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thats this? fork pressing?!?! dang...

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hierophant5

Chimp
Oct 5, 2005
10
0
I just accquired a "Marzocchi junior t bomber" fork. This is my first suspension fork ever. The "stem" (the piece portruding from the fork mount of the frame ) is really long. I thought that perhaps it needs to be cut? Is this correct? Also I heard that I needed to get the fork press fitted onto the crown. Ok whatever that means. I'm sure it will come back to haunt me. I have also questions about fork tuneing. Is the junior t adjustable to any extent? I have a fox vanilla rear suspension. Is this a recomended shock? damn I hate not knowing these things......
Btw, any mountain bike clubs in Sacramento California? I'm feling like joining a collective such that I can get these questions and ailements resolved...
 

alexchannell

Chimp
Jul 23, 2005
64
0
I would really really suggest going down to your local bike store and watch them do it, not something you want to screw up. The vanilla is fine, (strong, reliable) but newer shocks have lots more features (5th element, fox dhx, manitou swinger)
 

Bldr_DH

Monkey
Aug 8, 2003
767
0
NO BO CO
Just for some terminology so you'll know for the future (words bolded for ease of use :)):

The stem is the horizontal (more or less) piece that attaches your handlebars to the fork.

The stem attaches to the fork at the steer tube. This is sometimes called a "steerer". When you asked about cutting the stem, you meant cutting the steerer and that's an easy operation, but don't simply take a hacksaw to it. You'll need the cut to be straight, so either use a pipe cutter, or take it to the LBS (local bike shop) to have it done.

The crown (crowns in your case) are the cross cross braces that attach your steerer to the legs of the fork. The lower crown is fixed to the steerer and the upper crown is there to add some rigidity to the whole setup.

To answer the "get the fork press fitted into the crown" question, I'm guessing this is probably referring to setting the headset race. That is a little ring that you slide down your steerer. At the bottom of the steerer, if you look it bulges out slightly at the very bottom, this is where the race must be pressed, or "set" onto. The race should be flush with the crown. This ring acts as a little track for the bearings in your headset. Like the guy above said, take it to a shop and watch them do the operation.

I know it seems rather complicated, but you'll get it in no time.
Oh, and welcome to the awesome world of biking.
 

zmtber

Turbo Monkey
Aug 13, 2005
2,437
0
i agree go down to you local shop, read mags, and ask in the begginer forum. Also try comparing tomother bikers bikes and ask more learned mtb that are in you area your question so they can visually teach you and explain everything better
 

PatBranch

Turbo Monkey
Sep 24, 2004
10,460
8
wine country
If you try it and screw it up, you will end up kicking your own ass.

Go to your local shop and have it done right. Some good advice I was given from others; when the shop works on your bike watch them and ask questions. ( :mumble: don't ask too many,hahaha).

zmtber, I had to read that at least 5 times to understand it. If you are going to give advice to someone; make it ledgible. It is pointless if they can't read it.
 

Monkeybidnezz

Turbo Monkey
Dec 16, 2003
1,213
0
Pac NW
A

The steerer tube is long, but make sure you don't cut it too short. If will come back to haunt you. It will be very costly to replace it so if anything keep it long.
 

hierophant5

Chimp
Oct 5, 2005
10
0
Bldr_Freerider said:
Just for some terminology so you'll know for the future (words bolded for ease of use :)):

The stem is the horizontal (more or less) piece that attaches your handlebars to the fork.

The stem attaches to the fork at the steer tube. This is sometimes called a "steerer". When you asked about cutting the stem, you meant cutting the steerer and that's an easy operation, but don't simply take a hacksaw to it. You'll need the cut to be straight, so either use a pipe cutter, or take it to the LBS (local bike shop) to have it done.

The crown (crowns in your case) are the cross cross braces that attach your steerer to the legs of the fork. The lower crown is fixed to the steerer and the upper crown is there to add some rigidity to the whole setup.

To answer the "get the fork press fitted into the crown" question, I'm guessing this is probably referring to setting the headset race. That is a little ring that you slide down your steerer. At the bottom of the steerer, if you look it bulges out slightly at the very bottom, this is where the race must be pressed, or "set" onto. The race should be flush with the crown. This ring acts as a little track for the bearings in your headset. Like the guy above said, take it to a shop and watch them do the operation.

