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Nobody

Danforth Kitchen Whore
Sep 5, 2001
1,481
3
Toronto
Crespelle are the Italian equivalent of crepes. I learned this method long before I tried classic Crepes. The original reason for these in my universe was to make Manicotti, which are traditionally prepared in crespelle, not pasta.

Though the preparation now has a certain cahet, in the past crespelle were considered poor people's food. The change came in 1895, when Henri Carpentier*, Maitre'd at Montecarlo's Café de Paris, prepared them at the table for the Prince of Wales. Edward named them after his lady friend, Suzette.

To make 10-12 crespelle you will need:


INGREDIENTS:
1 cup (100 g) flour
1 cup (250 ml) milk, cold
2 egg yolks

6 tbs unsalted butter
2 tbs brandy or rum - the cheap stuff, not the sipping stuff
A healthy pinch of kosher salt (1/2 teaspoon for savory crespelle)
A crepe pan (or a 7-9" rounded side omelet/frying pan.
A brush (for thin applications of budder)

PREPARATION:
Beat 2 yolks and one whole egg with the sugar and the salt, then incorporate the flour and slowly add the milk, so as to obtain a creamy batter.

Whip the remaining white to moderately firm peaks and carefully fold in the liquor, then fold the mixture into the batter.

Melt 2 tablespoons of the butter and fold it into the batter too. Let the batter sit in a cool place for at least an hour.

When you are ready to proceed, melt the remaining budder and lightly brush your crepe pan, which should be over a medium heat.

Pour 2-3 tablespoons of batter into the center of the pan and distribute it evenly by shifting the pan.

Cook for a couple of minutes, then flip the crespella (the Joy of Cooking says to use your fingers if you can stand the heat) and cook for a couple of minutes more; don't let it over-brown.

Continue until you have finished the batter, stacking the finished crespelle [I sometimes use a torn sheet of parchment paper] on a plate and covering them with a cloth.

They freeze well, too.
 

Nobody

Danforth Kitchen Whore
Sep 5, 2001
1,481
3
Toronto
Is that just an omlet with salsa in it? Ever hear of Huevos Rancheros? I dump salsa all over my eggs. I do prefer it on top of the omlet, but to each his own.
Well, having lived in SoCal for about 18 years, chances are i've probably had about 20 different variations of Huevos Rancheros. In my memory banks there's a version of it where you get two easy-over eggs, refried beans [frijoles refrito,] guacamole, tortilla chips, salsa roja [tomato based salsa] and sometimes sour cream.

Yes, I do love that for a sturdy breakfast or lunch, but cooking it up takes a lot more work than a 5-minute omelet.

The Salsa Omelet as pictured has chunky salsa, a few dollops of cream cheese and a splatter or two of chipotle pepper sauce.
 

maxyedor

<b>TOOL PRO</b>
Oct 20, 2005
4,289
1,643
In the bathroom, fighting a battle
Well, having lived in SoCal for about 18 years, chances are i've probably had about 20 different variations of Huevos Rancheros. In my memory banks there's a version of it where you get two easy-over eggs, refried beans [frijoles refrito,] guacamole, tortilla chips, salsa roja [tomato based salsa] and sometimes sour cream.

Yes, I do love that for a sturdy breakfast or lunch, but cooking it up takes a lot more work than a 5-minute omelet.

The Salsa Omelet as pictured has chunky salsa, a few dollops of cream cheese and a splatter or two of chipotle pepper sauce.
Just wondering, I knew you lived in SB and couldn't figure out why the salsa omlet was special. I thought it was the salsa, not the time savings.
 

Nobody

Danforth Kitchen Whore
Sep 5, 2001
1,481
3
Toronto
Well, as a single dude, it's sometimes harder to ship oneself out the door AND have a tasty start to the day, so once in a while i have to cut corners, skip and run.

However, thanks for reminding me of the 'Rancher's Eggs' thing in the first place, since it's a personal fave - I need to work out a decent 'recipe' for it and make it myself and my next 'ahem' conquest.

Do you make it yourself? I'm thinking of a black-bean refried bean thing, as opposed to the basic pinto bean...

Plus, I gotta develop my own salsa recipe. Up here, it's pretty pale stuff, i have to say.
 

