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Sticky Sherman's at low SPV pressures?

Discussion in 'Downhill & Freeride' started by Tharkun, Aug 26, 2005.

  1. Tharkun

    Tharkun Monkey

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    Hi,

    I finally got around to playing with my Sherman Breakout fork yesterday. I figured I would set SPV really low for a super smooth ride, I don't mind some fork movement anyway. So I set it at about 35 psi, and tested it out. First I just applied the front brake and pushed down, when rebounding it seemed quite sticky and jerky, it extended quite poorly. So then I ride it around, it feels really smooth cutting through its travel, but there is definaly something wrong with the way it rebounds at low pressures. Do I just need to break it in? Is there a problem?

    Also, am I the only one who thinks that the rebound adjusters on forks don't make any difference? Someone please tell me if "more rebound damping" means faster or slower rebound, because honestly I can't tell the difference.

    When adjusting the hex nut, how far do you have to turn it to see some difference? I think I've heard stories of people completely removing the nut and spilling oil all over, but that could be a different fork.

    Thanks alot,
    Tharkun
     

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  2. gemini2k

    gemini2k Turbo Monkey

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    yeah i had one, sold it. It takes a little while to break in. But you definetley dont wanna run pressures that low. It'll make it top out real quick and feel funny over the big stuff. The only way to get better small bump response is to go get a tpc kit. More means more dampening, i.e. slower rebound. You should definetley see a huge difference when adjusting the rebound. The hex nut i wouldn't worry about too much, turn it in maybe one full turn at most.
    ________
    THE CIGAR BOSS
     
    #2 -   Aug 26, 2005
    Last edited: Apr 26, 2011