fact, out of one those small cans in the Adobo sauce? I can recall using, in SB, the Embasa brand, but up here in the Frosty North, I'm using La Costena - maybe the Embasa are hotter. Not much choice in Canada as there are a very few native Mexicans here, compared to virtually every other nationality...
Ya, they are Embasa brand. Great flavor in that little can.

Mucho Gracias!

The Ito
 

Nobody

Danforth Kitchen Whore
Sep 5, 2001
1,481
3
Toronto
Ingredients:

2 eggs, Large to Extra Large, Room Temperature.
2 tbs water.
1-2 tbs butter
2-3 jots hot sauce
1 tsp salt

Equipment:

9" Non-Stick Frying pan.
Heat (medium)
Spatula (safe for Non-Stick)
Bowl
Fork

Method:

Two eggs, my friends. Not three or four or six. I don't care how many people are getting an omelet, you don't make a huge one and chop it up - that's called a Frittata or 'scrambled eggs*'.

No cream or milk, just a little water.

Start with:

Bowl and Eggs.


Crack Eggs into Bowl. Add Water.


Add Jots of Hot Sauce.


Add a pinch or two of Salt [Kosher is easiest to use with your hands].


Mix like crazy with the fork. Add a little air in the form of bubbles. It's all good.


It should look like this:


Now, Heat the Pan over the element and when hot but not really really freakin' hot, add the butter and swirl it around. You don't want it to brown too much.


Pour the egg mixture into the Pan and let it spread out. Use the Spatula to pull in some of the edges, then tilt the Pan to allow the uncooked mixture to run to the now-cleared areas. Do this only once per 'edge'.


It should now look like this:


Okay, I'm afraid i'll have to shoot another one because I ended up eating this one. I'll finish the recipe by tomorrow...

But this is the stage where you add some cheese etc.

Then, i'll figure out a way to show people how to easily flip the omelet out of the pan.
 

Nobody

Danforth Kitchen Whore
Sep 5, 2001
1,481
3
Toronto
Well, yes.

Here's a fairly simple one...

Ingredients:

1 (4-pound) boneless pork loin
2 tbs Dijon mustard
2 tbs chopped red onion
2 tsp kosher salt
1/2 tsp freshly ground black pepper (or more to taste)
2-3 clove garlic, minced
2-3 tbs coarsely chopped rosemary sprigs, plus a few whole sprigs for garnish

Equipment:

Roasting Pan
Roasting Pan Rack
Pointy Meat Thermometer
Oven

Method:

Preheat oven to 350 degrees F.

Trim any excess fat from the pork loin. Now, remember that pork loin is essentially fat-free. That means you have to be very careful with it as overcooking is just too easy and the meat will be dry and tough to chew.

If you think your oven-roasting skills tend towards over-cooking, you can 'bard' the loin by adding a few strips of bacon along the top.

Evenly rub the entire pork loin with the Dijon mustard followed by the onion, salt, pepper, and garlic. Make sure to really rub in the spices, and then sprinkle the rosemary evenly all over the top.

Place the pork in roasting pan lined with the rack and roast for 20 minutes.

Reduce the temperature to 300 degrees F, and continue roasting until a meat thermometer inserted in the thickest part reads 145 degrees F, about 1 hour more.

Critical to all Roasts: Transfer the pork to a cutting board, cover loosely with foil, and let rest for 10 minutes.

Slice and pork and arrange on a platter garnished with rosemary sprigs.

I do that one fairly often during the autumn...
 

DaveW

Space Monkey
Jul 2, 2001
9,510
1,161
Karori, Poneke Te Ika-a-Maui
Nobody said:
Well, yes.

Here's a fairly simple one...

Ingredients:

1 (4-pound) boneless pork loin
2 tbs Dijon mustard
<SNIP>
Slice and pork and arrange on a platter garnished with rosemary sprigs.

I do that one fairly often during the autumn...

Tried this one last weekend, it was pretty good served it with....
Roasted Kumara (local kind of sweet potaote) in a pacific glaze (passion fruit and brown sugar), a simple salad of rocket and baby spinach leaves and acompanied by a bottle of Pinot Gris. :thumb:

Excellent pork recipe I recomend it to anyone! :D
 

Nobody

Danforth Kitchen Whore
Sep 5, 2001
1,481
3
Toronto
So, here's the Sangria Recipe again...

Bolo's Sangria - Bobby Flay.

2 - bot dry white wine
3/4 - cup brandy
1/2 - cup triple sec
3/4 - cup simple syrup (equal amounts sugar and water heated until sugar is dissolved - do this slowly so you don't burn the sugar)

3 - 4 white peaches, skinned, pureed (or 1 cup peach nectar)
3 - oranges sliced thin rounds
3 - green apples cored, sliced thin
2 - lemons sliced thin rounds
4 - peaches pitted, sliced thin

Combine all ingredients in a large pitcher. If using fresh peaches, taste for sweetness and add more syrup, if needed.

Refrigerate, covered, 2 hours or up to 2 days. Serve over ice.

