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So seriously...why not a single crown for even serious DH?

DirtEveryDay

Turbo Monkey
Nov 24, 2003
2,695
4
Pacific North Wet
I fail to really understand everyone's fear of the single crown for DH. Failure really just doesn't strike me as a concern, not with todays forks. The only failures I've seen on ANY forks recently has been shattered lowers, which, obviously all forks have.
The ONLY reason I THOUGHT I wanted a DC for was for an integrated stem so I don't have to worry about the bars facing north and south after a crash and so I don't have to worry about the bars spinning around 3 times when I only had enough brake line for 2...
But I just started noticing that most guys with Boxxers, etc still run a standard ol stem anyway, defeating THAT purpose.
But a SC fork that hasn't seen 15 stacks in the same season or any serious wrecks...? What's the fear? Marzocchi has some serious steertube action going on, and now there's even the 1.5 versions.... Strength of a DC with a little diet to boot...what am I not seeing?
 

demo 9

Turbo Monkey
Jan 31, 2007
5,911
45
north jersey
twisting in rocks, my fox 40 has wacked the frame and saved me more than once. but honestly i think that more people will start using them... just not me
 
Oct 14, 2007
394
0
the short step steering is great...i have a totem so I would front...but the high speed control needs some getting use to...more twitchy in that respect...where i ride though mostly wood slaloms...so the SC is best and in technical areas is da s**t
 

dhmike

Turbo Monkey
Dec 20, 2006
4,307
42
Boise Idaho
well i just got smoked today in my dh race by a guy with single crown.so i don't know what your dh conditions are like so i say try the single crown if you don't like it you can always throw on a double crown.
 

FlyinPolack

Monkey
Jul 16, 2007
371
0
As soon as they start making Mx bikes with single crowns, I'll get one for DH.
A snapped steerer tube at 40+ mph can =death. No thanks.
Place a helmet cam facing down from you're Handlebars (aimed at you're fork legs). Watch the forward/backward movement of a singleclamp, vs a triple clamp on the trail. freakin scary.
 

DirtEveryDay

Turbo Monkey
Nov 24, 2003
2,695
4
Pacific North Wet
Just thinkin, I'm gettin an ECD soon here and the HA is like 64.5* and I love ALLLLLL kinds of riding. Prob gonna demo a Boxxer WC for this season, but the 66 will go back on when I'm not racin. I just have a feeling that the 65*-or-so HA that the single crown will give me should be about perfect. Still slack with a low front end. And as far as travel goes...what I can't get done in 7" I'm not going to get done in 8"...
So I'm bettin the SC won't come back off once it goes on!
 

no skid marks

Monkey
Jan 15, 2006
2,514
26
ACT Australia
Single crowns have a higher height for the same travel. They are heavier for the safe strength.They're flexier.They do not stop forks spinning in a crash or whilst riding. They WILL NOT LAST AS LONG. They heve less room for internals. I am talking theory here,not comparing forks,sure a Totem would be stiffer than an old RST Hi 5.
Don't confuse less travel as the topic discussed here.
 

DirtEveryDay

Turbo Monkey
Nov 24, 2003
2,695
4
Pacific North Wet
As soon as they start making Mx bikes with single crowns, I'll get one for DH.
A snapped steerer tube at 40+ mph can =death. No thanks.
Place a helmet cam facing down from you're Handlebars (aimed at you're fork legs). Watch the forward/backward movement of a singleclamp, vs a triple clamp on the trail. freakin scary.
Actually...isn't Pastrana trying to get one made so he can bar spin his friggin moto?
 

DirtEveryDay

Turbo Monkey
Nov 24, 2003
2,695
4
Pacific North Wet
Single crowns have a higher height for the same travel. They are heavier for the safe strength.They're flexier.They do not stop forks spinning in a crash or whilst riding. They WILL NOT LAST AS LONG. They heve less room for internals. I am talking theory here,not comparing forks,sure a Totem would be stiffer than an old RST Hi 5.
Mmm...no, I replaced my 888 with Risse flats for the 06 66 I have on now and dropped an inch. Right now, with 2.5"s, a 66RC2X, an E13 Zerostack headset, zero-rise stem and 1.5" risers, I'm right at a39.5 inch bar height.
 