Nobody

Danforth Kitchen Whore
Sep 5, 2001
1,481
3
Toronto


I admit, the pic does no one any justice, but remember that i'm usually serving for guests and i just get a whisper of a chance to take ANY kind of shot...

All this will one day be rectified.

Recipes to follow...
 

maxyedor

<b>TOOL PRO</b>
Oct 20, 2005
4,289
1,643
In the bathroom, fighting a battle
Do you make it yourself? I'm thinking of a black-bean refried bean thing, as opposed to the basic pinto bean...

Plus, I gotta develop my own salsa recipe. Up here, it's pretty pale stuff, i have to say.
I do make it myself, the blackbean refried beans are pretty good, I'm a huge fan of blackbeans in general. I usually just use whatever type of beans I have lying around, three eggs, fresh corn tortillas (god knows where to get fresh made tortillas in Canada, eh) I also like slices of fresh avacado with mine. As for the salsa if you can get Herdez in a can it's your best bet for comercialy made salsa, the local carneceria makes some really great pico de gallio, again hard to find in Canada.

When I make my own salsa I like a mild to medium spice. I use about 4-5 large tomatoes, very importand to get meaty ones otherwise you get a real soupy salsa, I prefer a chuky almost dry salsa. I then add one large onion, a good amount of cilantro, and 1-2 good size Aneheim chilis, they are mild enough that you get some great flavor without hurting your freinds mouths, I leave a few seeds in for spice, otherwise I throw-out the seeds. Then just dice everything up finly and throw it in a bowl. Then add more of this or that or the other untill it tastes just right. If you like a spicier salsa, just use a stronger chili.

The other beans I would recomend you try are standard refried pintos, with whole black-beans mixed in. Also if you can get fresh avacados up there homemade guaccamole is a personal favorite.
 

Nobody

Danforth Kitchen Whore
Sep 5, 2001
1,481
3
Toronto
Are you now in Toronto? I'm up in BC now. Good to see you sharing all your food knowledge...D
Yeah, I'm a card-carrying Repatriate these days.

Are you in Van? I just recently spent a week there with family and friends...
 

Nobody

Danforth Kitchen Whore
Sep 5, 2001
1,481
3
Toronto
Margarita Salsa:

1 cup diced tomato (I used Romas - about 4)
1 cup medium diced white onion
5 green chilies, very finely minced (generic, anyway)
1 cup gently packed cilantro, roughly chopped
4 large cloves garlic, minced (in a mini-food-processor)
1 teaspoon kosher salt
½ cup lime juice
½ cup tequila (Corallejos)
 

Nobody

Danforth Kitchen Whore
Sep 5, 2001
1,481
3
Toronto
This is the Basic Version, you can go anywhere from this one with endless variations -- herbs, fruit juices or purées, soy, chili powders [very popular is ancho these days]...

Make sure you use real shallots in this recipe, not green onions or scallions (which in New Orleans are often mistakenly called shallots). You can substitute onions if necessary, but they have a sharper flavor; use sweet onions if you have to substitute.*



This recipe doubles or triples well, also.

Ingredients:

2 tablespoons shallots, finely minced
1/4 cup white wine or dry vermouth
1/4 cup freshly squeezed lemon juice or white wine vinegar
4 ounces unsalted butter, cut into pieces
Salt to taste
Pepper to taste

How to:

In a non-aluminum saucepan, combine shallots with the wine. Reduce a glace (until syrupy). Add the lemon juice or vinegar and reduce a glace. Remove from heat and add one chunk of butter, stirring with a whisk to blend.

Slowly add all the pieces of butter until well combined. This technique is called monter au beurre, to finish, or "mount" a sauce with butter. If you need to return the sauce to the heat to incorporate all the butter, do it over very low heat, or the sauce will break. **

Some variations - usually older, classical ones - suggest that you strain the sauce through a fine mesh strainer. Lately, however, I've left the sauce as is and allowed the shallots to transit to the dish. No one complained and it gave the sauce a little more 'viscosity'.

Serve immediately, or hold in a double boiler over barely simmering water, or just some warm place in the kitchen.

