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HAB

Chelsea from Seattle
Apr 28, 2007
11,235
1,622
Seattle
The reason that the older Dorado crept down was that the positive and negative springs didn't auto-equalize at topout. Instead, they do it when you put a shock pump on the valve. You'd get air slowly, incrementally working its way past the main piston into the negative chamber, and that pressure would increase over time.

Fixing it was as easy as attaching a shock pump once in a while.
 

trib

not worthy of a Rux.
Jun 22, 2009
1,202
134
It’s oddly steep and short looking considering it’s neither of those things.
 

bullcrew

3 Dude Approved
Most interesting thing to me is that the pro version can be upgraded to coil and they're offering 6 spring rates.
Finally not being limited it's as if someone is listening to reality or looking from outside the box in...
I still haven't rode one of these forks....I do want to run one..weight is t much of a concern it's withing reasonable and I'm heavy so a little extra I'm pretty sure is a good thing...

I think it looks good.....

Dual rate springs with divider aka slider...would be a good addition...always seems to work better than when they attempt a dual rate single coil...plus you can dial it in like our off road race trucks and crawlers...I want to see shocks with a tender spring as well...
 

jonKranked

Detective Dookie
Nov 10, 2005
70,707
13,275
media blackout
Finally not being limited it's as if someone is listening to reality or looking from outside the box in...
I still haven't rode one of these forks....I do want to run one..weight is t much of a concern it's withing reasonable and I'm heavy so a little extra I'm pretty sure is a good thing...

I think it looks good.....

Dual rate springs with divider aka slider...would be a good addition...always seems to work better than when they attempt a dual rate single coil...plus you can dial it in like our off road race trucks and crawlers...I want to see shocks with a tender spring as well...
I have the IRT in my mattoc and like it a lot
 

Flo33

Turbo Monkey
Mar 3, 2015
1,502
743
Styria
Fine print: if you convert an air sprung model coil there's no reverting back to air
Can't confirm, installed a Smashpot in a 36 Float, rode it ~12 months, put the air spring in again, did a couple of rides to check for any leakage, nothing. Sold the fork to a buddy and it's been flawless.
So maybe Manitou will be able to achieve this as well.
The Smashpot's spring has some shrinkage tape around it and that's doing the job.
 

jonKranked

Detective Dookie
Nov 10, 2005
70,707
13,275
media blackout
new kids bike from chromag:

 

slimshady

¡Mira, una ardilla!
If you can get past the looks, I'd say it's a pretty good approximation of what I'd ride:



 

Rhubarb

Monkey
Jan 11, 2009
381
171
If you can get past the looks, I'd say it's a pretty good approximation of what I'd ride:



I stumbled across Starling cycles the other day and got interested when I noticed they are located in my city. Then found their mullet bike which has the geo numbers I really like. So checked the pricing and nearly choked. I could not justify that kind of money in a millon Sundays.
 

HardtailHack

used an iron once
Jan 20, 2009
3,160
906
Maybe Fox (under the Marz brand) will bring back the Shiver

:D

I'd buy one, just for nostalgia
That's sorta how I ended up with a Z1, tried selling it for about half MSRP after a few rides but I'm still stuck with the POS.
Manitou FTW, fuck Fox.
 

ianjenn

Turbo Monkey
Sep 12, 2006
2,859
608
SLO
Screen Shot 2021-07-21 at 5.10.43 AM.png
Screen Shot 2021-07-21 at 5.11.02 AM.png



Man, this thing looks awesome. That LG is actually a LG......
 

Jm_

sled dog's bollocks
Jan 14, 2002
13,217
4,982
AK
View attachment 162462View attachment 162463


Man, this thing looks awesome. That LG is actually a LG......
Falling rate. Pivot point and draw a line straight up, swingarm eyelet in line with or ahead of this line means falling rate AND the front-wheel-side eyelet is elevated, which exaggerates the falling rate. The rate at which the rear eyelet gets closer to the front decreases throughout the arc of travel. With an air shock that means some pretty crazy mid-travel wallow too due to no correcting linkage to make mid-stroke more progressive, even if it doesn't bottom. Even the linkage bikes intended to run air shocks are usually progressive (especially for harder riding), only not nearly as much as coil ones. With an air shock and enough pressure/tokens you can probably get it to not bottom with an air shock, but mid stroke will be pretty bad and it'll never work right with a coil.
 
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vivisectxi

Monkey
Jan 14, 2021
100
92
yeast van
dumped all their resources into metallurgy & forgot about suspension kinematics (and geometry; not bothering to offer reach balanced cs lengths)? AND CANT FIT A GODDAM WATER BOTTLE (obviously the most egregious sin)?
 

Rhubarb

Monkey
Jan 11, 2009
381
171
454mm chainstays, across all sizes. Man I try to hover around 430-435 but realize 445 needs to be tried before denied, and isnt uncommon when looking at 29er geo. 354 sounds really long.

*edit - looks at Reach 500mm size large. Thats a little stretch. Looks at wheelbase 1299mm and realizes this is a Cadillac (or a Cotic).
 