I know it seems rather complicated, but you'll get it in no time.
Oh, and welcome to the awesome world of biking.
Thank you freerider, thank you all! Very helpful info. Ok so i guess i have to go to the shop. I'm guessing this isn't done free either. I hate student budgets. I'm going to try to press the race headset at home i dont think its too hard. then i think i will have the steerer cut professionaly. i aint risking it. Is the pressing process permanent? I havent looked through the detai too well but i dont want to screw it up...
 

arboc!

Turbo Monkey
Dec 18, 2004
3,294
0
spokane, WA
pressing a headset is nearly impossible if you dont have a headset press. it must be exact, or your headset will be worthless. you cant just wack it into place with a hammer
 

Bldr_DH

Monkey
Aug 8, 2003
767
0
NO BO CO
Yeah, I'd recommend having the race set by the shop as well. It's a super simple operation, so it won't end up costing much. My guess is $10, max.
 

allsk8sno

Turbo Monkey
Jun 6, 2002
1,158
33
Bellingham, WA
you can always ask the shop if you can "use their tools" during a really slow time and then explain that you don't know what your doing and have them help you, i have done this afew times, but then i know the shop and go there often...that or bring a sixer/soda and start chatting
 

hotcarl

Chimp
Feb 11, 2004
12
0
if you want to come down to davis, I show you how to do it. Our shop lones toolsout and I have free time to help a monkey.
 

hierophant5

Chimp
Oct 5, 2005
10
0
hmmm I went ahead and tried to press the race on the steerer before i got the chance to read any of these responses. Well I dont think its on wrong its straight its flush against the steerer's crown. I placed the racer on the steerer and slipped a pipe over the steerer to push the racer down into pace. I also used a 1" dowel on the opposite end of the steerer so that the impacts of me pressing the racer didnt disrupt the steerers placment on the crown. After a few seconds of pounding, the racer looks to be set firmly and flush against the middle crown of my fork. I wish I coud include pictures of this accomplishment. I'm content with my work but I would like an oppinion from a professional...
 

Bldr_DH

Monkey
Aug 8, 2003
767
0
NO BO CO
I'm by no means a professional, but if you were going to do it on your own, you did it exactly the way you should have. :thumb: I can't tell you how many people I know have tried to put it on with a screw driver and a hammer :nope:.
 

hierophant5

Chimp
Oct 5, 2005
10
0
Yeah I think its on right. I've never seen a racer pressed before but i imagine they have special presses or something. I went "ghetto status" with my pipe hammer and dowel trick...
 

zedro

Turbo Monkey
Sep 14, 2001
4,160
0
at the end of the longest line
dirtjumpP.1 said:
pressing a headset is nearly impossible if you dont have a headset press. it must be exact, or your headset will be worthless. you cant just wack it into place with a hammer
uhh....tell that to all my headsets (and just about anyones i know). Its not rocket science, although you can do damage if too ham-fisted. Assuming they are faced properly, they will sit as flat as any other method. Using a press doesnt garantee it'll go in straight anyways.
 

ioscope

Turbo Monkey
Jul 3, 2004
2,004
0
Vashon, WA
Yeah, I made a press with threadstock, washers and nuts.
It works beautiful, I fine tune with a hammer and a chunk of 2x4
 

TheInedibleHulk

Turbo Monkey
May 26, 2004
1,890
0
Colorado
allsk8sno said:
you can always ask the shop if you can "use their tools" during a really slow time and then explain that you don't know what your doing and have them help you, i have done this afew times, but then i know the shop and go there often...that or bring a sixer/soda and start chatting
As a five year bike shop rat, I wouldnt recommend the "use your tools" thing. It's pretty damn annoying, especially when you dont know what youre doing. Just pay to have it done and watch. The sixer is a capital idea however. If you are on a tight budget, I recommend finding a riding crew as quick as possible and learning how to do your own work. Dont, however, try to learn by experimentation. It will only cost you in destroyed parts and a janky bike.
 

chicodude

The Spooninator
Mar 28, 2004
1,057
1
Paradise
zedro said:
uhh....tell that to all my headsets (and just about anyones i know). Its not rocket science, although you can do damage if too ham-fisted. Assuming they are faced properly, they will sit as flat as any other method. Using a press doesnt garantee it'll go in straight anyways.

Mine too. It started with a hammer and a 2x4 and now has opgraded to a long bolt and nut, with lotsa washers.


