Wanted Thicker than usual MTB pedals (yes thicker, not thinner)

Discussion in 'Accessories: Miscellaneous' started by Santiago, Jan 19, 2018.

  1. Santiago

    Santiago Chimp

    Rep/Likes:
    1 / 2
    Joined:
    Jan 19, 2018
    Messages:
    7
    Category:
    Cross Country & Trail
    Price:
    1
    Size:
    27mm +
    Location:
    Pacific (AK, CA, HI, OR, WA)
    Hi everyone!

    Due to health issues (had cancer at age 12) I have a shorter leg (38mm shorter to be precise). PLEASE I NEED SOME ASSINSTANCE ON THIS PROBLEM: I'm looking for two kinds of MTB flat pedals

    a. some ultra thin like the MT ZERO form TIOGA (7mm)
    b some EVEN thicker than 27mm (like the STRAITLINE DEFACTO has).

    Finding thin pedals seems easy nowadays since its fashionable and trendy for downhill riders, but thick or super thick ones... is hard. They dont even show on google.
    PLEASE could you help me and tell me of any THICK PEDALS? (40mm or less)

    THANKS A BUNCH AND HOPE TO HEAR FORM YOU SOON

    SANTIAGO GARCIA
    ARGENTINA
     

    Please register to disable this ad.

  2. Kevin

    Kevin Turbo Monkey

    Rep/Likes:
    72 / 354
    Joined:
    Sep 6, 2004
    Messages:
    3,930
    Location:
    In Holland sticking my finger in a dike...
    Dont think Ive ever seen pedals that big... But how about welding or even just bolting some thin pedals onto both sides of a normal flat pedal?
    That should be in the 40mm range and last a good while Id think...
     
  3. Toshi

    Toshi Harbinger of Doom

    Rep/Likes:
    175 / 1,179
    Joined:
    Oct 23, 2001
    Messages:
    23,730
    Modify your shoe instead.
     
  4. Santiago

    Santiago Chimp

    Rep/Likes:
    1 / 2
    Joined:
    Jan 19, 2018
    Messages:
    7
    Well... modifying my shoes costs about 100 U$S each pair... and they don't last since they have to be rebuilt. Pedals last longer, and are cheaper.
    Note: rebuilt sports shoes have to be good to be modifyed... thus expensive. We are talking 200 bucks for shoes that wont last 8 months of mud and dirt.
    Thats the problem. But thanks for your idea, in theory is the way to go, but in practice the numbers dont add up
     
  5. Santiago

    Santiago Chimp

    Rep/Likes:
    1 / 2
    Joined:
    Jan 19, 2018
    Messages:
    7
    Welding sounds fine.
    What about those pins that come as grip in the pedal, could those be used to join two pedals using a drill and large screws for extra strenght?
     
  6. Kevin

    Kevin Turbo Monkey

    Rep/Likes:
    72 / 354
    Joined:
    Sep 6, 2004
    Messages:
    3,930
    Location:
    In Holland sticking my finger in a dike...
    If you could get the bolt holes to align im sure that could work pretty but finding pedals that match could prove difficult.
    Id probably try some burly ass bolts and a small metal plate or something to keep the pedals together.

    Id go for the toughest pedal in the middle and then sandwich it between two of these with the axles sawed off or something.



    Keep everything together with said bolt, plate and nut combo and I think it should probably hold up fine as long as youre not smashing them on gnarly downhill trails.

    Suerte Che!
     
  7. Santiago

    Santiago Chimp

    Rep/Likes:
    1 / 2
    Joined:
    Jan 19, 2018
    Messages:
    7
    Thanks!
    Will try see what happens. Now is all about finding the pedals whose holes match. Like cinderella pedals one could say. :D

    Muchas gracias mi amigo y suerte 4U as well!
     
  8. 4130biker

    4130biker PM me about Tantrum Cycles!

