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This is what's right with The Industry®

Jm_

sled dog's bollocks
Jan 14, 2002
19,451
10,087
AK
Tubeless is going a hell of a lot better. There are still some crappy combos, but by and large a majority of us are riding without tubes and rarely flatting anymore. I like that.
 

Sandwich

Pig my fish!
Staff member
May 23, 2002
21,369
6,431
borcester rhymes
Steep seat angles (that are a good decade overdue), slacker head angles with corrected fork offsets, and integrated tool/cargo storage are about the only things going right with hardware trends in the industry.

Everything else is basically just complicating shit for no real reason. Suspension quality has stagnated in the last few years and not seen any meaningful improvements...but we have a million options, most of which are incompatible with each other in some way, and still have major performance and durability flaws.

Brakes haven't moved much either. Millions of options, all with their own special breed of bullshit.

Tires are still either way too flimsy or way too heavy necessitating homegrown Scooby Doo shit like all these inserts.

Frames, despite being made out of carbon fiber by processes with significant heritage and excessive profit margin behind them, are still being held steady industry-wide at prices that are just ridiculous.


This industry does not deserve a reach-around for doing anything right at all, just to be perfectly clear. This is like giving the class fuckup a cookie for not putting on his pants backwards one time while everyone else's progress is held back for him.
so just FYI but this is the "Right with the industry" thread, not wrong. There's a thread for that.

What's right-
STEEL SPOKES. I can get spokes in any length I want, in a couple of colors, and the threads will match, they are consistently pretty cheap, they are usually reusable, they can be bought in a bike store, they can be cut to size, they can be replaced easily. It's so wonderful. If my rim or hubs break, I can replace them. GTFO with one-piece proprietary shit.

Pedals. Up until I became a dentist, I had the same pair of SPD535s on every bike. They were replaced by whatever the latest XT version, which FIT IN THE SAME CRANKS HOLY SHIT

Chinese carbon rims. While the industry self-flaggelates with $900 carbon rims, the chinerds have been cranking out lightweight, stiff, and more disposable rims that offer 90% of the performance with 30% of the cost.

Tires. You can get almost any tread pattern on light, reinforced, or downhill sidewalls. That means I can run butchers on my XC bike to accelerate fast and still corner. I haven't had any problem with tubeless sealant on most of my tubeless compatible rims/tires. My HT, trail and DH bikes were all converted pretty easily

Problem solvers. I can't believe trek hasn't just bought this company and shut them down. I'll be running one of their shims to convert my $500 thomson dropper in my new frame which has an arbitrarily larger seatpost diameter.

Cranks. Somehow, almost every crank manufacturer has settled on 30mm diameter spindles. Shimano notwithstanding, as long as you get a BB that will fit a 30mm spindle, you should be OK. Whether that BB is BSA, BB30, BB92, or god knows what else, things are settling with 30mm.
 

jonKranked

Detective Dookie
Nov 10, 2005
86,805
25,349
media blackout
Problem solvers. I can't believe trek hasn't just bought this company and shut them down. I'll be running one of their shims to convert my $500 thomson dropper in my new frame which has an arbitrarily larger seatpost diameter.
bike shops would probably revolt.
 

kidwoo

Artisanal Tweet Curator
Cranks. Somehow, almost every crank manufacturer has settled on 30mm diameter spindles. Shimano notwithstanding, as long as you get a BB that will fit a 30mm spindle, you should be OK. Whether that BB is BSA, BB30, BB92, or god knows what else, things are settling with 30mm.

ha!

https://www.bikemag.com/gear/components/drivetrain/sram-introduces-dub-crank-bottom-bracket-technology/

DUB crank spindles have the intriguing diameter of 28.99


Agree on problem solvers. God bless those people.
 

