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Shit that happens with Airlines, thread

Westy

the teste
Nov 22, 2002
42,926
8,735
Sleazattle
fuck.........

I had all kinds of drug and mental breakdown jokes ready until I saw that head check on the ground at the end


eeesh

I hope those dickbag cops didn't make it worse when they got to him
That shattered collar bone and dislocated shoulder probably absorbed a lot of energy.
 

KenW449

Thanos did nothing wrong
Jun 13, 2017
2,702
323
Floating down the whiskey river...
Why do people, who can seemingly walk fine down the jetway and everywhere else, have to grab the back of each seat when walking in the cabin?
Tradition?

Left FOD all over the damn place.

fuck.........

I had all kinds of drug and mental breakdown jokes ready until I saw that head check on the ground at the end


eeesh

I hope those dickbag cops didn't make it worse when they got to him
Darwinism is real!
 

Jm_

sled dog's bollocks
Jan 14, 2002
12,182
4,149
AK
The thing about transport category swept wing aircraft is their stall characteristics are real funny, like most straight-wing private aircraft have fairly pronounced stall indications and the lift curve changes direction rather abruptly at the stall point. These big transport category aircraft have a very "flattened" curve and it's very hard for pilots to know exactly where they are, as in if it's slightly before stall, slightly after stall, at stall, etc. This characteristic was screwing things up pretty bad for years as fighter-jocks ran airline training departments and instituted all kinds of fighter-jock maneuvers that don't work on airliners. Pilots weren't reacting before they had an issue, and when they had an issue, they were reacting incorrectly. The FAA had to significantly revamp airline training and mandate advanced upset/high angle-of-attack/unusual attitude training for all part 121 airlines (most airlines that use jets and some that use prop airplanes). The funny thing is that basically what they had to do was go back to what is taught at those very basic levels, but the more subtle nature of these big aircraft was leaving people thinking they could "power out of" stuff and that any loss of altitude during such a recovery was "bad". You are simply going to lose altitude to recover from something like this, but it got so bad they started failing pilots during their checks for losing any altitude, so then they wouldn't want to push the nose over like they should...

So I'm not sure if this article is really portraying stall tendencies in a realistic light. They get much more subtle at the high angles of attack in these kind of aircraft until things go wildly wrong and the aircraft starts dropping wings to 90 degrees of bank or more.
 
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Date: 27-NOV-2020
Time: 14:57
Type: Silhouette image of generic F900 model; specific model in this crash may look slightly different
Dassault Falcon 900EX
Owner/operator: Bond Aire LLC
Registration: N382KU
C/n / msn: 47
Fatalities: Fatalities: 0 / Occupants: 9
Other fatalities: 0
Aircraft damage: Unknown
Location: near Flying Cloud Airport (FCM/KFCM), Minneapolis, MN - United States of America
Phase: Initial climb
Nature: Executive
Departure airport: Minneapolis-Flying Cloud Airport, MN (FCM/KFCM)
Destination airport: Minneapolis-Flying Cloud Airport, MN (FCM/KFCM)
Narrative:
Aircraft returned to airport after a thunk and vibration. Post flight inspection revealed damage to #3 engine cowling.
 

KenW449

Thanos did nothing wrong
Jun 13, 2017
2,702
323
Floating down the whiskey river...
Supposedly, This dude is in one of the RV groups I am in on Facebook and he says a rep from the airlines was at his place within an hour or two and he signed a waiver and the airline rep wrote him a check for a new truck and RV on the spot.


View attachment 156956
He probably coulda bought 10 new trucks and RVs if he had not signed.
But im trusting Boeing less and less everyday.
 

Westy

the teste
Nov 22, 2002
42,926
8,735
Sleazattle
He probably coulda bought 10 new trucks and RVs if he had not signed.
But im trusting Boeing less and less everyday.
Boeing doesn't have much to do with this. It was a Pratt and Whitney engine that blew up. Airlines got to choose what engine they wanted a lot like choosing an outboard for a pontoon boat.
 

KenW449

Thanos did nothing wrong
Jun 13, 2017
2,702
323
Floating down the whiskey river...
Boeing doesn't have much to do with this. It was a Pratt and Whitney engine that blew up. Airlines got to choose what engine they wanted a lot like choosing an outboard for a pontoon boat.
True, but its also up to boeing mechs to keep it maintained, or whoever they sub-contract, because they do ALOT of that. They are like a revolving door in that aspect.
 
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Westy

the teste
Nov 22, 2002
42,926
8,735
Sleazattle
True, but its also up to boeing mechs to keep it maintained.
No

Airlines are responsible for maintaining their own planes. They may however contract maintenance to various suppliers. Engine manufacturers actually sell engines at a loss and make their profits with service contracts.

A lot of times the engines are purchased directly by the airlines to be installed on their planes. You don't want a middle man taking a cut on a $25,000,000 part.
 
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KenW449

Thanos did nothing wrong
Jun 13, 2017
2,702
323
Floating down the whiskey river...
No

Airlines are responsible for maintaining their own planes. They may however contract maintenance to various suppliers. Engine manufacturers actually sell engines at a loss and make their profits with service contracts.
Sorry, youre right. I havent had enough caffeine yet. I was just testing your knowledge.
I am also not too familiar with the commercial side of aviation, just DoD, and Boeing is dookie. We are about to absorb their work because they cant keep up with our workflow, even though they more than doubled the amount of time we have per plane.
 
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Jm_

sled dog's bollocks
Jan 14, 2002
12,182
4,149
AK
Boeing doesn't have much to do with this. It was a Pratt and Whitney engine that blew up. Airlines got to choose what engine they wanted a lot like choosing an outboard for a pontoon boat.
The other option is RR and they don't exactly have the most stellar rep right now either.
 

Westy

the teste
Nov 22, 2002
42,926
8,735
Sleazattle
The other option is RR and they don't exactly have the most stellar rep right now either.

Well it sounds like this isn't exactly a new thing and the FAA may have been looking the other way. Also that plane is 27 years old. I can only imagine how many hours it has on it.