Quantcast

Single Speed

ndundiz

Chimp
Feb 7, 2008
12
0
Atlanta
I want to convert my bike to a single speed at the hub, but keep the 3-speeds at the crank...is this possible?

The problem I foresee is keeping tension on the chain.

Does anyone know of a product I can obtain that will solve this issue?

Thanks in advance for any advice...
 

MMcG

Ride till you puke!
Dec 10, 2002
15,458
9
Burlington, Connecticut
I want to convert my bike to a single speed at the hub, but keep the 3-speeds at the crank...is this possible?

The problem I foresee is keeping tension on the chain.

Does anyone know of a product I can obtain that will solve this issue?

Thanks in advance for any advice...

I gotta ask ya - why do you want to have this type of set up?
 

r464

Turbo Monkey
Oct 17, 2006
2,608
2
Earth
Look at the Paul Melvin.

http://www.paulcomp.com/melvin.html

One of the coolest things about the Melvin is that it allows two front chain rings to be used (of course this is no longer a single speed, sob, but can be very handy for loaded commuting) Because we use two pulleys, two chain rings with a maximum difference of twenty teeth can be used up front. With a little practice, a deft finger and a delicate heel make a fine front derailleur.
The Rohloff tensioner also takes up a lot of chain.
 

JRogers

talks too much
Mar 19, 2002
3,789
1
Claremont, CA
The easiest thing I could think of would be to, uhhh, run a rear derailleur...that would let you run 3 rings and stay SS by adjusting the limits or rigging it up otherwise....But I still wonder why anyone would do this...
 

ndundiz

Chimp
Feb 7, 2008
12
0
Atlanta
I commute by train in Atlanta...at the end of my train ride, I still have a 5 mile hump to work. I want to do this conversion to keep my bike as simple as possible and still have variable speeds. SS for the trail, variable for commuting. Triple at the crank and SS at the hub seemed simple enough. Maybe not...

Not all of us can have two bikes! :)

Thanks for the advice!
 

BikeGeek

BrewMonkey
Jul 2, 2001
4,459
118
Hershey, PA
What does that set-up run? Where can I buy? Is there a cheaper version ? Would shifting be the same as any other multi-speed?
- Mucho $
- Don't know.
- You can do the same thing with 2 rings on a crank and 2 cassette cogs with a bunch of spacers. All you need to do is figure out two gearing options that would use the same chain length.
- There is no "shifting." You're either in one combo or the other. I don't think it's possible to change without stopping.

Like MMcG said, an easier option would be to go with a single chainring and then as many gears on the hub as you feel you need. There are plenty of tensioners on the market designed to keep your chain on the front while allowing shifting in the rear. I used to run a 1x7 on my commuter with a 42t in the front and a 7-spd 11-22 cassette in the rear.
 

ndundiz

Chimp
Feb 7, 2008
12
0
Atlanta
thanks geek and everyone for their help...after heavy consideration and common sense, I realized that what I wanted to achieve would be next to impossible w/o some chain line issues!

Going to just run one chain ring and 3 cogs in the back. Anyone have any solid ratios for a commuter/trail runner?

thanks again!
 

LordOpie

MOTHER HEN
Oct 17, 2002
21,027
3
Denver
thanks geek and everyone for their help...after heavy consideration and common sense, I realized that what I wanted to achieve would be next to impossible w/o some chain line issues!

Going to just run one chain ring and 3 cogs in the back. Anyone have any solid ratios for a commuter/trail runner?

thanks again!
Stop.

Do yourself a favor and reconsider MMcG's suggestion...
I would use one chainring up front and buy a cassette style SS hub and set it up as a dingle speed.

Just my two cents.
An internally geared rear hub will allow you to have gears while minimizing maintenance and maximizing realibility.

click link for an example of several kinds of geared hubs.

My next city/commuter bike will have an internal geared hub with an internal coaster drum brake.
 

ndundiz

Chimp
Feb 7, 2008
12
0
Atlanta
I read that IGh's are not great off-road unless you drop a couple grand...true?

I guess I should have mentioned that I have a limited budget...plus the threat of the bike being stolen is imminent! I would hate to spend hundreds of dollars on a bike to have it stolen.

thx for the suggestion though!
 

OGRipper

back alley ripper
Feb 3, 2004
9,933
359
NORCAL is the hizzle
If you are going to ride this rig off road you are going to need a chain guide or front der up front as well as a decent tensioning device like a rear der out back. I've tried riding a multi-gear set up without something to hold the front end together and the chain gets thrown easily on any traili.

We don't know what parts you already have so it is hard to say. You might be able to use a cheap front der as a chainguide up front, then run a multi-gear cassette or freewheel out back. If you already have a triple crankset you could also run a front derailleur, three rings up front, then one cog out back and keep your rear der purely as a tensioner. If you going to do that, however, you might as well run multiple gears out back too.