captainspauldin

intrigued by a pole
May 14, 2007
1,263
177
Jersey Shore
I'd argue that Scott built it last year with the new Spark and Spark RC. I've been loving my RC with 5" dropper. Sure it flexes a little and you'd break something if you smash it too hard but it's so fast and fun on mellow to gnarlyish trails. I'm thinking about getting the 120mm Spark with a stiffer/stronger build to complement it.
Don't be weirded out by the remote fork lockout, it comes off.
Check out the Plus frame geo but run it with normal tires and a taller fork.
Interesting.. Just demo'd a Spark and thought it pedaled great but was hard to put it where you wanted it to go (it was the 29er version, so wonder if that's the reason). My Honzbro feels like a way better bike to ride on the mellow trails I was demoing the spark on. I love the idea of a short travel 29er with aggressive geo, but the honzo feels so damn good I'm not sure it's worth the extra $$$.
 

jonKranked

Detective Dookie
Nov 10, 2005
86,805
25,349
media blackout
a while back i picked up a spark from the last year it was made with 26" but haven't had a chance to build it up yet. it's also looking like i can toss an -2 angleset in it to get the HA down to 66.
 

slyfink

Turbo Monkey
Sep 16, 2008
9,575
5,353
Ottawa, Canada
so just FYI but this is the "Right with the industry" thread, not wrong. There's a thread for that.

What's right-
Tires. You can get almost any tread pattern on light, reinforced, or downhill sidewalls. That means I can run butchers on my XC bike to accelerate fast and still corner. I haven't had any problem with tubeless sealant on most of my tubeless compatible rims/tires. My HT, trail and DH bikes were all converted pretty easily
I just ordered a new tire from CRC. (DD Aggressor) decent tread pattern, with light(ish) reinforced sidewalls. close to 50% off MSRP, free delivery, they even had my cc# on file, so I just had to click once. so easy. :notbad:
 

Jm_

sled dog's bollocks
Jan 14, 2002
19,451
10,087
AK
so just FYI but this is the "Right with the industry" thread, not wrong. There's a thread for that.

What's right-
STEEL SPOKES. I can get spokes in any length I want, in a couple of colors, and the threads will match, they are consistently pretty cheap, they are usually reusable, they can be bought in a bike store, they can be cut to size, they can be replaced easily. It's so wonderful. If my rim or hubs break, I can replace them. GTFO with one-piece proprietary shit.

Pedals. Up until I became a dentist, I had the same pair of SPD535s on every bike. They were replaced by whatever the latest XT version, which FIT IN THE SAME CRANKS HOLY SHIT

Chinese carbon rims. While the industry self-flaggelates with $900 carbon rims, the chinerds have been cranking out lightweight, stiff, and more disposable rims that offer 90% of the performance with 30% of the cost.

Tires. You can get almost any tread pattern on light, reinforced, or downhill sidewalls. That means I can run butchers on my XC bike to accelerate fast and still corner. I haven't had any problem with tubeless sealant on most of my tubeless compatible rims/tires. My HT, trail and DH bikes were all converted pretty easily

Problem solvers. I can't believe trek hasn't just bought this company and shut them down. I'll be running one of their shims to convert my $500 thomson dropper in my new frame which has an arbitrarily larger seatpost diameter.

Cranks. Somehow, almost every crank manufacturer has settled on 30mm diameter spindles. Shimano notwithstanding, as long as you get a BB that will fit a 30mm spindle, you should be OK. Whether that BB is BSA, BB30, BB92, or god knows what else, things are settling with 30mm.
Steel spokes and standard wheel construction (no dipshit straight pull, spoke-hole-less rims, almunimum spokes) for the win. Still works. Have no desire to build or own dipshit wheels.
 

William42

fork ways
Jul 31, 2007
3,946
695
Say what you will about stupid standards, you can buy a reliable bike that weighs 5-6 lbs less than you could 10 years ago for the same purpose, it has better geometry, suspension, traction, and is more comfortable. We no longer have to look for cobbled together shit, and replace half the shit on our brand new bikes because it sucks. You don't have to spend 60 bucks on a new set of handlebars because the bike came stock with 680mm bars. You don't have to replace your wheels because the stock wheelset has 3 engagements and weighs half a ton. You don't have to replace an 80mm stem either. There's a whole lotta room for easy improvement visa vie "not doing stupid shit like stupid ass new unnecessary standards," but nevertheless bikes are pretty goddamn good these days. And they're pretty goddamn good from most companies. For most of their lineup.
 