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ianjenn

Turbo Monkey
Sep 12, 2006
2,859
608
SLO
Falling rate. Pivot point and draw a line straight up, swingarm eyelet in line with or ahead of this line means falling rate AND the front-wheel-side eyelet is elevated, which exaggerates the falling rate. The rate at which the rear eyelet gets closer to the front decreases throughout the arc of travel. With an air shock that means some pretty crazy mid-travel wallow too due to no correcting linkage to make mid-stroke more progressive, even if it doesn't bottom. Even the linkage bikes intended to run air shocks are usually progressive (especially for harder riding), only not nearly as much as coil ones. With an air shock and enough pressure/tokens you can probably get it to not bottom with an air shock, but mid stroke will be pretty bad and it'll never work right with a coil.
You must not have witnessed Shawn Collins winning SEMI-PRO aboard a 1999 proto Mountain Cycle Shockwave in 2002 it even had V Brakes. 60' doubles all day on the Falling Rate single-pivot! I mean the RN01 was a single pivot as well. Now that I think about it some of the better bikes I have ridden were SPs.....
 
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slimshady

¡Mira, una ardilla!
You must not have witnessed Shawn Collins winning SEMI-PRO aboard a 1999 proto Mountain Cycle Shockwave in 2002 it even had V Brakes. 60' doubles all day on the Falling Rate single-pivot! I mean the RN01 was a single pivot as well. Now that I think about it some of the better bikes I have ridden were SPs.....
This is one of those cases of "just because you can, it doesn't mean you should".
 
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Jm_

sled dog's bollocks
Jan 14, 2002
13,217
4,982
AK
You must not have witnessed Shawn Collins winning SEMI-PRO aboard a 1999 proto Mountain Cycle Shockwave in 2002 it even had V Brakes. 60' doubles all day on the Falling Rate single-pivot! I mean the RN01 was a single pivot as well. Now that I think about it some of the better bikes I have ridden were SPs.....
Oh yeah, nothing inherently wrong with a SP....sometimes challenging to make laterally stiff, but not impossibru. The thing is their rear suspension is pretty easy to analyze for LC. If the angle between the eyelets and the rear eyelet and the main pivot could remain 90 degrees throughout the travel, it would be linear, which wouldn't be ideal, but better than falling, but that can only exist at single point in travel (compared to a linkage bike that you could design to be linear if you wanted). So if the shock compresses beyond that line, it's falling. If the bike is set up so that the rear eyelet is way behind the main pivot line, and it never even gets to that point, it can be progressive through the travel. The issue is to do this you usually have to do something "extra" like point the front end of the shock towards the ground or use some kind of "pass through" the seat-tube for the shock or an interrupted seat tube, etc. To move that rear eyelet back, the seat tube is usually in the way, but you can move the entire thing forward and down and get the same effect, but then you need to reinforce the down tube significantly. There are a few other ways to achieve this geometry, but the basic principle is the same. Of course...there was that whole "progressive shock" debacle and it survives to some extent still today, but the problem is since the LR isn't changed through out the travel, the progressive spring ends up doing more duty than the damper and you still get some pretty janky travel.

This just looks like an attempt to make a bike and keep costs down and no thought went into the LC.

None of the better bikes I rode were monopivot bikes...but that's kind of the thing, it can be done decent, but it usually is not. I'm not sure they would ever ride decent with anything but a coil and the progressive LC setup. An air shock should have a curve in the middle of travel to help offset the flat mid-stroke and a progressive LC would mean extra harsh deep travel with an air shock and low to falling LC would mean blowing through mid-stroke.
 

ianjenn

Turbo Monkey
Sep 12, 2006
2,859
608
SLO
Oh yeah, nothing inherently wrong with a SP....sometimes challenging to make laterally stiff, but not impossibru. The thing is their rear suspension is pretty easy to analyze for LC. If the angle between the eyelets and the rear eyelet and the main pivot could remain 90 degrees throughout the travel, it would be linear, which wouldn't be ideal, but better than falling, but that can only exist at single point in travel (compared to a linkage bike that you could design to be linear if you wanted). So if the shock compresses beyond that line, it's falling. If the bike is set up so that the rear eyelet is way behind the main pivot line, and it never even gets to that point, it can be progressive through the travel. The issue is to do this you usually have to do something "extra" like point the front end of the shock towards the ground or use some kind of "pass through" the seat-tube for the shock or an interrupted seat tube, etc. To move that rear eyelet back, the seat tube is usually in the way, but you can move the entire thing forward and down and get the same effect, but then you need to reinforce the down tube significantly. There are a few other ways to achieve this geometry, but the basic principle is the same. Of course...there was that whole "progressive shock" debacle and it survives to some extent still today, but the problem is since the LR isn't changed through out the travel, the progressive spring ends up doing more duty than the damper and you still get some pretty janky travel.

This just looks like an attempt to make a bike and keep costs down and no thought went into the LC.

None of the better bikes I rode were monopivot bikes...but that's kind of the thing, it can be done decent, but it usually is not. I'm not sure they would ever ride decent with anything but a coil and the progressive LC setup. An air shock should have a curve in the middle of travel to help offset the flat mid-stroke and a progressive LC would mean extra harsh deep travel with an air shock and low to falling LC would mean blowing through mid-stroke.

Things looks sick but it being TI I would worry about FLEX......aside from the suspension curve.