YIELD: about 3/4 cup

___________________________
* The thing about shallots is that they're sweeter and not as pungent as onion, but also, they don't change their qualities as much under heat. Onions have a much higher sugar content [as contradictory as this sounds!] and can go from tangy/hot to sweet and sugary in a few minutes in a pot.

** I'll post a few methods of 'repairing a broken budder sauce' soon...
 

BikeMike

Monkey
Feb 24, 2006
784
0
Teaser: Pizza - BBQ Chicken, Version 1

This was a good one. Made it for a bunch of friends and they loved it. One must be careful with the peppers though. I almost over did it by a fair amount, but it ended up perfectly spicy (I didn't use the full amount, as the peppers I got had quite a bit of bite). Thanks!
 

Nobody

Danforth Kitchen Whore
Sep 5, 2001
1,481
3
Toronto
Creamy Dreamy Hot Chocolate



Ingredients:

1 8oz. can sweetened condensed milk
1/2 cup unsweetened cocoa powder
1 1/2 teaspoons of extract of your choice (vanilla is most common)
1/8 teaspoon salt
6 cups hot water

How to:

1. In a large sauce pan combine milk, cocoa, salt and extract with a whisk. Slowly pour in hot water and continue to whisk until combined. Heat with medium heat until warmed through but do not boil.

2. Serve with a liquor or mini marshmallows.

I have another one that's totally a pain in the ass but worth it...
 

Nobody

Danforth Kitchen Whore
Sep 5, 2001
1,481
3
Toronto


Store-bought crust - thin.

Sauce - Basic chunky tomato Marinara with some Raspberry-Chipotle BBQ sauce mixed in.

Cheese - Shredded generic Mozzarella, some shredded Wilton Cheddar and a few crumbled lumps of Chevre Goat cheese.

Toppings - thinly sliced white mushrooms, some crushed garlic and Calabrian salami.

Basic Assembly:

1) A little EVOO brushed over the crust to begin with.
2) Add some healthy glops of the Sauce and spread out as evenly as possible. Splatter around the garlic.
3) Distribute the two shredded cheeses (about 3/4 of the total) evenly around the crust.
4) Layer the mushrooms and some of the cheese remnants.
5) Add the salami.
6) Dust over with any remnants of the ingredients.

In the oven at 400-425 for about 20 minutes.

I tend to pack up the toppings in a wide ring around the middle, with only a little of the toppings in the center - I find you lose less when you cut the pie into typical triangles.
 

Nobody

Danforth Kitchen Whore
Sep 5, 2001
1,481
3
Toronto
stosh said:
Ok I'm having some guests over this Sunday and I was hoping to do some Chilli in the crockpot over the weekend for when they come. I was wondering if you have any recipes you like.

I was also looking for a true/easy salsa fresca recipe. I saw your margarita salsa recipe and I'm debating trying it but I was wondering if you had one you prefered more.

Any suggestions on either?

I love your post in the beer and food forum and I'm looking forward to making a bunch of your recipes.
I'll address the Salsa first - I assume you're going to serve it with chips and sour cream?

Here's a classic [i.e. shouldn't frighten off the noobs] salsa that i've used numerous times:

4 ripe tomatoes, chopped
1/4 red onion, chopped
1 jalapeno, minced [chopped really fine]
8 cilantro sprigs, chopped [sometimes called 'fresh coriander]
3 garlic cloves, minced [chopped really fine]
Juice of 1 lime
1/4 cup olive oil
1/2 teaspoon Kosher salt.

In a mixing bowl, combine all ingredients together. Toss thoroughly. Let stand 15 minutes before serving.

What kind of Chili are you aiming for? Basic Texas Firehouse [aka American]? or more along the exotic?

I'll also post this message in its entirity on the appropriate thread...
 

stosh

Darth Bailer
Jul 20, 2001
22,238
392
NY
What kind of Chili are you aiming for? Basic Texas Firehouse [aka American]? or more along the exotic?

I'll also post this message in its entirity on the appropriate thread...
Yeah I was thinking of some American Chili.

Something basic but good. I want our guests to say it was the best chili they ever had.

That salsa recipe is the exact thing I'm looking for.
 