Tantrum Cycles

Turbo Monkey
Jun 29, 2016
1,143
503
I get paid to ride my bike, so there's that.

But I'm REALLY OLD. Addy for the win.

I'm glad my bikes aren't carbon.
 

Jm_

sled dog's bollocks
Jan 14, 2002
19,451
10,087
AK
Just caught this on Pivot's Mach 6 FAQ:

How do I enduro with the Mach 6 Carbon?
#1 Purchase a blue Mach 6 Carbon. The stealth grey will work, but ideally your bike will match your Enduro kit. If your bike and kit do not match, you suck or at least everyone will think you suck.

#2 Document everything. Every ride, session, and race must be thoroughly recorded. Appropriate methods of documentation include Go Pros, Strava, and having your photographer/ videographer friend follow you around and make sick edits.

#3 Enduro-specific helmets and goggles are required at all times when descending. Be sure to bring your spare XC lid for climbing. As a special tip, FLY makes a sick full face that perfectly matches the new blue Mach 6 carbon. It’s even designed for goggles and will make your look as fast as Bernard even if you aren’t: http://www.flyracing.com/product/mtb/riderwear/helmets/werx-ultra-helmet/4926/blueredblack

#4 You must wear a minimum of three articles of Troy Lee Designs or FLY clothing at all times. If not, have fun on your cross country ride. Don’t mix your gear either. Running a FLY jersey, Troy Lee shorts and Race Face knee pads is just wrong (although we do it all the time – just not without criticism)

#5 Wear a fanny pack (Sorry…now it’s called a waist pack). These are cool again (in case you didn’t know).

#6 Be sure to get pro name decals with your state/ country flag so that you can easily identify your bike. (We do this so that our personal bikes don’t get loaned out at demo events. At least that’s how we rationalize it).

#7 Equip your bike with Enduro-specific components, including but not limited to stems, wheels, and grips. (Fortunately, these are all included in our awesome Pivot complete builds.)
http://www.pivotcycles.com/bike/mach-6-carbon/

Anyone who makes fun of Enduro™ is not completely reptilian.
 
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Jm_

sled dog's bollocks
Jan 14, 2002
19,451
10,087
AK
I thought more about it though and it's important to remember these are also the super-boost people.
 

slyfink

Turbo Monkey
Sep 16, 2008
9,575
5,353
Ottawa, Canada
quiet. bikes can be awesomely quiet nowadays. All raw race footage is a testament to that. But now I'm also blown away by how there's times when all I hear is the sound on my knobs crushing loam, or ripping a berm. so nice.
 

FlipSide

Turbo Monkey
Sep 24, 2001
1,407
858
quiet. bikes can be awesomely quiet nowadays. All raw race footage is a testament to that. But now I'm also blown away by how there's times when all I hear is the sound on my knobs crushing loam, or ripping a berm. so nice.
True! That's always what impresses me when I go at the MSA World Cup. In the years of the monocoque alu bikes (Intense, Foes, etc), it was incredible how noisy they were. Then came the cluch deraileurs, which did reduce the sounds quite a lot...but now with the foam tire inserts, it's really incredible how quiet they are.
 

Jm_

sled dog's bollocks
Jan 14, 2002
19,451
10,087
AK
Tubeless is right. Somehow got a puncture dead-center from a rock, more like a cut than a thorn, in Arkansas last week and stupid-me I forgot the tube in my hotel room. Sprayed a bunch, went down a lot, I walked the bike for a bit, filled it up a bit, walked a bit more, filled it up some more, and it was solid. Still rolling it. Not only that, it's my own home-made sealant, so something went right.
 

Jm_

sled dog's bollocks
Jan 14, 2002
19,451
10,087
AK
1 part auto slime (appears to have little bits of ground rubber in it)
1 part RV antifreeze
1 part latex mold builder (Michael's is always having some kind of 50% off or buy one get one free sale)
2 parts water.

I usually make it with 1 part water when I mix it for simplicity, and store it in mason jars, then thin it out a bit when I actually use it.
 
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