DirtEveryDay

Turbo Monkey
Nov 24, 2003
2,695
4
Pacific North Wet
And as far as "more room for internals" goes... what's it needed for? More oil capacity? Only reason you need more oil capacity is for less aeration(sp)...I really don't think that's a huge issue unless you're tied to the back of the Terrible Hurst Bros on the 1000, and then a DC might be kinda nice... But I took that into consideration when I switched and just change the oil a little more often.
But I mean, I ALREADY DH it now, and no one seems to question it. I mention I'm gettin an ECD and suddenly I need a new fork for the same stuff. Yeah, I DO plan on trying to get to a lot of the MSC races this year, so it WOULD def be something to consider. But I took off the tuned 888, threw on a stock 66RC2X and I don't notice ANYTHING other than expensive stems slip, cheap stems grip and I don't have those two death spikes on each side of the stem staring me down the whole time!lol
And the 66 IS lighter.
 

no skid marks

Monkey
Jan 15, 2006
2,514
26
ACT Australia
Mmm...no, I replaced my 888 with Risse flats for the 06 66 I have on now and dropped an inch. Right now, with 2.5"s, a 66RC2X, an E13 Zerostack headset, zero-rise stem and 1.5" risers, I'm right at a39.5 inch bar height.
Different amount of travel.
I said I was talking theory(fact),not comparing models.
Is the 66 as stiff?
Getting rid of the knee cap eaters is a plus,you could run a slightly shorter top tube if desred.
This has all been discussed at length.Do a search.
 

ChrisKring

Turbo Monkey
Jan 30, 2002
2,395
4
Grand Haven, MI
Yeah, TP tried a SC fork at the Xgames or gravity games a couple of years ago. It worked out pretty good. ;) google for the video of it breaking on the first jump.

As pointed out above, a SC fork will be either: Heavier, weaker or flexier than a DC fork. It's just statics.
 

DirtEveryDay

Turbo Monkey
Nov 24, 2003
2,695
4
Pacific North Wet
Different amount of travel.
I said I was talking theory(fact),not comparing models.
Is the 66 as stiff?
Getting rid of the knee cap eaters is a plus,you could run a slightly shorter top tube if desred.

That's fine, I'm not attacking you or anything. I ASKED for input!
As for stiffness, I REALLY can't tell any difference. I didn't change any other components to mess things up from what I can remember, and I've NEVER felt the need to shy away from something because I "didn't have a DC fork."
I just threw on a stem and the same bars. Oh! I DID put on wider bars out of a silly fear of the bars getting ripped out of my hands and stabbing me in the beer bag. Nothing retarded, I WAS just running like a 26" bar, on 28"ers for life now.
And I should mention that I am NOT a monstertrucker. I pick lines pretty carefully, so that may have a lot to do with a lot of things.
And that's EXACTLY where my bud just cracked his 66. Steertube was fine and Zocchi gave him a little extra for it in trade for an 08 66 cuz the steertube was just dandy.
 

DirtEveryDay

Turbo Monkey
Nov 24, 2003
2,695
4
Pacific North Wet
Yeah, TP tried a SC fork at the Xgames or gravity games a couple of years ago. It worked out pretty good. ;) google for the video of it breaking on the first jump.

As pointed out above, a SC fork will be either: Heavier, weaker or flexier than a DC fork. It's just statics.
That doesn't solve anything, what fork was it? And it also doesn't matter if it was fuggin yard-darted it into the ground.
What are "statics?"
And that's some fine speculation there, but I've got plenty of my own. Come back with some STATISTICS, please.
 