There are ways to do what you want to do but you are so far away from a single speed that I don't really see the point, other than to be different, which is not a good enough reason for me. (You might feel otherwise, and if so, rock it.)
 

ndundiz

Chimp
Feb 7, 2008
12
0
Atlanta
I always want to be different...that is no question! I just wanted to keep cables short and mechanics to a minimum.

Thanks for the advice...
 

ferday

Chimp
Jan 3, 2008
34
0
calgary, AB
the front derailleur is one of the biggest problems in the drivetrain....run 1 chainring and 3 cogs, NOT the other way around.

make sure to use the appropriate spacers between your cogs. i would personally run a 32t chainring up front, with a 16, 18, 20 cog setup. that would give you a good pavement gear (32x14) and a good climbing gear (32x22) and should allow for an excellent chainline.

option 2 is to run 2 chainrings and 2 cogs with a chain tensioner. for example, a 44 and 32 chainrings, with a 20 and 16 cogs would give you a good trail gear (32x20) and a great pavement gear (44x16). you would of course have to shift by hand....
 

ndundiz

Chimp
Feb 7, 2008
12
0
Atlanta
Thanks for the ratio...that is what I needed. However, I have a possible lock on a used 44t Race Face crank. What would you pair w/ that in the back? And does the spacing of the cogs depend on their independent sizes or chain line?

I just realized...how many threads start off in the appropriate forum, but towards the end they belong in another? :poster_oops:
 

ferday

Chimp
Jan 3, 2008
34
0
calgary, AB
cog spacing depends on chainline.

as far as a 44t ring...if you are using a derailleur and a couple cogs, it depends on what kind of cogs you use. if you break a cassette, you could use a 28t cog which would make a decent trail gear for hilly terrain. True SS cogs are only (easily) available up to 22t.
44x22 is an ok trail gear if you don't have any steep terrain, 44x16 is a great all-round pavement gear.
 

ndundiz

Chimp
Feb 7, 2008
12
0
Atlanta
...so 44t chainring and 28t-22t-16t cog? 28-22 is not too big of a jump? Is there anything special I need to do to the standard 7-8-9 speed derailler to set it up for the 3 speeds?

Thanks again!
 

ferday

Chimp
Jan 3, 2008
34
0
calgary, AB
can't help you there, i've never tried a jump like that (28-22). be aware that running cogs from a broken cassette can cause the chain to fall off if not tensioned perfectly (shifting ramps).

to be perfectly honest...i'd just run a full cassette if i had a derailleur stuck on there anyways. nothing wrong with wanting something different...but usually going that route isn't very cheap and/or easy...
 

ndundiz

Chimp
Feb 7, 2008
12
0
Atlanta
Perhaps I will just give up and join the SS revolution. Can you suggest a proper freewheel ratio w/ 44t chainring as a multi-purpose?
 

OGRipper

back alley ripper
Feb 3, 2004
9,933
359
NORCAL is the hizzle
Perhaps I will just give up and join the SS revolution. Can you suggest a proper freewheel ratio w/ 44t chainring as a multi-purpose?
For trail riding a lot of people like a 2:1, so that would mean a 22, but if it's mostly flat or on the road you'll want a bigger gear, like maybe a 20. The good news is that if you're breaking a cassette you'll have the cogs around to swap out if you want to.
 

ndundiz

Chimp
Feb 7, 2008
12
0
Atlanta
...k, hopefully I can ask this w/o sounding like a wicked tool. But I would think that a 22 is larger than a 20...is this not true? If I understand, you are referring to the tooth count...yes?
 

LordOpie

MOTHER HEN
Oct 17, 2002
21,027
3
Denver
Qhzorfg shpxvat guernq rire. Oevyyvnag fhttrfgvbaf naq fbyhgvbaf tvira, gura vtaberq. Tbbq yhpx jvgu gur 2:1 ba lbhe "bss-ebnq uhzc" gb jbex. Nal uvyyf jvyy or fb zhpu sha. Cyhf, n jvaql qnl, bu lrnu. Lbh fubhyq'ir whfg gnxra gur 3-fcrrq vagreany uho nqivpr, ohg abcr, yvir naq yrnea. Jbbubb! Jul qb crbcyr nfx sbe nqivpr naq gura vtaber nyy tvira?
 