Pics on Monday, I promise.
 

Nobody

Danforth Kitchen Whore
Sep 5, 2001
1,481
3
Toronto
MMcG said:
Nice. what if you are filling the omelet though? put the fillins in the pan and then still do the flip?
That particular omelet was just some cheddar cheese [which you all know is naturally white colored, right? Orange coloring (from annatto seeds)is only added for market identification of certain types of cheddar.]

Whatever filling you're using, try to spread it out thinly and evenly. You don't necessarily want a 'burrito' - and i'd be personally embarrassed to create that by accident - but if some of the filling, such as cubed ham, etc, is 'dense' or heavy, limit it to the side that will be on the bottom on the plate.
 

MMcG

Ride till you puke!
Dec 10, 2002
15,455
9
Burlington, Connecticut
Nobody said:
That particular omelet was just some cheddar cheese [which you all know is naturally white colored, right? Orange coloring (from annatto seeds)is only added for market identification of certain types of cheddar.]

Whatever filling you're using, try to spread it out thinly and evenly. You don't necessarily want a 'burrito' - and i'd be personally embarrassed to create that by accident - but if some of the filling, such as cubed ham, etc, is 'dense' or heavy, limit it to the side that will be on the bottom on the plate.

I made a few yesterday for lunch - YUM! Question - what is the ideal size pan for two egg omeletes? One of our pans is a little small, and the other just a little big I think, but they still came out mighty tasty!
 

Nobody

Danforth Kitchen Whore
Sep 5, 2001
1,481
3
Toronto
MMcG said:
I made a few yesterday for lunch - YUM! Question - what is the ideal size pan for two egg omeletes? One of our pans is a little small, and the other just a little big I think, but they still came out mighty tasty!

Best size is the 9" - 10" offered by most companies. The very bottom, pre-curve-up of the sides, should be just beyond the stretch of a man's hand.

Non-stick preferable.
 

MMcG

Ride till you puke!
Dec 10, 2002
15,455
9
Burlington, Connecticut
thanks - how about some tasty grillin recipes for the summer time - maybe some chicken recipes.

Got any good rub concoctions for chicken or pork, etc. etc?

I know it is probably lame, but I'm going to cook up a beer can chicken tonight.
 

Nobody

Danforth Kitchen Whore
Sep 5, 2001
1,481
3
Toronto
MMcG said:
thanks - how about some tasty grillin recipes for the summer time - maybe some chicken recipes.

Got any good rub concoctions for chicken or pork, etc. etc?

I know it is probably lame, but I'm going to cook up a beer can chicken tonight.
No, i'm kinda interested in the fad - they're starting to sell the can-cone-grid thing up here now...

I'll look into the rubs - but remember, if I'm the guy making it, it's 'cuz i couldn't find any that I liked - which means these will likely be complicated.
 

TreeSaw

Mama Monkey
Oct 30, 2003
16,926
745
Dancin' over rocks n' roots!
Nobody said:
So, here's the Sangria Recipe again...

Bolo's Sangria - Bobby Flay.

2 - bot dry white wine
3/4 - cup brandy
1/2 - cup triple sec
3/4 - cup simple syrup (equal amounts sugar and water heated until sugar is dissolved - do this slowly so you don't burn the sugar)

3 - 4 white peaches, skinned, pureed (or 1 cup peach nectar)
3 - oranges sliced thin rounds
3 - green apples cored, sliced thin
2 - lemons sliced thin rounds
4 - peaches pitted, sliced thin

Combine all ingredients in a large pitcher. If using fresh peaches, taste for sweetness and add more syrup, if needed.

Refrigerate, covered, 2 hours or up to 2 days. Serve over ice.

Pics on Monday, I promise.
Yum! I do love a tasty sangria!
 

Nobody

Danforth Kitchen Whore
Sep 5, 2001
1,481
3
Toronto
Crepes, hunh? Yeah, they're actually pretty easy. Sort of. Gimme a week.

Tidbit of useless info [unless you're me]: Crepes in Italy (crespelle) are used in Cannelloni (US: Manicotti) in a lot of places. Much lighter in the tum-tum than the big tubi pasta, in my opinion...
 

Nobody

Danforth Kitchen Whore
Sep 5, 2001
1,481
3
Toronto
(i think this one got deleted somewhere...)



Ingredients:

For the Port Reduction Sauce:

1 bottle Red Port Wine
1 small onion, quartered
2 celery stalks, chopped
2 carrots, peeled and chopped
1 bay leaf

A note on the wine reduction:
Don't fixate too much on the port [or any wine] reduction being very 'saucy' - I've struggled with this for years. You will never get it to 'thicken' to where you think it should go - without adding a thickener. This is because a) there is very little sugar in the sauce and b) sugars, when hot, are not viscous.