He called my headsets worthless. Im going to cry now...
 

Zutroy

Turbo Monkey
Dec 9, 2004
2,445
0
Ventura,CA
dirtjumpP.1 said:
pressing a headset is nearly impossible if you dont have a headset press. it must be exact, or your headset will be worthless. you cant just wack it into place with a hammer

Actually you can....well at least with a rubber mallet.
 

peter6061

Turbo Monkey
Nov 19, 2001
1,577
0
Kenmore, WA
If you know what you're doing, a hammer and 2x4 work just fine.

However, I'd always prefer to use a press.

Have your shop do it the first time. It's money well spent, and as others have said, if you make a mistake and cut the steer tube too short, you'll be kicking yourself wishing you only had to spend the money to have it installed.

Welcome

edit: I'll take any 'worthless' Chris King headsets anyone has.
 

SD_TMTB

Chimp
Jun 26, 2005
92
0
Raleigh, NC
Bldr_DH said:
I'm by no means a professional, but if you were going to do it on your own, you did it exactly the way you should have. :thumb: I can't tell you how many people I know have tried to put it on with a screw driver and a hammer :nope:.
I do all my wrenching at my house or my friends house (who is a mech), and I always use a screw driver and a hammer/rubber mallet, as long as you don’t scratch it up.

Also for future reference if you need to take a headset out of your frame, just grind down a top cap on two sides just enough so that it will fit into your headtube and then just stick a seatpost or something in there and hammer it out. Saves money on an overly expensive tool, and works just fine.
 

DH biker

Turbo Monkey
Dec 12, 2004
1,186
0
North East
:D
dirtjumpP.1 said:
pressing a headset is nearly impossible if you dont have a headset press. it must be exact, or your headset will be worthless. you cant just wack it into place with a hammer
Hammer seems to work fine with me and my ChrisKing headset... anyway I know people who use the right tools and people like me who just use normal non bike shop tools and if you know what you are doing you can still get it on right.
Anyway --- any pictures of your new bike?
 

sanjuro

Tube Smuggler
Sep 13, 2004
17,411
0
SF
Bldr_DH said:
Just for some terminology so you'll know for the future (words bolded for ease of use :)):

The stem is the horizontal (more or less) piece that attaches your handlebars to the fork.

The stem attaches to the fork at the steer tube. This is sometimes called a "steerer". When you asked about cutting the stem, you meant cutting the steerer and that's an easy operation, but don't simply take a hacksaw to it. You'll need the cut to be straight, so either use a pipe cutter, or take it to the LBS (local bike shop) to have it done.

The crown (crowns in your case) are the cross cross braces that attach your steerer to the legs of the fork. The lower crown is fixed to the steerer and the upper crown is there to add some rigidity to the whole setup.

To answer the "get the fork press fitted into the crown" question, I'm guessing this is probably referring to setting the headset race. That is a little ring that you slide down your steerer. At the bottom of the steerer, if you look it bulges out slightly at the very bottom, this is where the race must be pressed, or "set" onto. The race should be flush with the crown. This ring acts as a little track for the bearings in your headset. Like the guy above said, take it to a shop and watch them do the operation.

I know it seems rather complicated, but you'll get it in no time.
Oh, and welcome to the awesome world of biking.
Great info except for the fork cutting instructions. I almost always use a hacksaw, although I use a special guide from Park to keep my cut straight. I also file down the cut section to smooth rough edges and to even the cut out.

Pipe cutters will work with lighter aluminum steerers, but the last time I tried using one on a reinforced steel steerer, it ate the cutting wheel. I suppose there are stronger cutting wheels, but this was the best I could find at the local hardware shop.
 

sanjuro

Tube Smuggler
Sep 13, 2004
17,411
0
SF
You could also just add a few spacers above your stem. This way, you won't have to cut the steerer. The last bike I bought had the steerer tube cut just right for one stem, but when I switched stems, it was too short.

Just make sure with the extra spacers, it is 2-3mm above the steerer so you can tighten the top cap properly.
 

zedro

Turbo Monkey
Sep 14, 2001
4,160
0
at the end of the longest line
sanjuro said:
Great info except for the fork cutting instructions. I almost always use a hacksaw, although I use a special guide from Park to keep my cut straight.
bah, the cut doesnt have to be perfectly straight, nothing should be actually contacting the top of the tube, and steerers are best to protrude from the stem with a spacer on top.