DirtEveryDay

Turbo Monkey
Nov 24, 2003
2,695
4
Pacific North Wet
Ck, your last comment cracks me up! Pretty much the most useless reply I've ever gotten to a thread!
So....do ALL DJ guys ride...DC forks then? And I've just not noticed?
 

no skid marks

Monkey
Jan 15, 2006
2,514
26
ACT Australia
As for stiffness, I REALLY can't tell any difference.
I just threw on a stem and the same bars. Oh! I DID put on wider bars out of a silly fear of the bars getting ripped out of my hands and stabbing me in the beer bag. Nothing retarded, I WAS just running like a 26" bar, on 28"ers for life now.
And I should mention that I am NOT a monstertrucker. I pick lines pretty carefully, so that may have a lot to do with a lot of things.
And that's EXACTLY where my bud just cracked his 66. Steertube was fine and Zocchi gave him a little extra for it in trade for an 08 66 cuz the steertube was just dandy.
Possibly you preferre the more consistent geometry provided by less travel. Possibly you were and still are running a bigger fork than you need.
Wider bars would help hold a line better.
Possibly the 66 braces are cracking due to overbuilt single crowns. With tripple crowns the stress is spread further over both crowns. therefore allowing more shock absorbtion through the longer stanchions(or just from more travel=longer stanchion).
 

no skid marks

Monkey
Jan 15, 2006
2,514
26
ACT Australia
Ck, your last comment cracks me up! Pretty much the most useless reply I've ever gotten to a thread!
So....do ALL DJ guys ride...DC forks then? And I've just not noticed?
Chill out mate,don't be so rude. We're all trying to learn and bennefit each other here.
CK did neglect to add a few other things to the equation like height and travel. But I'm sure his point was just,you're wrong,and he didn't really bother with the facts as I had already stated most of them.
Getting hung up on spelling and grammar to win a debate and make someone look bad is so stupid,annoying and wrong.Fight a fair fight or **** off to the literary forum.Not saying people shouldn't make an effort to spell.
 

DirtyMike

Turbo Fluffer
Aug 8, 2005
14,239
826
My own world inside my head
I Hate to say this, but My 66 Is not heavier than an 888, and I cannot tell a difference in flex or twitch. It is however Tall. I weigh in at 250 with gear, So far this year I have absolutly beaten on my bike, Had a more than my share of hard wrecks, I am not in the least worried about breaking the steerer, Nor bending the stanctions.

With all that said, let say as to why I chose teh 66. First off, I can only afford one bike, So DH and trails are on the same bike, I have the 66 ETA rc2, So when it comes to climbing I can drop the fork down 170 mm, Also when I am not DHing, and I am out trailriding, I get more mauverability<sp>/quicksteer whatever you want to call it.


Now, with that said, I have a question, And this pertains to Marzocchi products, which of the internals between the 66 and 888 are different, I have rebuilt both and just dont see the difference in the internals, Aside from the springs of coarse.
 

DirtEveryDay

Turbo Monkey
Nov 24, 2003
2,695
4
Pacific North Wet
Possibly you preferre the more consistent geometry provided by less travel. Possibly you were and still are running a bigger fork than you need.
Wider bars would help hold a line better.
Possibly the 66 braces are cracking due to overbuilt single crowns. With tripple crowns the stress is spread further over both crowns. therefore allowing more shock absorbtion through the longer stanchions(or just from more travel=longer stanchion).
It's the same lowers for the dual and the single crown fork(Marzocchi). So, if anything, the 888's would be cracking more lowers due to the flex your're saying an overbuilt singlecrown wouldn't have. Magnesium doesn't like flex. And then you would also be saying that the singlecrown is actually STRONGER than the dual.
And I think CK can handle it, he jumps in with enough stuff like that and USUALLY a ton of facts and numbers and other crap that no one wants to read that I'm actually surprised. Maybe even a little dissappointed in him!
Just the facts, ma'am...
 