Nobody

Danforth Kitchen Whore
Sep 5, 2001
1,481
3
Toronto
Ingredients:

6 ounces hot turkey Italian sausage
2 cups chopped onion
1 cup chopped red bell pepper
1 garlic head, minced
1 pound fine-chopped sirloin *1
2 jalapeño pepper, chopped [or 1 seranno]*2
3 tablespoons American chili powder *3
2 tablespoons brown sugar
1 tablespoon ground cumin
3 tablespoons tomato paste [not sauce]
1 teaspoon dried oregano
½ teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
½ teaspoon Kosher salt
3 bay leaves
1 1/4 cups Merlot or other fruity red wine
2 (28-ounce) cans whole tomatoes, undrained and coarsely chopped
2 (15-ounce) cans kidney beans, drained
¾ cup (4 ounces) shredded sharp cheddar cheese [the sharper the better!]
½-¾ cup sour cream

How to:

Heat a large Dutch oven over medium-high heat.*4

Remove casings from sausage and break up the meat.

Add sausage, onion, bell pepper, garlic and sirloin to pan; cook 8-10 minutes or until sausage and beef are browned, stirring to crumble. Keep poking at it with a wooden spoon to keep the meat separated. Don't over do it - later it will separate naturally.

Add chili powder, brown sugar, cumin, tomato paste, oregano, black pepper, Kosher salt and bay leaves, and cook for 1-3 minutes, stirring constantly.

Stir in wine, tomatoes, and kidney beans; bring to a boil.

Cover, reduce heat, and simmer 1 hour, stirring occasionally.

Uncover and cook for 30 minutes, stirring occasionally. Add about ½ the cheese so it melts and melds into the core sauce.

Discard the bay leaves. Serve in bowls.

Sprinkle each serving with the remaining cheddar cheese and a dollop of sour cream.


____________________________________
n.b.: Like most stews, gumbos and soups, 8-12 hours will help to improve over-all consistency and flavor. 24 hours isn't necessary. You can make it first thing in the morning or the night before, just prior to crashing.

*1 - Sirloin is suggested as you aren't actually cooking this for more than about 1.5 hrs. In a stew, with 2-4 hrs of heat, you could use stewing beef. But it would take a lot more slowly-applied heat to properly break down the connective tissues so that it's chewy but not tough.

I usually get a couple of sirloin steaks and cut it fine by hand. It give the chili a rustic, natural look. If you don't have time for this, get your local butcher to grind it coarsely for you. Failing that, get the best looking ground beef you have available.

*2 - If you can't get Jalapeno or Serrano peppers, consider using a commonly available chipotle hot-pepper sauce. Failing even that, use some Tobasco for heat. If you're using sauce to add heat, do it near the end, before serving, and adjust for your own personal taste...

*3 - American chili powder is usually made from milder, dried and smoked chillies. It's flavor, not it's heat, is what we like it for. If your chili powder is more than a year old, toss it out and get some fresh stuff. You'll notice the difference, I swear it.

*4 - Dutch Oven - basically, a large, cast-iron and ceramic enameled pot with a lid. Use whatever you have that you can move easily - this can get heavy! I used to use an 8-quart Stock Pot from Calphalon - it was heavy gauge aluminum. It's not critical.
 

stosh

Darth Bailer
Jul 20, 2001
22,238
392
NY
Ingredients:

6 ounces hot turkey Italian sausage

How many will this feed?
Why did you choose Turkey Sausage?
I think is this the perfect recipe for what i'm looking to do.

Dude you rock! I will try to do my best to take photos.
I'm going to make the salsa and chili, I'm debating on making the mini baked potatos as well.
 

Nobody

Danforth Kitchen Whore
Sep 5, 2001
1,481
3
Toronto
1) How many will this feed?
2) Why did you choose Turkey Sausage?
I think is this the perfect recipe for what i'm looking to do.

Dude you rock! I will try to do my best to take photos.
I'm going to make the salsa and chili,

3) I'm debating on making the mini baked potatos as well.
1 - Yield: 8 servings (serving size: 1¼ cups chili and 1 tbs cheese and 1 tbs sour cream)

2 - Turkey Sausage yields a good compromise in texture, seasoning and keeps the fat content of the meal low enough to add the cheese and sour cream without too much guilt.

