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Post your 2012 Rides!

aaronjb

Monkey
Jul 22, 2010
662
136
http://northshoreracks.com/

actually pretty rad racks. Some of the best out there. They don't stick out so far, so parking is less of a b1tch, and if you have any dirt roads/kinks/dips in the road, you don't have to worry about 5 feet sticking out of the back of your car smashing into the ground. There is also less leverage on your suspension. If I ever break my thule I'll get one of those.
Yeah, I was goofing, but then I looked them up. They do look useful - particularly for a pickup.
 

Brete

Chimp
Dec 14, 2011
24
0
Salt Lake City
So how do you like the ride? Did you get a Works headset?
I have yet to pull the trigger myself but am thinking about doing it today. I'd be careful with that seatpost being so low. You could damage your fender/shock protector.
So far i love it. The 888 and Vivid are a plush setup.

My LBS measured the HT angle at 65.5* (although the specs say 66.5*). I bought a -2* Works headset, which is still in the box. This time of year, I'll have to pedal/push the rig up the hill, so I'm running single-ply tires and holding off installing the Works headset. Once the lifts open up, I'll convert her to a dedicated DH bike.

Yeah, I slammed the seat just for the photo. I was near the end of a 2,000' vertical climb and had the seat jacked, which looks ridiculous on this rig. So, how close to the fender can the seatpost be without running the risk of damaging the fender? SC suggests cutting the fender to maximize seatpost adjust-ability, but not sure I want to go that route.

Have you bought one yet?
 
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BigBoi

Monkey
Oct 31, 2011
296
21
Center of the world
So far i love it. The 888 and Vivid are a plush setup.

My LBS measured the HT angle at 65.5* (although the specs say 66.5*). I bought a -2* Works headset, which is still in the box. This time of year, I'll have to pedal/push the rig up the hill, so I'm running single-ply tires and holding off installing the Works headset. Once the lifts open up, I'll convert her to a dedicated DH bike.

Yeah, I slammed the seat just for the photo. I was near the end of a 2,000' vertical climb and had the seat jacked, which looks ridiculous on this rig. So, how close to the fender can the seatpost be without running the risk of damaging the fender? SC suggests cutting the fender to maximize seatpost adjust-ability, but not sure I want to go that route.

Have you bought one yet?
Yours looks great. Not sure how much room you need to leave between the fender and the seatpost, but I would guess at least an inch or two. They move in a similar but not identical direction when the suspension is compressed.
I wouldn't cut the fender simply because it keeps crap from getting in the shock but I guess it's an option.

I finally ordered my works -1.5* headset yesterday as well as a 6mm headset spacer from them. Will get back to you once I receive mine and get it on the bike.
 

Brete

Chimp
Dec 14, 2011
24
0
Salt Lake City
I wouldn't cut the fender simply because it keeps crap from getting in the shock but I guess it's an option.

I finally ordered my works -1.5* headset yesterday as well as a 6mm headset spacer from them. Will get back to you once I receive mine and get it on the bike.
A drop seat would solve the issue.

Personally, I'd have your HT angle measured first. The stock specs are rarely accurate. I thought I was at 66.5 and so I ordered the -2 headset. Turns out, as mentioned, I'm at 65.5 and now might be a tad slack at 63.5 with the angled headset.
 

Banshee Rider

Turbo Monkey
Jul 31, 2003
1,456
10
Freshly rebuilt with new Saint derailleur, shifter, crank, and hubs (on flows). XT brakes with Icetech rotors, and XT Trail pedals, and a Pro Atherton bar + stem with ESI silicon grips. 36.6lbs, for the nerds that care.

 

Banshee Rider

Turbo Monkey
Jul 31, 2003
1,456
10
w/ single ply tires? Either way, pretty nimble.
No, those are DH 2ply 2.4 Ardents. That weight is with tubes, also. I'm not really concerned with saving weight, but having a 36lb bike should make riding light in the woods alittle funner.
 

Brete

Chimp
Dec 14, 2011
24
0
Salt Lake City
No, those are DH 2ply 2.4 Ardents. That weight is with tubes, also. I'm not really concerned with saving weight, but having a 36lb bike should make riding light in the woods alittle funner.
Ardents are an interesting choice for that rig. What is it that you like about them? For which type of terrain do you find them best suited?
 

angrychico

Chimp
Aug 30, 2003
25
0
Wanaka, NZ
Sold the DW dhr and picked up this beast. Loving the way it rides so far. Changes: enve bar, straitline pedals, der kaisers, and a -1 angle set. Better pics to come.

UiPsH.jpg
 

Banshee Rider

Turbo Monkey
Jul 31, 2003
1,456
10
Ardents are an interesting choice for that rig. What is it that you like about them? For which type of terrain do you find them best suited?
They're just what I grabbed from the pile. I used them a bunch last season, on the predominately loamy rich dirt of New England, with varying degrees of moisture. They roll quick, and the compound is predictable Maxxis. Aside from requiring alittle more slide and lean than the standard issue DHF, they're a fine substitute in my opinion.
 

jackalope

Mental acuity - 1%
Jan 9, 2004
5,850
2,040
in a single wide, cooking meth...
In short, yes, I have experienced a pretty minor amount of increased flex and slight play in bottom link. In some cases, the bushing shoulders have worn off the ano of the link & frame, and actually eaten into the aluminum. Mine has the paint worn off, but that's about it at this point. However, the axles can also wear prematurely and that is where I think a lot of the flex/play issue comes from. Again, in my case, it was never noticeable while riding and only detectable when one conducts the ever-important rear wheel/seatpost flex test. Others have claimed it was more significant, leading some to postulate they has mis-aligned frames. On the plus side tho, Banshee has tried to address these problems by sending owners new axles with a special coating and nylon washers to insert between the bushing shoulder and the frame. I put in the new axles this past weekend and what little flex/play I had is completely gone now - feels as stiff as it did brand new. I don't have enough wear around the bushings to even consider putting one of the washers in there, so hopefully that will remain the case. The bushings themselves have had a *very* long service life, and are definitely easier to replace than small, sh!tty bearings that disentegrate with a few weeks and leave a sweet tiny race to have to dig out. Of course, that statement is (significantly) tempered with the issues I described, and I think pretty much everyone agrees the design is far from perfect. Certainly the bushing setup on a Turner 5 Spot is superior. However, Banshee also claims to be working a MkII Spitty and perhaps offer it a substantial discount to the current owners who have had problems, but who knows if that will really happen. But in the end, I haven't missed any ride time and it simply rides better than anything I've tried. I was looking for something that was low, slack, durable (in the sense that the frame won't detonate in a year), relatively inexpensive, reasonable frame weight, adjustable seat post cable guides, tapered HT, 23.5" TT, and 5" of travel as I think most 6" bikes ride more like DH bikes than trail bikes. The Spitfire checked all my boxes, and I plan on riding the thing until it explodes - then I will get a MkII.
 

schaus889

Chimp
Jul 21, 2008
26
0
NY
Brand new, first new bike I've owned, picked it up on tuesday. Hoping for a short winter here northeast! Completely stock right now, it'll get new pedals and spring soon glory.jpg
 

CraigRea

Chimp
Aug 25, 2011
9
0
I pedaled one around recently and thought it was on the steep side, although I have a Tr450, which is 63.5* or so. Seemed to have a tallish standover too, but again, I may be just so accustomed to my bike.
It must be the picture because its sitting at around 64deg there.