ChrisKring

Turbo Monkey
Jan 30, 2002
2,395
4
Grand Haven, MI
That doesn't solve anything, what fork was it? And it also doesn't matter if it was fuggin yard-darted it into the ground.
What are "statics?"
And that's some fine speculation there, but I've got plenty of my own. Come back with some STATISTICS, please.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Statics

Statics is the branch of physics concerned with the analysis of loads (force, torque/moment) on physical systems in static equilibrium, that is, in a state where the relative positions of subsystems do not vary over time, or where components and structures are at rest under the action of external forces of equilibrium. In other words it is how forces are transmitted through the members in an object such as a crane from where it is applied on the object, the hanging end, to where it is supported from, the base of the crane.
Do you understand the meaning of statics now?

Anyway, the reason why dirt jumpers can get away with a single crown for is that the moment arm of a short travel or rigid fork is much shorter than an 8" travel DH fork. Furthermore, they are typically smoother than a DH rider and therefore the forces are lower.

Here is some further reading:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Strength_of_materials
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moment_arm

While the above links will not give you a college education in engineering, it might help you understand the reason why some thing are the way they are. I am very frustrated with people assuming that everything in the bike industry is a big conspiracy as if the marketing department told the engineering department to invent new laws of physics to sell stuff. Well, maybe some companies do. :disgust1:
 

DirtEveryDay

Turbo Monkey
Nov 24, 2003
2,695
4
Pacific North Wet
I Hate to say this, but My 66 Is not heavier than an 888, and I cannot tell a difference in flex or twitch. It is however Tall. I weigh in at 250 with gear, So far this year I have absolutly beaten on my bike, Had a more than my share of hard wrecks, I am not in the least worried about breaking the steerer, Nor bending the stanctions.

With all that said, let say as to why I chose teh 66. First off, I can only afford one bike, So DH and trails are on the same bike, I have the 66 ETA rc2, So when it comes to climbing I can drop the fork down 170 mm, Also when I am not DHing, and I am out trailriding, I get more mauverability<sp>/quicksteer whatever you want to call it.


Now, with that said, I have a question, And this pertains to Marzocchi products, which of the internals between the 66 and 888 are different, I have rebuilt both and just dont see the difference in the internals, Aside from the springs of coarse.
It IS pretty tall, considering. Which year is yours? I think it was the 05s that were actually a tad taller than the 888s, no?
And yeah, I don't know what the difference is in the valving and stuff. I basically called up Zocchi and asked them which 66 felt EXACTLY like my 888r and they sent me the RC2X. And I can't tell.
Oh, and the comment about me possibly still being on the wrong fork? YEAH, maybe! Well, not so much anymore as I'm going to be doing more "real" DH, but for the stuff around here, I would LOVE a 6" fork with the same ride quality. I've NEVER EVER bottomed a fork out. But like I said, I pick and choose my lines. It makes me a bit slower, but it's so much more fun being smooth than fast. Soon I'll find my happy medium between the two!
 

DirtyMike

Turbo Fluffer
Aug 8, 2005
14,239
826
My own world inside my head
I just wanted to fill in some info with my last peice, and I of coarse dont want to step on any feet here, But I do have a question for everyone who is slamming on the SC forks, Have you all personally ridden both for any length of time, and have you serviced them yourselves to personally see that they are wearing out faster than DC forks? If so great, like I started with though, I dont want to upset anyone, just want to make a point.
 

DirtyMike

Turbo Fluffer
Aug 8, 2005
14,239
826
My own world inside my head
It IS pretty tall, considering. Which year is yours? I think it was the 05s that were actually a tad taller than the 888s, no?
And yeah, I don't know what the difference is in the valving and stuff. I basically called up Zocchi and asked them which 66 felt EXACTLY like my 888r and they sent me the RC2X. And I can't tell.
Oh, and the comment about me possibly still being on the wrong fork? YEAH, maybe! Well, not so much anymore as I'm going to be doing more "real" DH, but for the stuff around here, I would LOVE a 6" fork with the same ride quality. I've NEVER EVER bottomed a fork out. But like I said, I pick and choose my lines. It makes me a bit slower, but it's so much more fun being smooth than fast. Soon I'll find my happy medium between the two!