3- Might be too many carbs. I'd save it for a regular Tritip barbecue as a main side dish.
 

stosh

Darth Bailer
Jul 20, 2001
22,238
392
NY
1 - Yield: 8 servings (serving size: 1¼ cups chili and 1 tbs cheese and 1 tbs sour cream)

2 - Turkey Sausage yields a good compromise in texture, seasoning and keeps the fat content of the meal low enough to add the cheese and sour cream without too much guilt.

3- Might be too many carbs. I'd save it for a regular Tritip barbecue as a main side dish.
Ok, I'm looking for a good excuse to make them. Maybe I'll do them tonight just for fun. :)

Thanks again!! You rock!
 

Nobody

Danforth Kitchen Whore
Sep 5, 2001
1,481
3
Toronto
Brined and Grilled Chicken Breasts:

Okay, what is easier than grilling a skinless, boneless chicken breast? Mickey D's, that's what. Let's not go there. Literally.

Grilling a tender, juicy and flavorful chicken breast is almost always f'd up. Sans the chicken skin and because of uneven thickness, most folks end up with a dry piece of flavorless meat by the time it’s done [enter my ex-wife.]

Pounding the chicken breast to an even thickness, brining and grilling it over a high, direct heat will solve this problem, honest!

When you buy skinless, boneless chicken breasts they have a tapered shape and attached tenderloin. For grilling purposes it is best to remove the tenderloin since it’s thin shape will cook much too fast to be any good before the rest of the chicken is cooked. These are often sold separately as 'chicken tenders' - they easily separate by hand from the main tit.

To even out the meat, pound it to about 1/2 inch thickness [or, depending on size, whatever looks EVEN THICKNESS.]

This will give the breast a uniform thickness and break up the meat, which will allow the brine to permeate the meat quickly.

To brine the chicken:
Dissolve 1-1/2 tablespoons of genric table salt (or 1/4 cup of kosher salt) with 1/4 cup of sugar in 8 cups of cold water.

This will make enough brine for 4 chicken breasts. If you are making more or less, adjust the amount of brine accordingly [divide by two, multiply by four, whatever.]

The sugar in the brine will caramelize on the surface of the chicken as it cooks, giving it a good, grilled coloring.

To help dissolve the sugar and water you can add it to 1 cup of boiling water, stir until dissolved and add to the remaining water.

Make sure the brine is cool before you add the chicken.

You can brine in a shallow, covered baking dish or a large zip lock bag.

Brine for 30 minutes. It is important that you give the brine enough time to soak in, but that don’t over do it - it's not an over-night sort of marinade you use on beef or pork.

Have your grill completely heated when the brining is done. You will want to take the chicken directly from the brine to the grill.

With the grill hot, put the chicken over the hottest part of the fire. The total cooking time should be about 4 minutes.

Turn the chicken only once and leave the lid off the grill.

You want to cook by direct heat, and only direct heat. Timing is very important because of the short cooking time.

Be careful not to over cook, and you will end up with some amazing chicken tits for any recipe.
 

Nobody

Danforth Kitchen Whore
Sep 5, 2001
1,481
3
Toronto
Nobody - can you give us some tasty recipes featuring beer in the mix.....and I don't mean beer battered fish or beer in chili. What other cool recipes can we make featuring beer as an ingredient?
'way too late, but i'm working on a Chili recipe that utilizes beer.

I'll prolly post it in the American Chili Thread when I do.

Toodles!
 

jdcamb

Tool Time!
Feb 17, 2002
17,975
5,804
Nowhere Man!
Brined and Grilled Chicken Breasts:


Pounding the chicken breast to an even thickness, brining and grilling it over a high, direct heat will solve this problem, honest!

To even out the meat, pound it to about 1/2 inch thickness [or, depending on size, whatever looks EVEN THICKNESS.]

To brine the chicken:
Dissolve 1-1/2 tablespoons of genric table salt (or 1/4 cup of kosher salt) with 1/4 cup of sugar in 8 cups of cold water.
I use 1/3 cup honey instead of sugar for chicken and maple syrup for pork.
 

Nobody

Danforth Kitchen Whore
Sep 5, 2001
1,481
3
Toronto
I use 1/3 cup honey instead of sugar for chicken and maple syrup for pork.
I never spank a Monkey for being creative, btw. But when preaching from the food pulpit, I default to the most basic, most of the time, so people know where to move to 'improve' and why.