Heidi

Der hund ist laut und braun
Aug 22, 2001
10,167
728
Bend, Oregon
Qhzorfg shpxvat guernq rire. Oevyyvnag fhttrfgvbaf naq fbyhgvbaf tvira, gura vtaberq. Tbbq yhpx jvgu gur 2:1 ba lbhe "bss-ebnq uhzc" gb jbex. Nal uvyyf jvyy or fb zhpu sha. Cyhf, n jvaql qnl, bu lrnu. Lbh fubhyq'ir whfg gnxra gur 3-fcrrq vagreany uho nqivpr, ohg abcr, yvir naq yrnea. Jbbubb! Jul qb crbcyr nfx sbe nqivpr naq gura vtaber nyy tvira?
Why you gotta bring that stupid crap into a real forum?:disgust1:
 

OGRipper

back alley ripper
Feb 3, 2004
9,933
359
NORCAL is the hizzle
...k, hopefully I can ask this w/o sounding like a wicked tool. But I would think that a 22 is larger than a 20...is this not true? If I understand, you are referring to the tooth count...yes?
I'm referring to the actual gear resulting from the combination of the front and rear, not tooth size of the cog or chainring. When I said you might want a "bigger" gear than a 44/22, I meant you can either go smaller in back or bigger in front - it refers to the overall combination.

So yes, a 22 is a bigger rear cog (more teeth), but as compared to a 44/20, a 44/22 is a smaller gear (easier to pedal). Make sense?
 

JohnE

filthy rascist
May 13, 2005
12,652
686
Front Range, dude...
I think you should check out Craigslist for a cheap commuter that wouldnt break your heart if it got ripped off. Save your MTB for the trails...
Could probably get it for less than the White set up.

Just my 2c.
 

Wumpus

makes avatars better
Dec 25, 2003
8,163
154
Six Shooter Junction
...k, hopefully I can ask this w/o sounding like a wicked tool. But I would think that a 22 is larger than a 20...is this not true? If I understand, you are referring to the tooth count...yes?


Maybe this will help -- Gear inch calculator -- input the ring sizes and it gives you gear inches. If you input 32x16 and 44x22, you will get 52 gear inches for both. The bigger the gear inch, the 'bigger' the gear. http://www.sheldonbrown.com/gears/


I did know one lady that had the three rings up front one in the rear. Not sure how it worked, but she had her freewheel sandwiched by two guards. I don't remember any rear derailer/tensioner, but it has been awhile.
 

Jibby

Chimp
Mar 17, 2008
14
0
Madison
Eh...so...you want to have gears...but you ...don't want to have gears...
Personally, I don't see what's so freakin' complex about a cassette and a derailleur that you need to overcomplicate your life by trying to run a triple chainring and one gear on your cassette hub. A derailleur is not a complex piece of machinery...it just isn't, so I think people should stop complicating their lives by 'simplfying' their bikes.

My jump bike is a single speed purely from necessity; I couldn't keep a derailleur in one piece! I broke some part of my drivetrain once a week! So I dumped the gears.

Single speeds are for riders who are good at or would like to improve upon pedaling and riding form, riders who would otherwise be breaking parts all the time and weight weenies. Apparently they're a part of a growing group of people who feel a derailleur is as complex a machine as a particale accelerator and need to abandon it all in the name of simplicity.

My final advice? Get a single chainring, (since you're commuting I suggest somewhere in the 36-40T range) and run an 8 spd or six or whatever you feel is simpler cassette with a single rear derailleur.
 

BikeGeek

BrewMonkey
Jul 2, 2001
4,459
118
Hershey, PA
Single speeds are for riders who are good at or would like to improve upon pedaling and riding form, riders who would otherwise be breaking parts all the time and weight weenies. Apparently they're a part of a growing group of people who feel a derailleur is as complex a machine as a particale accelerator and need to abandon it all in the name of simplicity.
Weird. All the singlespeeders I ride with do it because it's fun.
 

killthecar

Chimp
Apr 3, 2008
6
0
Yakima, Washington
I commute by train in Atlanta...at the end of my train ride, I still have a 5 mile hump to work. I want to do this conversion to keep my bike as simple as possible and still have variable speeds. SS for the trail, variable for commuting. Triple at the crank and SS at the hub seemed simple enough. Maybe not...

Not all of us can have two bikes! :)

Thanks for the advice!

You could just build up a rear wheel with an internally geared hub. SRAM makes some decent ones they range from 3spd-9spd. They are virtually maintenance free and plus it cleans up the lines of your bike!
 

Zone 3

Chimp
Apr 15, 2008
10
0
I read that IGh's are not great off-road unless you drop a couple grand...true?

I guess I should have mentioned that I have a limited budget...plus the threat of the bike being stolen is imminent! I would hate to spend hundreds of dollars on a bike to have it stolen.

thx for the suggestion though!
We built my wifes "Bad News" frame up with the Shimano Alfine 8 speed hub and it's run without a hitch for a year now in rough stuff, mud and sandy tracks.

I tried to convert her to the dark side but she just refuses to let go of the gears thing.
 

Attachments