Mines an 07, last year the 66 has the ETA.



Oh and By the way, It was Marzocchi that sugested the 66 rc2 ETA over there super T for DH riding and racing. I was actually calling to order the SuperT, and In there own words, the 66 is Stiffer, and has better control....
 

DirtEveryDay

Turbo Monkey
Nov 24, 2003
2,695
4
Pacific North Wet
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Statics



Do you understand the meaning of statics now?

Anyway, the reason why dirt jumpers can get away with a single crown for is that the moment arm of a short travel or rigid fork is much shorter than an 8" travel DH fork. Furthermore, they are typically smoother than a DH rider and therefore the forces are lower.

Here is some further reading:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Strength_of_materials
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moment_arm

While the above links will not give you a college education in engineering, it might help you understand the reason why some thing are the way they are. I am very frustrated with people assuming that everything in the bike industry is a big conspiracy as if the marketing department told the engineering department to invent new laws of physics to sell stuff. Well, maybe some companies do. :disgust1:
THERE IT IS!!!!!!
See!?

Glad you didn't let me down with all the links to things I didn't really ever want to read... I might read that stuff, but not tonight.
That...stuff...you posted still doesn't solve anything. Technically, I'm probably a sociopath, but until I'm tested I just don't like people very much.
All I've seen and heard here tonight are people who run dualcrowns simply because they apparently might make them for some reason or another, but no one really knows why and no one has ever had a personal failure from STRICTLY dh'n it. There's always some other factor to a failure. And of the failures we HAVE seen, none are SC -only failures, i.e.-a snapped steerer tube or stanchions seperated from the crown, which is the only thing I'm concerned about.
So what was that fork and what did it fail on?
 

DirtEveryDay

Turbo Monkey
Nov 24, 2003
2,695
4
Pacific North Wet
I just wanted to fill in some info with my last peice, and I of coarse dont want to step on any feet here, But I do have a question for everyone who is slamming on the SC forks, Have you all personally ridden both for any length of time, and have you serviced them yourselves to personally see that they are wearing out faster than DC forks? If so great, like I started with though, I dont want to upset anyone, just want to make a point.

Man, what has this forum come to when guys are scared to step on toes?
I've been on both types for two years each, didn't really have any issues with either though. I had a TON of probs with an earlier SuperT just trying to get the thing dialed and to hold together.
I just change the oil about every 2 months and watch for any serious silver coloring. I've banged on my 66 much harder than my 888, and I'm very seriously considering just racing it this season as well, and forgetting the DC fork. I'll pull it all apart here before spring arrives and check it all out, but not concerned about seeing anything bad.
 

DirtyMike

Turbo Fluffer
Aug 8, 2005
14,239
826
My own world inside my head
Yeah I am racing My 66 with no problems at all, and I am loving every minute of it. I am planning on posted an extended reveiw later this year when I pull it apart and overhaul it, fluid condition, levels, seal condition, bushing conditions ETC.


As far as stepping on feet, Its not just here, I dont like stepping on anyones feet anywhere. I Try to be a nice guy and treat people the way I want to be treated. Doesnt always work in my favor, But I try.
 

no skid marks

Monkey
Jan 15, 2006
2,514
26
ACT Australia
It's the same lowers for the dual and the single crown fork(Marzocchi). So, if anything, the 888's would be cracking more lowers due to the flex your're saying an overbuilt singlecrown wouldn't have. Magnesium doesn't like flex. And then you would also be saying that the singlecrown is actually STRONGER than the dual.
And I think CK can handle it, he jumps in with enough stuff like that and USUALLY a ton of facts and numbers and other crap that no one wants to read that I'm actually surprised. Maybe even a little dissappointed in him!
Just the facts, ma'am...
Ii hadn't given it much thought,hence why I said possibly rather than stated it. But my idea was that the single is stiff for a short stanchion,so the flex is going into the brace. A 888 has longer stanchions(more travel,and tripples),and the tripples are bolt up,allowing(I speculate) more absorbtion of forces.
No one is saying single crowns are ****. This is a DH forum,DH in my mind means the most extreme,punishing typ of MTB,with drops,jumps,rocks,and bumps. A tripple clamp is a better fork than a single clamp for this purpose,accept for the fact you can hit your knees on them.This is why the pros run them. Yes you can get single crowns that are good,and better than some tripples.
The 888 Vs 66 is probably the best example as they have the closest features,but this still doesn't cater to facts that may not be addressed in this example. The 888 has more travel,so this destroys 90% of the debate. A same travel 888 as a 66 with the same lowers,should be stronger,stiffer,lighter,and lower.
Get whatever fork suits your needs best. I have single crowns on some of my bikes. The argument I put forward was talking about technical possibilities. The best DH fork ever made may turn out to be a single crown at some stage,a better tripple could be made is the point.
 

