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Trekrules

Turbo Monkey
Apr 12, 2007
1,226
148
Acto5ive's new P-Train 165 at bespoked 2022 tradeshow, this new P-Train is modulair with travel options from 145mm up to 175mm depending on shock length x stroke.Fork travel is from 160mm up to 190mm.

Acto5ive offers angleset cups that can go as slack as 63 degree, Seattube Angle is around 78 effective.
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Happymtb.fr

Turbo Monkey
Feb 9, 2016
1,589
906
SWE
Anybody here with knowledge about structural engineering?
My armchair engineering guts tell me that the lattice like rear triangle will not be as good as if it was built with tubes, or it will need to be unnecessary heavy to be as strong/stiff.

That's without considering it looks like a giant mud trap...
 

was?

Monkey
Mar 9, 2010
268
30
Dresden, Germany
Anybody here with knowledge about structural engineering?
My armchair engineering guts tell me that the lattice like rear triangle will not be as good as if it was built with tubes, or it will need to be unnecessary heavy to be as strong/stiff.

That's without considering it looks like a giant mud trap...
From my own experience, it’s plenty stiff but also considerably heavier than a tubed rear triangle. The seat- and chainstays have a cover for the cnc’d pockets, starting ca 20cm forward of the rear axle, so dirt flung by the tire won‘t collect there.
 

toodles

ridiculously corgi proportioned
Aug 24, 2004
4,659
3,557
Australia
u doubting german engineering?
I once had to cut a hole through the side a German brand million dollar industrial kettle to remove a 50mm diameter stub shaft from a gearbox. Lovely constructed equipment but I'm pretty sure when the engineers were designing it, considering serviceability was an extremely low priority.

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Jm_

sled dog's bollocks
Jan 14, 2002
16,629
7,592
AK
Audi/vw starter/alternator that requires removing the front half of the car. Also, timing chain in the back.
 

Leafy

Monkey
Sep 13, 2019
308
217
Audi/vw starter/alternator that requires removing the front half of the car. Also, timing chain in the back.
but did do the courtesy so make all the bolts accessible and write explicit instructions on how to do it, and use way better fastener coatings so they’re not frozen. Unlike the American cars where they expect you to either teleport the wrench in or hole saw the chassis because you can’t get a good purchase on the rusted ass bolt any other way and your afraid of how many other rusted ass bolts are between you and removing the cab to get to the bolt the right way.
 

StiHacka

Compensating for something
Jan 4, 2013
21,029
12,016
In hell. Welcome!
but did do the courtesy so make all the bolts accessible and write explicit instructions on how to do it, and use way better fastener coatings so they’re not frozen. Unlike the American cars where they expect you to either teleport the wrench in or hole saw the chassis because you can’t get a good purchase on the rusted ass bolt any other way and your afraid of how many other rusted ass bolts are between you and removing the cab to get to the bolt the right way.
Apparently you never worked on a New Beetle, or TT.
 

Westy

the teste
Nov 22, 2002
50,059
15,488
Sleazattle
Anybody here with knowledge about structural engineering?
My armchair engineering guts tell me that the lattice like rear triangle will not be as good as if it was built with tubes, or it will need to be unnecessary heavy to be as strong/stiff.

That's without considering it looks like a giant mud trap...

It does look like a "designer" gave an engineer a challenge. However with composites, the layup is just important as the shape so not much sense in making any conclusions based on the shape alone.
 

iRider

Turbo Monkey
Apr 5, 2008
5,094
2,526
It does look like a "designer" gave an engineer a challenge. However with composites, the layup is just important as the shape so not much sense in making any conclusions based on the shape alone.
This was a trick question. It is an aluminum frame. :D
 

sethimus

scroll all you want!
Feb 5, 2006
3,715
1,289
not in Whistler anymore :/
It does look like a "designer" gave an engineer a challenge. However with composites, the layup is just important as the shape so not much sense in making any conclusions based on the shape alone.
more like the designer is the engineer is the one man shop producing everything on his own cnc machine in dresden

 

Cerberus75

Monkey
Feb 18, 2017
507
190
My BMW is one of the easier vehicles I've ever owned to work on, but that's probably more of a reflection of the fact that it's kinda old, and an indictment of my past car purchases.
What year? I had an E36 M3 dead easy to work on. My SIL has the new M3 and it's a lot of nope to work on.
 