The original recipe is about 10 years old. Depending on your tastes, you can thicken a bit with mild Dijon mustard, a few teaspoons, during the latter part of the reduction [whisk it in] or - after it's started to cool, yoghurt or sour cream. You don't really want a gravy, so don't use starches - they just glop onto the beans. [adding this to the original recipe now, btw]


For the Ragout:

3 tablespoons olive oil
2 tablespoons chopped shallots
1 pound shiitake mushrooms, cleaned, steamed and thinly sliced
Salt and freshly ground black pepper
1 teaspoon chopped garlic
2 cups cooked navy white beans (or warm, from a can - not dried!)
2 cups veal reduction (preferred, but you can use any Stock]
1 tbs finely chopped fresh parsley leaves
1 tbs butter

Optional Garnish:

1 bunch of green onions

Salmon:

4 (6-ounce) salmon fillets, skin off
Creole seasoning

How To:

In a saucepan, over medium heat, combine the wine, onions, celery, carrots and bay leaf.

Bring to a boil, reduce heat to medium low and simmer until the liquid reduces by half, about 35 to 40 minutes.

Remove from the heat and strain. Set aside, keeping warm.

In a large sauté pan, over medium heat, add 1 tablespoon of the oil.

Add the shallots and mushrooms. Season with salt and pepper. Sauté until the mushrooms start to wilt, about 3 to 4 minutes.

Stir in the garlic and white beans. Season with salt and pepper. Sauté for 1 minute.

Add the veal reduction. Bring to a simmer and cook for 8 minutes. Remove from the heat and stir in the parsley and butter. Set aside, keeping warm.

Season both sides of the salmon with Creole seasoning.

In a large sauté pan, over medium heat, add the remaining 2 tablespoons of the oil. When the oil is hot, add the salmon and sear for 4 to 5 minutes on each side for medium rare.
Plating Up:

Spoon some of the mushroom/bean Ragout in the center of each plate. Lay the salmon fillets on top of the beans. Drizzle some of the Port Reduction over each salmon fillet. Garnish with green onions.
 
Last edited:

MMcG

Ride till you puke!
Dec 10, 2002
15,455
9
Burlington, Connecticut
Nobody - can you give us some tasty recipes featuring beer in the mix.....and I don't mean beer battered fish or beer in chili. What other cool recipes can we make featuring beer as an ingredient?
 

Nobody

Danforth Kitchen Whore
Sep 5, 2001
1,481
3
Toronto
MMcG said:
Nobody - can you give us some tasty recipes featuring beer in the mix.....and I don't mean beer battered fish or beer in chili. What other cool recipes can we make featuring beer as an ingredient?
Well there's a few famous (on Ridemonkey, anyway) Cheddar-Ale soups and their variants...

Bikegeek posted this onelast fall, i think.

I've done 'pulled pork' in beer...

I think i've posted a Guinness Irish Stew... mebbe deleted or something...

Basically, you can substitute different beers for other liquids in strong flavored sauces.

The stronger the flavor of the 'meat' or whatever, then the more full bodied the beer.

I used a hell of a lot of Corona when grilling in Santa Barbara - a trick was to open a bottle the day before and let it get 'flat' then keep it by the grill to 'soak' down the dry side when flipping steaks or big tri-tip roasts. [fizzy wouldn't soak into the meat as easily].

Another use for beer is in cheese sauces - a derivative from fondue's and the original Welsh Rarebit.

You can 'braise' with beer, such as baby back ribs, etc.

I did a salmon in a foil packet a while back with beer instead of wine... interesting experiment and quite affordable.

What's your bent?
 

MMcG

Ride till you puke!
Dec 10, 2002
15,455
9
Burlington, Connecticut
That Guinness Stew would be cool, although I already have it.

I dunno, I was just drinking a good beer last night so it got me to thinking of cooking with beer and that I should do it more often.
 

Nobody

Danforth Kitchen Whore
Sep 5, 2001
1,481
3
Toronto
MMcG said:
That Guinness Stew would be cool, although I already have it.

I dunno, I was just drinking a good beer last night so it got me to thinking of cooking with beer and that I should do it more often.
Well, right now, with the grill season almost overwhelmingly pervasive, I'm using beer to brine chicken.

Ingredients:

1 tbs whole black peppercorns
2 sprigs fresh thyme
2 to 3 bay leaves
6 cloves garlic, peeled and sliced (or use a chopper*)
3 cups water
1/2 cup kosher salt
1/4 cup brown sugar
1 bottle (12 oz.) beer

Directions:

Place peppercorns, thyme, bay, garlic, water, and salt in a saucepan,
and heat to a boil, stirring until salt dissolves and mixture becomes
mostly clear. Remove from heat and stir in brown sugar and beer and allow to cool.

Pour mixture over selected meat (chicken, pork, turkey, brats, etc) in a food safe container or plastic bag, ensuring that meat is covered (make more brine if needed).

Refrigerate meat and allow to brine for about 12 hours.

Remove meat from brine and pat dry, then cooking as desired.

Comments:

Brining produces moister meat than meat that is not brined. If you
brine your Thanksgiving turkey, you will never go back to doing it
otherwise.

I think this is perfect for meats that are going to be barbecued, like
ribs or chicken, but also for some drier meats that are being roasted (experiment with a chicken before you try a Thanksgiving dinner!)