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Random new bike thread

Jm_

sled dog's bollocks
Jan 14, 2002
19,400
10,025
AK
Interesting cable routing for the rear triangle. Can't recall seeing a set up like that.
My canfield basically has that exact arrangement. The frame looks way different, but the cables basically take the same route.
 

Happymtb.fr

Turbo Monkey
Feb 9, 2016
1,978
1,339
SWE
The benefit of SAR springs is they guarantee ~1.5% accuracy and they now include the tested spring rate of the spring they ship you.
SAR has become really expensive for euros since brexit but yes they were good before the certificate and are even better now

Interesting cable routing for the rear triangle. Can't recall seeing a set up like that.
Santa cruz is kind of similar
 

FlipFantasia

Turbo Monkey
Oct 4, 2001
1,675
502
Sea to Sky BC
nice clean lines...a couple months ago I bought a buddies barely ridden Santa Cruz Blur with a Pike 120mm on it and it's a f'ing weapon, absolutely loving it.
 

Sandwich

Pig my fish!
Staff member
May 23, 2002
21,336
6,382
borcester rhymes
Thanks. Not a fan of the pivot point, but nobody asked me. I enjoy shorter travel and wonder if we'll see a swing back away from 165mm enduro bikes for everything. Seems like the Optics and etc. are just as capable when ridden well.
 

FlipSide

Turbo Monkey
Sep 24, 2001
1,405
855
Thanks. Not a fan of the pivot point, but nobody asked me. I enjoy shorter travel and wonder if we'll see a swing back away from 165mm enduro bikes for everything. Seems like the Optics and etc. are just as capable when ridden well.
I now have a few rides on my 2023 Optic. I also love short travel bikes (and hardtails, for that matter) and I can confirm the Optic is indeed very capable. However, it is not nearly as capable as a big 165mm enduro bike for rough and/or fast trails with big features. There is no way around it.

You could argue that these short travel bikes are more fun overall than big enduro bikes (I personally hate being overbiked on mellow trails), but they really shine on jump trails and general trail riding. There is absolutely no problem hitting all the spicy bits you will find along the way...but for the serious stuff, big travel bikes are still the way to go, IMO.
 

Jm_

sled dog's bollocks
Jan 14, 2002
19,400
10,025
AK
I rode my XC race bike last night with the "trail" wheels and fork. It's a precision weapon and it's a blast how fast you can ride it everywhere...especially on flatter terrain without as much gravity helping you. It's definitely not as fun when things get rougher, but it's also fun passing people like they are standing still and generally hauling a$$ and popping off every little thing. That kind of thing probably constitutes 10% or less of my total riding...but still, it's fun.
 

Sandwich

Pig my fish!
Staff member
May 23, 2002
21,336
6,382
borcester rhymes
I now have a few rides on my 2023 Optic. I also love short travel bikes (and hardtails, for that matter) and I can confirm the Optic is indeed very capable. However, it is not nearly as capable as a big 165mm enduro bike for rough and/or fast trails with big features. There is no way around it.

You could argue that these short travel bikes are more fun overall than big enduro bikes (I personally hate being overbiked on mellow trails), but they really shine on jump trails and general trail riding. There is absolutely no problem hitting all the spicy bits you will find along the way...but for the serious stuff, big travel bikes are still the way to go, IMO.
Oh definitely. Sorry not trying to argue that everybody needs 110mm of travel and that's it, but rather a lot of trail riders are riding bikes that are way more capable than they realistically need for trail center trails. It just seems like if you don't have 140mm of travel then you are dead, even at the kingdom trails
 

canadmos

Cake Tease
May 29, 2011
21,224
20,449
Canaderp
I just 'run what I brung', which happens to be my enduro bike. Trails are fun regardless of what you're on.

Plus I don't have room for a 2nd trail bike.....yet*.

I say that with a sweet steel RSD frame waiting patiently under my bed.
 

trib

not worthy of a Rux.
Jun 22, 2009
1,523
479
Can it take a proper fork (DC)?
I believe on that frame the gussets are partially just to keep the ancilloti visual language.

There aren’t many bikes I can recognise immediately from the head tube junction
 

FlipSide

Turbo Monkey
Sep 24, 2001
1,405
855
If my current fleet of bikes my Rootdown's 3 year old press in BB has been flawless while my two threaded BB have required multiple replacements in the same time period and are currently clunking/squeaking.
Yeah, I don't have issues with PF BB. I've had 3 bikes with PF BB and they've all been perfect in my case too.

I am mostly happy the industry seems to be dropping one BB standard. Based on my experience, I would have been equally happy to see the industry drop the threaded BB...but I know more people hate PF than threaded, so here we are.
 

canadmos

Cake Tease
May 29, 2011
21,224
20,449
Canaderp
OneUp makes hubs now?


Its too bad they went with enduro bearings.

I wonder why they'd make them so that their ratchets can fit in DT Swiss hubs, but not the other way around?
 

Westy

the teste
Nov 22, 2002
55,016
20,901
Sleazattle
OneUp makes hubs now?


Its too bad they went with enduro bearings.

I wonder why they'd make them so that their ratchets can fit in DT Swiss hubs, but not the other way around?
I am guessing they are threading the needle with patent shenanigans
 

Andeh

Customer Title
Mar 3, 2020
1,098
1,058
Someone on Vital said it has to do with trying to move bearings outboard.

They look pretty decent, but I'd still rather have 350s with a 54t. A big draw of the 350s to me is the bearings last forever, whereas the Enduro bearings in my Hydras were only good for like a season. But maybe the extra seals will be enough to offset that. I mean, my Santa Cruz bikes use Enduro bearings with really good external seals, and they last way longer than they have in other bikes.
 

slimshady

¡Mira, una ardilla!
Someone on Vital said it has to do with trying to move bearings outboard.