Jm_

sled dog's bollocks
Jan 14, 2002
16,629
7,592
AK
Modern cars ain't the same and I don't think it largely matters what car you are discussing. In generally, the smaller the engine bay, the worse it is, but stuff is just crammed in modern cars. It's got to have something to do with the design and fabrication process. As cars like the new M2 weigh 4000lbs, it's got to simply be the most cost-effective way for them to design a new car, to figure out how to add structure, weld or bond it in, fit in the parts they need, etc. Weight and serviceability aren't high on the list, as long as you can have a 231 step process to remove the engine out the bottom and get to the turbo encabulator, all is good. Most likely, if you wanted 3-d milled and forged structures, rather than the 2-d reinforcements and plates welded together, you'd increase cost a LOT...even though you'd save weight and free up a lot of space.

On the BMW, we had to lower the entire subframe to get the new anti-sway bars in there. Not as bad on the stinger, but the rear was absolute hell. Most of this stuff though isn't hell, it's just extremely tedious and time-consuming. It would be a lot faster with less stuff to remove or less steps, but nothing is getting simpler these days.

Look at that new hyper-souped up 4cyl AMG C-class. No F-ing way that'll be working right in 10 years IMO and it will be that much harder to repair.
 

ianjenn

Turbo Monkey
Sep 12, 2006
2,951
665
SLO
Modern cars ain't the same and I don't think it largely matters what car you are discussing. In generally, the smaller the engine bay, the worse it is, but stuff is just crammed in modern cars. It's got to have something to do with the design and fabrication process. As cars like the new M2 weigh 4000lbs, it's got to simply be the most cost-effective way for them to design a new car, to figure out how to add structure, weld or bond it in, fit in the parts they need, etc. Weight and serviceability aren't high on the list, as long as you can have a 231 step process to remove the engine out the bottom and get to the turbo encabulator, all is good. Most likely, if you wanted 3-d milled and forged structures, rather than the 2-d reinforcements and plates welded together, you'd increase cost a LOT...even though you'd save weight and free up a lot of space.

On the BMW, we had to lower the entire subframe to get the new anti-sway bars in there. Not as bad on the stinger, but the rear was absolute hell. Most of this stuff though isn't hell, it's just extremely tedious and time-consuming. It would be a lot faster with less stuff to remove or less steps, but nothing is getting simpler these days.

Look at that new hyper-souped up 4cyl AMG C-class. No F-ing way that'll be working right in 10 years IMO and it will be that much harder to repair.

Even my 7.3 Powerstroke gets me a bit nervous. If it has more than a PCV valve and 8 plug wires I will likely close the hood. I don't need much just 1100 NA HP.....





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norbar

KESSLER PROBLEM. Just cause
Jun 7, 2007
10,840
1,189
Warsaw :/
I once had to cut a hole through the side a German brand million dollar industrial kettle to remove a 50mm diameter stub shaft from a gearbox. Lovely constructed equipment but I'm pretty sure when the engineers were designing it, considering serviceability was an extremely low priority.
That's typical german engineering for you. As in engineers designing for engineers not for actual use and service. Sometimes it works great. Sometimes it makes you want to punch a wall.

btw. Did anyone here talk about Prime Bicycles? I know nothing outside that it's related to a guy who was a local santa distributor and used to be a team manager for the old Turner Gravity World Cup Team

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canadmos

Cake Tease
May 29, 2011
17,116
15,352
Canaderp
That's typical german engineering for you. As in engineers designing for engineers not for actual use and service. Sometimes it works great. Sometimes it makes you want to punch a wall.

btw. Did anyone here talk about Prime Bicycles? I know nothing outside that it's related to a guy who was a local santa distributor and used to be a team manager for the old Turner Gravity World Cup Team

View attachment 183713
Not sure, but I saw one of their DH bikes in Bromont recently. Looked nice, even if I didn't know what it was, I thought it was a Kona or something at first glance.
 

norbar

KESSLER PROBLEM. Just cause
Jun 7, 2007
10,840
1,189
Warsaw :/
Not sure, but I saw one of their DH bikes in Bromont recently. Looked nice, even if I didn't know what it was, I thought it was a Kona or something at first glance.
I am maybe planning to go on a bike trip with a company where the owner is a friend and has one so I might try it. Not my budget but I am curious. Still prefer the looks of the Antidote more if speaking Polish bikes but the geo here speaks to me more.

Then again I'm no longer chasing ultimate bikes. It has to work and have good geo. An enduro bike that fits my needs doesn't exist anyway (honestly it would be my current Capra geo and travel with Banshee bikes stiffness).
 

6thElement

Schrodinger's Immigrant
Jul 29, 2008
12,773
9,679
That's typical german engineering for you. As in engineers designing for engineers not for actual use and service. Sometimes it works great. Sometimes it makes you want to punch a wall.

btw. Did anyone here talk about Prime Bicycles? I know nothing outside that it's related to a guy who was a local santa distributor and used to be a team manager for the old Turner Gravity World Cup Team

View attachment 183713
Reminds me of a We are one Arrival.