    Rep/Likes:
    62 / 435
    Joined:
    May 24, 2007
    Messages:
    3,911
    Location:
    Lizard Town
    You need a Primo Super Tenderizer:

    Through a quick google search it appears that they can still be found. After riding lots of these in my youth, I would probably drill and tap for longer screw pins for mountain biking. I believe they may have made a sealed bearing version, but most of them are loose ball with almost no sealing, so you’d want to solve that as well. Good luck!
     
  9. Santiago

    Santiago Chimp

    Rep/Likes:
    1 / 2
    Joined:
    Jan 19, 2018
    Messages:
    7
    You wont believe it! I was just looking at those when I saw your reply!
    Thanks! I even have an idea: seems they have a plastic counterpart that fits perfect since they are a plastic copy of the primos but with real metal pins. Could make a better sandwich pedal, lighter and cheaper with an alloy centre and plastic edges.
    What do you think?

    I also found these https://shop.odysseybmx.com/collections/odyssey-og-pc

    they have separate plates made of high tech stuff I dont get. Anyone has tried those for MTB? they are bmx but could do the trick.
     
    • Like Like x 2
  10. Adventurous

    Adventurous Starshine Bro

    Rep/Likes:
    168 / 1,469
    Joined:
    Mar 19, 2014
    Messages:
    3,677
    Location:
    Crawlorado
    Another solution could be shorter cranks. It would decrease your leverage a bit, but might feel less goofy than having extra tall pedals.
     
    • Useful Useful x 1
  11. rockofullr

    rockofullr confused

    Rep/Likes:
    100 / 604
    Joined:
    Jun 11, 2009
    Messages:
    6,682
    Location:
    East Bay, Cali
    I remember reading that after CG wrecked up his hip and leg one leg was a few cm shorter than the other and he would run two different length crank arms to compensate.
     
  12. Santiago

    Santiago Chimp

    Rep/Likes:
    1 / 2
    Joined:
    Jan 19, 2018
    Messages:
    7
    Sure! there are cracks available with a 165mm and the standard 175mm, some even longer at 180mm. Never seen longer or shorter.
    They seem a good choice, I'll buy some to try em out since they are cheap.
    But I see a problem in the ergonomics in theory that your friend might very well never experienced in practice...

    ... lets say that pedaling creates an imaginary circle on each revolution of the cranks, and cracks make a cross like shape when perfectly vertical or horizontal. One leg's circle might have a different diameter than the other, thus making the movement of the legs uneven: on the vertical axis thing are compensated and ballanced, but when the crank sits horizontally one legs gets 2 cm further away (or behind) than the other.
    Has your friend had any aches on the knees? Any problems with ballance when dealing roots or rocks standing in the pedals?

    according to my doctor a 7mm difference is tolerable, more might bring consequences in the long run.

    PS I'm happy to see you guys taking so much interest in this topic! Is great for me to see your ideas and sharing mine as well. Together we might find a better solution and, who knows, maybe help some other guys looking for answers later on.
     
  13. 4130biker

    4130biker PM me about Tantrum Cycles!

    Rep/Likes:
    62 / 435
    Joined:
    May 24, 2007
    Messages:
    3,911
    Location:
    Lizard Town
    I think the crank arm is a nice solution. Never tried, but I imagine you’d adapt to it as quickly as offset pedal heights, as long as you can avoid over-thinking it :)
     
  14. Santiago

    Santiago Chimp

    Rep/Likes:
    1 / 2
    Joined:
    Jan 19, 2018
    Messages:
    7
    LOL! yeah overthinking the problem seems like obsessive behavior doesn't it? :crazy:
    But there's is a reason: pedals and pedal parts are not as available here in Argentina. For instance all bike shops I've asked here only have the 175mm cranks, not shorter ones (they say is the standard and they don't bring or buy others). The local Odyssey retailer here says the JC/PC pedals are no longer in production, but didn't know of the new OGs existence... :bonk: A retailer that doesn't look at the catalog... uhmm.
    That's my problem. I guess in America customer service and options are better. Since my sister is travelling in march, I intend on buying there. Seems like the only way for now. Even if it makes me nuts in the process...