ChrisKring

Turbo Monkey
Jan 30, 2002
2,395
4
Grand Haven, MI
DirtyMike

I have a Pike on my Heckler. For trail riding and midwest DH it's great. I haven't had a problem with the fork.

If I lived in an area with more DH that needed to be pedalled up rather than shuttling, I would probably have a Nomad with a Totem or Lyrik fork. The SC fork is easier for tight turns and looks a little less moto for tooling around the block.

That said, a dual crown fork eliminates the bending moment on the steerer tube and puts the stress into nearly pure shear stress. The SC fork has bending stress on the steeerer tube. That is the reason for 1.5" head tubes. While 1.5" HT are a great solution, they should be heavier than a DC fork that has the same safety factor on breaking. Therefore, the engineering side of me decides to use a Boxxer for DH.

Just as a side note, MX bikes have 1" steerer tubes with up to 52mm fork legs and 13" of travel.
 

DirtEveryDay

Turbo Monkey
Nov 24, 2003
2,695
4
Pacific North Wet
"As far as stepping on feet, Its not just here, I dont like stepping on anyones feet anywhere. I Try to be a nice guy and treat people the way I want to be treated. Doesnt always work in my favor, But I try."


Well, I suppose the world's better cuz of people like you. I'm just bored and like to see how far people will go for no reason. Like Wikipedia's biggest investor up there! ;)
I think the DC forks became the standard because A: we all trashed a RS Judy at one time or another and it sucked. B: Because companies lacked the technology to produce a single crown fork of todays standards even 4-5 years ago. C: Cuz it fuggin looks cool and people love em and like to pretend they're motos.
I have seen trashed single crown forks. I have seen a LOT more trashed dual crown forks. Everything breaks. I have nose-cased a certain, crappy, uphill 30' gap twice, on both a 888 and a 66...and both are good. I DID check the 66 out much closer than I did the 888 afterwards...but for the same reason most people suspect the singlecrown...CONSPIRACY!
 

kuksul08

Monkey
Jun 4, 2007
240
0
For serious DH which includes hitting rock gardens at high speeds and very rough descents, a dual crown splits the torque from the fork in half, which means less stress on the steerer and stanchions.

Also wouldn't they be less likely to twist since the stanchions are gripped in two places?

IMO just relate serious downhilling to dirtbiking. All motorcycles have 'triple clamps' for a reason
 

sanjuro

Tube Smuggler
Sep 13, 2004
17,412
0
SF
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Statics



Do you understand the meaning of statics now?

Anyway, the reason why dirt jumpers can get away with a single crown for is that the moment arm of a short travel or rigid fork is much shorter than an 8" travel DH fork. Furthermore, they are typically smoother than a DH rider and therefore the forces are lower.

Here is some further reading:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Strength_of_materials
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moment_arm

While the above links will not give you a college education in engineering, it might help you understand the reason why some thing are the way they are. I am very frustrated with people assuming that everything in the bike industry is a big conspiracy as if the marketing department told the engineering department to invent new laws of physics to sell stuff. Well, maybe some companies do. :disgust1:
10 years ago there wasn't a 7 inch travel single crown fork.

Has Engineering or Physics changed much in 10 years?

