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Shit that happens with Airlines, thread

Pesqueeb

bicycle in airplane hangar
Feb 2, 2007
33,397
7,831
Riding the baggage carousel.
Well it sounds like this isn't exactly a new thing and the FAA may have been looking the other way. Also that plane is 27 years old. I can only imagine how many hours it has on it.




It's kind of/sort of irrelevant how old the aircraft is. Guaranteed at that age the engine has been swapped out several times, and the fan blades have probably been swapped out of the engine too. If this is in fact a case of fan blade failure and not the inner stage turbine seal like we first speculated, the question will then become how many hours/cycles were on the engine and/or the blades and was United meeting inspection requirements on the blades, especially given the history of component failure.
 

chuffer

Monkey
Sep 2, 2004
893
259
McMinnville, OR
In the past decade of very regular business flying the most clapped out pieces of ancient shit I have ever flown in were on "tourist" routes. Specifically, SFO to HNL and IAH to SJO. I dunno if it is just chance, but every time I've flown those routes the planes have been downright scary. Like "...well, I guess I got to live a pretty full life..." kind of scary.

#cooluselessanecdotebrah
 

Westy

the teste
Nov 22, 2002
42,965
8,771
Sleazattle
In the past decade of very regular business flying the most clapped out pieces of ancient shit I have ever flown in were on "tourist" routes. Specifically, SFO to HNL and IAH to SJO. I dunno if it is just chance, but every time I've flown those routes the planes have been downright scary. Like "...well, I guess I got to live a pretty full life..." kind of scary.

#cooluselessanecdotebrah

Almost like airlines are aggressively cutting costs on price competitive routes. Almost like cheap ass tickets actually cost something.
 

kidwoo

Celebrating No-Pants Day
Aug 25, 2003
27,378
4,827
In my pants
Boeing doesn't have much to do with this. It was a Pratt and Whitney engine that blew up. Airlines got to choose what engine they wanted a lot like choosing an outboard for a pontoon boat.
And who decides what boxes are available to check of available approved engines when those airlines order those planes? :rofl:


By that logic alcoa is responsible for the cabin ripping apart.



We all know it was squeeb. It's honorable you're trying to cover for him but the truth will set us all free.

Squeeb. We know who you are. Anything you'd like to discuss? Anything relating to ball bearings perhaps?

 

Pesqueeb

bicycle in airplane hangar
Feb 2, 2007
33,397
7,831
Riding the baggage carousel.
And who decides what boxes are available to check of available approved engines when those airlines order those planes? :rofl:


By that logic alcoa is responsible for the cabin ripping apart.



We all know it was squeeb. It's honorable you're trying to cover for him but the truth will set us all free.

Squeeb. We know who you are. Anything you'd like to discuss? Anything relating to ball bearings perhaps?

I like to think of myself as a less well meaning Constantine Shaklin, but I'll take it as a compliment.
 

Pesqueeb

bicycle in airplane hangar
Feb 2, 2007
33,397
7,831
Riding the baggage carousel.
It's kind of/sort of irrelevant how old the aircraft is. Guaranteed at that age the engine has been swapped out several times, and the fan blades have probably been swapped out of the engine too. If this is in fact a case of fan blade failure and not the inner stage turbine seal like we first speculated, the question will then become how many hours/cycles were on the engine and/or the blades and was United meeting inspection requirements on the blades, especially given the history of component failure.