They look pretty decent, but I'd still rather have 350s with a 54t. A big draw of the 350s to me is the bearings last forever, whereas the Enduro bearings in my Hydras were only good for like a season. But maybe the extra seals will be enough to offset that. I mean, my Santa Cruz bikes use Enduro bearings with really good external seals, and they last way longer than they have in other bikes.
It's not about extra seals, it's about the tiny ball diameter and poor hardening process the Enduro branded ones have. DT hubs (and many oter brands) get away with a much smaller ball count per bearing because the surface treatment/hardening process is a whole lot better than these suppossedly superior products.
 
It's not about extra seals, it's about the tiny ball diameter and poor hardening process the Enduro branded ones have. DT hubs (and many oter brands) get away with a much smaller ball count per bearing because the surface treatment/hardening process is a whole lot better than these suppossedly superior products.
Another thing is that since CAD/CAM has become ubiquitous, design margins have tended to approach zero. Stuff works in theory and fails in practice.
 

Westy

the teste
Nov 22, 2002
55,016
20,901
Sleazattle
Another thing is that since CAD/CAM has become ubiquitous, design margins have tended to approach zero. Stuff works in theory and fails in practice.

This makes no sense if you are familiar with how things are manufactured.

Ball bearings are just a terrible application for suspension pivots. Best I can tell only the bike industry uses them. And don't go blaming the bike industry. When you have a very light vehicle a little friction makes a big different and and consumers demand luxurious suppleness when riding their buffed flow trails.
 
This makes no sense if you are familiar with how things are manufactured.

Ball bearings are just a terrible application for suspension pivots. Best I can tell only the bike industry uses them. And don't go blaming the bike industry. When you have a very light vehicle a little friction makes a big different and and consumers demand luxurious suppleness when riding their buffed flow trails.
I'll defer to you - I got out of manufacturing before the turn of the century.

The other thing with ball bearings and pivot points is that high impact and little travel ain't exactly what they were invented for.
 

slimshady

¡Mira, una ardilla!
I'll defer to you - I got out of manufacturing before the turn of the century.

The other thing with ball bearings and pivot points is that high impact and little travel ain't exactly what they were invented for.
I was initially concerned about the rear pivots of my Siskiu using Igus bushings, but I have to admit they have lasted longer (and play free) than the bearings it has on the other pivots. All of it with just a little cleaning/greasing every now and then.
 

Westy

the teste
Nov 22, 2002
55,016
20,901
Sleazattle
I'll defer to you - I got out of manufacturing before the turn of the century.

The other thing with ball bearings and pivot points is that high impact and little travel ain't exactly what they were invented for.
Yup, there in lies the problem.

And before CAD/CAM, designing/manufacturing/implementing things like ball bearings was more of a crapshoot. You had products that were over built and would last forever, and shit that would fail regularly. It is easy to have survivor bias in these situations.

I can argue that my 120 year old house, built with no codes, is structurally superior to modern construction. But for every one of my kind of house, ten were torn down for rotting and falling apart.
 

jonKranked

Detective Dookie
Nov 10, 2005
86,703
25,249
media blackout
Yup, there in lies the problem.

And before CAD/CAM, designing/manufacturing/implementing things like ball bearings was more of a crapshoot. You had products that were over built and would last forever, and shit that would fail regularly. It is easy to have survivor bias in these situations.

I can argue that my 120 year old house, built with no codes, is structurally superior to modern construction. But for every one of my kind of house, ten were torn down for rotting and falling apart.
kind of like submarines huh
 

Carraig042

me 1st
Apr 5, 2011
742
359
East Tennessee
.. whereas the Enduro bearings in my Hydras were only good for like a season.
I am sure the axle flex does not help the situation.

I was initially concerned about the rear pivots of my Siskiu using Igus bushings, but I have to admit they have lasted longer (and play free) than the bearings it has on the other pivots. All of it with just a little cleaning/greasing every now and then.
I agree, my Ripmo has been the same. Pivots stay remarkably clean.
 

Westy

the teste
Nov 22, 2002
55,016
20,901
Sleazattle
I am sure the axle flex does not help the situation.



I agree, my Ripmo has been the same. Pivots stay remarkably clean.
I put a decade of 100+ hard miles per week on a Turner with full bushings with no more maintenance than hitting the zerks with grease every once in a while.
 

jackalope

Mental acuity - 1%
Jan 9, 2004
7,655
6,033
in a single wide, cooking meth...
I put a decade of 100+ hard miles per week on a Turner with full bushings with no more maintenance than hitting the zerks with grease every once in a while.
My understanding is that bushings are great when the bore tolerances are super tight, but less so when they're, ya know, like many things in bike manufacturing - not so good. I had a bike with a bushing in the main pivot and it melted those things almost weekly. But I'd like to think that's a very solvable problem today.
 

Westy

the teste
Nov 22, 2002
55,016
20,901
Sleazattle
My understanding is that bushings are great when the bore tolerances are super tight, but less so when they're, ya know, like many things in bike manufacturing - not so good. I had a bike with a bushing in the main pivot and it melted those things almost weekly. But I'd like to think that's a very solvable problem today.
The bushing tolerances shouldn't be that difficult to hold if machined properly with a reamer for boring bar. The had part would be alignment and concentricity. That being said a lot of machining I see on bikes someone uses the same .25" end mill for everything and they interpolate whatever bores they need. Had a Renthal stem that was built like that on a machine with a lot of backlash and the resulting bore was offset, causing a stress riser that cracked. Thankfully I noticed it before riding.

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