I like your "some things are the way they are". Good thing Thomas Edison did not accept that premise. I would be sitting in the dark while I surfed the internet.

EDIT: I thought of the joke just now.
 

DirtEveryDay

Turbo Monkey
Nov 24, 2003
2,695
4
Pacific North Wet
For serious DH which includes hitting rock gardens at high speeds and very rough descents, a dual crown splits the torque from the fork in half, which means less stress on the steerer and stanchions.

Also wouldn't they be less likely to twist since the stanchions are gripped in two places?

IMO just relate serious downhilling to dirtbiking. All motorcycles have 'triple clamps' for a reason
OH! Actually, I HAVE twisted the stanchions on an 888 when I nosed a boulder and taco'd a wheel at the same time! I ordered the Risse crowns at that point out of fear and a little ignorance, but I knew it dropped the ride height too(and my static leverage ratio...:)), so win-win. No issues on the 66, but it IS a reason to be concerned. The stanchion/crown interface is the hot spot I'm worried about, not the steerer tube.
 
Dec 11, 2007
43
0
ive seen people doing just fine with long travel single crowns such as a totem! i would never go anything but DC but ive seen alot more people now ripping it with SC's. The thing is yeah the twisting in the rocks but whatever go for it if u want... the totem wont hold u back in the times it turns out.
 

no skid marks

Monkey
Jan 15, 2006
2,514
26
ACT Australia
please everyone,put all known forks aside and just look at the facts and theories. You can't do an experiment without the same factors,we do not have any examples with the same factors so there is no statistics that or experience from current forks that really support any argument completely.
Logic and facts,keep it too logic and facts.
Lets start a list of facts.
 

DirtyMike

Turbo Fluffer
Aug 8, 2005
14,239
826
My own world inside my head
DirtyMike

I have a Pike on my Heckler. For trail riding and midwest DH it's great. I haven't had a problem with the fork.

If I lived in an area with more DH that needed to be pedalled up rather than shuttling, I would probably have a Nomad with a Totem or Lyrik fork. The SC fork is easier for tight turns and looks a little less moto for tooling around the block.

That said, a dual crown fork eliminates the bending moment on the steerer tube and puts the stress into nearly pure shear stress. The SC fork has bending stress on the steeerer tube. That is the reason for 1.5" head tubes. While 1.5" HT are a great solution, they should be heavier than a DC fork that has the same safety factor on breaking. Therefore, the engineering side of me decides to use a Boxxer for DH.

Just as a side note, MX bikes have 1" steerer tubes with up to 52mm fork legs and 13" of travel.


Hmmm, So, instead of an extremly limited amount of flex at the steerer, you Opt to put the force directly into the head tube of the bike? Repeating here that I currently only have any real time on a Marzocchi SC fork, but ther steerers are Burly, and overbuilt. Like i said, dircetly comparing the 66 and 888, I cannot feel ANY difference in flex between the two. I do not have a 1.5 heattube either, I am running there standard 1 1/8 reinfoirced steerer.

I know I say this alot, But, With that said, I have broken Both a Boxxer team, and a Manitou Slider. Boxxer I broke the lowers, Slider I cracked the lower crown behind the Steer tube.



I plan on riding the living hell out of My 66 up at mammoth this summer, I have no worries at all.
 

DirtEveryDay

Turbo Monkey
Nov 24, 2003
2,695
4
Pacific North Wet
Hey, how'd that Boxxer Team feel compared to your 66? I can either order one of those along with my ED frame pretty cheap or I can demo a WC for the season. Even if I do think that the SC fork is easily adequate for 90% of the places I'll ride, there's that 10 % that I'll not be needing any other fear factors contributing to the ones already in place...
 

DirtEveryDay

Turbo Monkey
Nov 24, 2003
2,695
4
Pacific North Wet
And didn't the 1.5" FRAME arrive before a 1.5" fork ever existed? My understanding, or atleast my perception, was to allow for the use of zerostack headsets, reducing ride height.