I like the maple syrup for pork, by the way. Sounds great. Loins or chops or what?

Thanks for chiming in.
 

jdcamb

Tool Time!
Feb 17, 2002
17,975
5,804
Nowhere Man!
I like the maple syrup for pork, by the way. Sounds great. Loins or chops or what?
Country style ribs. Basically the wrong end of the loin. I like 'em @ $1.99lb. I slit them along the bone til flatout, brine 'em, then cook'em on a dying wood/lump charcoal fire. Good cheap eats except for the work.
 

Nobody

Danforth Kitchen Whore
Sep 5, 2001
1,481
3
Toronto
Did you make this stuff or are you taking pictures in restaurants again?
Anything on a blue background was me. White background, nope, restaurant.

I was pretty impressed with the shaved Mediterranean sausages...

I was helping out a 'real' chef and did some of the plating from scratch - others he corrected me on.

Man! was that flatiron steak the dope!

just wanted to update this post a bit...
 

Nobody

Danforth Kitchen Whore
Sep 5, 2001
1,481
3
Toronto
Ever notice some of those 'taters you're cutting up that have been around the kitchen for a week or so have a greenish tinge under the skin?

Solanine.

Here's how it applies to Potatoes:


"Solanine occurs naturally in all nightshades, including tomatoes, capsicum [chile peppers, paprika, etc,] tobacco and eggplant, as well as plants from other species. However the most ingested solanine is from the consumption of potatoes.

"Potatoes naturally produce solanine and chaconine, a related glycoalkaloid, as a defense mechanism against insects, disease, and predators. Potato leaves and stems are naturally high in glycoalkaloids.

When potato tubers are exposed to light, they turn green and increase glycoalkaloid production. This is a natural defense to help prevent the uncovered tuber from being eaten. The green colour is from chlorophyll, and is itself harmless. However, it is an indication that increased level of solanine and chaconine may be present.

"Commercial varieties of potatoes are screened for solanine levels, and most have a solanine content of less than 0.2mg/g. However potatoes that have been exposed to light and started to green can show concentrations of 1mg/g or more. In these situations a single unpeeled potato can result in a dangerous dose.

Cleaning Up:

"Solanine and chaconine are present in potato shoots. In potato tubers 30–80% of the solanine develops in and under the skin and thus may be removed by peeling and removing the eyes.

"This is advisable if the tubers show green, but is not a guarantee of safety. Potatoes that show green under the skin should never be eaten. Potato greening strongly suggests solanine build-up although each process can occur without the other. A bitter taste in a potato may be a more reliable indicator of toxicity.

"Deep-frying potatoes at 170° C (306° F) will effectively lower glycoalkaloid levels, but microwaving is only somewhat effective and boiling is not.

What Solanine Poisoning can Do For You:

"Solanine poisoning is primarily displayed by gastrointestinal and neurological disorders. Symptoms include nausea, diarrhea, vomiting, stomach cramps, burning of the throat, heart arrhythmia, headache and dizziness. Hallucinations, loss of sensation, and paralysis, fever, jaundice, dilated pupils and hypothermia have been reported in more severe cases.

"In large quantities, solanine poisoning can cause death. One study suggests that doses of 2 to 5 mg per kilogram of body weight can cause toxic symptoms, and doses of 3 to 6 mg per kilogram of body weight can be fatal.

"Symptoms usually occur 8 to 12 hours after ingestion, but may occur as rapidly as 30 minutes after eating high-solanine foods.

Why I'm passing along this information:

Folks, I have upwards of 80 cookbooks, including the Larousse Gastronomique and the Escoffier, and a variety of other 'bibles' on cooking.

None make special reference to Solanine in Potatoes.

Several of my friends have used green potatoes. Yes, they were 'faintly' green and the green-ness disappeared after peeling.

Thing is, most people thought that the 'green potato' was 'unripe' - thus, leaving it to 'ripen' would get past this problem, or neutralize it. It's the reverse, so a perfectly good potato would turn green over time, not 'ripen'...

So, just toss them, 'k? Too many eyes? Chuck 'em. Don't keep peeling to remove the green - the green just lets you know that the solanine is LIKELY to be forming in it, and you can't guarantee where and how much.

Just sayin', s'all...