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Shit that happens with Airlines, thread

Toshi

Harbinger of Doom
Oct 23, 2001
27,614
2,233
LOL. "travel voucher"

Probably worth less than the paper it's printed on.

I got one for a flight delay (albeit only $100, I think). It was pretty straightforward to redeem it as cash-equivalent on united.com.
 

6thElement

Schrodinger's Immigrant
Jul 29, 2008
4,939
2,544
I got a hundred bucks from Southwest at the weekend for a 3 hour delay. I'd have preferred to not have the delay causing my arrival at my hotel to be at 3AM though.
 

Pesqueeb

bicycle in airplane hangar
Feb 2, 2007
28,746
4,518
Riding the baggage carousel.
But given the storm, there were questions over why the flight was not cancelled before taking off, rather than trying to fly through the bad weather, with KGW reporting passengers saying there was little to no visibility with thunder and lighting during the attempted landing.
Oh, bullshit.

1. The aircraft is perfectly capable, you're just a bitch, nobody made you board.
2. If SW had canceled the flight, you'd be demanding compensation/lodging, even though they have no obligation if the cancel is due to weather.
 

Jm_

Turbo Monkey
Jan 14, 2002
9,655
2,017
AK
For some reason, the whole “stay 20 miles away from thunderstorms” recommendation goes out the window then it comes to airlines. I’m not sure why, you are taught over and over as a pilot to avoid them by at least this much, yet time after time they fly far closer to cells.
 

Pesqueeb

bicycle in airplane hangar
Feb 2, 2007
28,746
4,518
Riding the baggage carousel.
For some reason, the whole “stay 20 miles away from thunderstorms” recommendation goes out the window then it comes to airlines. I’m not sure why, you are taught over and over as a pilot to avoid them by at least this much, yet time after time they fly far closer to cells.
Fuel is expensive, yo!
 

Jm_

Turbo Monkey
Jan 14, 2002
9,655
2,017
AK
Yeah, that's going to probably be a big deal for the NTSB and they are going to crawl all up the airline's, the MRO's, the FAA certification and inspection's, and all sorts of asses to find out where the failures occurred. Engine parts are supposed to fly out the back of the engine for the most part and not pierce the fuselage. There are some that have been speculating that due to no significant catastrophic accidents in recent years, the NTSB has been starting to look at some of the smaller events in much greater detail with more resources than ever.
 

Pesqueeb

bicycle in airplane hangar
Feb 2, 2007
28,746
4,518
Riding the baggage carousel.
Yeah, that's going to probably be a big deal for the NTSB and they are going to crawl all up the airline's, the MRO's, the FAA certification and inspection's, and all sorts of asses to find out where the failures occurred. Engine parts are supposed to fly out the back of the engine for the most part and not pierce the fuselage. There are some that have been speculating that due to no significant catastrophic accidents in recent years, the NTSB has been starting to look at some of the smaller events in much greater detail with more resources than ever.
Apparently this is the second engine to come apart in cruise for SW in a year, both resulting in a damaged pressure vessel. I'd be awful nervous if I was employed in their engine shop.

Edit:
By the wrist/elbow. :panic:




Edit 2: The first failure I was thinking of was in 2016

Last year, the engine maker and the Federal Aviation Administration instructed airlines to make ultrasonic inspections of the fan blades of engines like those on the Southwest jet. The FAA said the move was prompted by a report of a fan blade failing and hurling debris. A Southwest spokeswoman said the engine that failed Tuesday was not covered by that directive, but the airline announced it would speed up ultrasonic inspections of fan blades of its CFM56-series engines anyway.

"There's a ring around the engine that is meant to contain the engine pieces when this happens," said John Goglia, a former NTSB member. "In this case it didn't. That's going to be a big focal point for the NTSB — why didn't (the ring) do its job?"

In 2016, a Southwest Boeing 737-700 blew an engine as it flew from New Orleans to Orlando, Florida, and shrapnel tore a 5-by-16-inch hole just above the wing. The plane landed safely. The NTSB said a fan blade had broken off, apparently because of metal fatigue.
 
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Jm_

Turbo Monkey
Jan 14, 2002
9,655
2,017
AK
Apparently this is the second engine to come apart in cruise for SW in a year, both resulting in a damaged pressure vessel. I'd be awful nervous if I was employed in their engine shop.
I wouldn't, the "engine shop" is probably in El Salvador or something. They've been outsourcing for a while.
 

KenW449

Thanos did nothing wrong
Jun 13, 2017
2,471
270
Floating down the whiskey river...
It broke a 9 year safety string
http://www.msn.com/en-us/news/us/death-on-southwest-plane-shatters-record-us-safety-string/ar-AAvZww2?ocid=ientp

"Almost 100 million U.S.-operated airline flights, carrying several billion people, had taken off and landed safely in this country over a nine-year span since the last time a passenger died in an accident.

That record for avoiding fatalities -- which had never been approached in the history of modern aviation -- was splintered in an instant Tuesday when an engine on a Southwest Airlines Co. plane exploded mid-air, spewing shrapnel into a window and killing a passenger."

And the passenger was
http://www.msn.com/en-us/news/us/southwest-airlines-victim-jennifer-riordan-was-thoughtful-leader-in-new-mexico/ar-AAw04sG?ocid=ientp
 

Pesqueeb

bicycle in airplane hangar
Feb 2, 2007
28,746
4,518
Riding the baggage carousel.

DaveW

Space Monkey
Jul 2, 2001
8,717
634
Karori, Poneke Te Ika-a-Maui
Yeah Local carrier Air New Zealand is having problems and cancelling flights due to bad motors too.
In their case it's Rolls Royce motors on the dreamliners being a bit shit.

Hey 'squeeb!
is it time for chanting a round of "If it's Boeing I ain't going!" :sarcastic: