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Rear suspension characteristics

Discussion in 'Cross Country, All Mountain & Trail Riding' started by Jimmy_Pop, Dec 28, 2005.

  1. Jimmy_Pop

    Jimmy_Pop Turbo Monkey

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    I've spent little time on a 2000 FSR w/ a Fox Air shock of some kind. For the longest time, i have only had one bike, my downhill bike.

    Ive really been enjoying this older, all black S-Works FSR, full XTR, crossmax ETC. It's alittle old school with the V brakes and all but it hauls as$.

    In general, Ive just noticed that when the rear suspension hits any kind of small bump, whether a blunt, square edge log/root or a small, smooth roller, the hit is transfered straight up the seatpost and pops my a$s right off the saddle. It feels totall ghey and i know it looks bad all bouncing off the saddle. It is annoying and screws up any kind of pedaling cadence i have going.

    Do the newer XC frame designs allow a more rearward axle path of travel? And make those type of hits less noticeable ?

    How do frames like the SC Blur and Intense Syper handle and pedal through the small hits on the trail. is it too much to ask to have those hits almost completely absorbed in the travel and not transfered up into the saddle ?? Im the type of rider who would rather pedal, manual and plow thru stuff rather than ride around it.

    thanks

    joel
     

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  2. Duzitall

    Duzitall Monkey

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    I can tell you that my Giant AC stays active pedaling and braking. It has a swinger (4 way?) coil. Spring may be a little soft for my largeness but it's a plush trail bike.

    Sounds like your shock needs adjustment. Is it a brain shock? My friend has an older Enduro with a brain. It was harsh until we dialed it out a little.
     
  3. Jimmy_Pop

    Jimmy_Pop Turbo Monkey

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    Thanks, I'll check out the shock. It has a Fox Float RC. It has lockout and i use that feature all the time. Im using most, but not all, of the travel. There is an o-ring on the shock and i can monitor how much travel is used. I dont know what the travel of the frame is, probably 90mm. I am assuming that because XC frames have such short travel, that frame design was even more critical to providing a smoother ride.

    Im still curious how the suspension differs between these old FSR's and the new frames out there. ARe there frames that are better at rolling over small bumps and not hanging up the rear wheel and losing momentum ?

    joel

    LOL at your sig Chris. Ah man, you edited it. leave it, i dont care, that was a funny thread.
     
  4. sanjuro

    sanjuro Tube Smuggler

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    I ride a Kona Dawg Primo, which is not known for its suspension prowess. However, it does a decent job, but I think the Fox Float AVA is responsible.

    If you have an older bike, it could be that your shock is blown. A new shock might solve this problem.
     
  5. Zark

    Zark Hey little girl, do you want some candy?

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    FSR's are pretty active under pedalling and braking, so I don't think the design is at fault. The limited travel and stiction of the air shock have more to do with what you are experiencing.

    Check to see you have the sag set correctly. 20-30% sag.
    It sounds like it might be slightly over pressure if you don't get full travel.
    I'd also consider sending the rear shock to PUSH industries for some custom valving, I'm sure they can get you the ride you are looking for.

    It sounds like you might like a longer travel trail bike instead of the racey FSR-XC
     
  6. Duzitall

    Duzitall Monkey

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    Ya Joel,

    I really got a laugh outa your reply to that thread. How come I can't see my sig but you can?

    I think Zark's right, you need a Nomad or 6.6 or a Reign or a MKIII or a 6 Pack or SX Trail or...well you get the picture :drool:
     
  7. Duzitall

    Duzitall Monkey

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    Myself, I firmly believe VPP (type) bikes are best at rolling over all size bumps/rocks/logs/etc. while maintaining momuntum. That's why my next trail bike will be another VPP (type). It works for Santa Cruz, Intense, Giant , Iron Horse and others.
     
  8. Westy

    Westy the teste

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    My friend had an S-works of the same era and it never felt right when compared to my Superlight. Just very harsh, I doubt it was the air shock itself but more to do with leverage ratios/rising rates. Any modern bike would be a huge performance wise.
     
  9. Jimmy_Pop

    Jimmy_Pop Turbo Monkey

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    Cool. Thanks guys for the replys.

    Im the type of ride who usually does a "factory" setup and never touches a bike again. I kinda adapt to whatever.

    But this is the first time I've noticed something bothersome about the way a bike handles. Im really not complaining, the bike is great looking and has very nice components and it was FREE to me. A hand-me-down from a great boss - a bike he raced but never rode anymore after getting a new one.

    Anyhoo, I'm keeping this bike as-is and will try to dial it in better. I will still persue getting a Nomad w/ a 36 & DHXA, my second dream bike.
    http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v626/Jimmy-pop/nomad1BR.jpg