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Tips and Tricks

Arkayne

I come bearing GIFs
May 10, 2005
3,745
13
SoCal
i take it you're rather skilled at upgrading/replacing bearings & seals, then?
I didn't want to fluff up the post with details of how to properly blow off the bike with air. I'll go ahead and add that you should avoid using compressed air directly on bearings & seals unless you want to upgrade/replace them regularly. :)
 

dmilkman589

Chimp
Mar 5, 2008
62
0
ny
every one prolly already does this but when changing a tube dont bother to take the whole tire off just the one side and slip the tube out
 

boogenman

Turbo Monkey
Nov 3, 2004
3,424
120
BUFFALO
I find that tubes wrapped around frames looks real ghetto, collects water, grime mud ect ect, and does not always last a long time.

Find a place that sprays rhino liner or line-x and ask for the "scrap" or "overspray" that get sprayed on tothe back dropping or tarps. It peels right off the tarps in huge sheets.
1. Cut the sheets into the desired sized peice that you need. I usually keep the edges square at this time. So it looks like a long rectangle if it is being used for chainstay protection.
2. Clean the back side of the rhino liner with a clean paper towel and rubbing alcohol. Repeat thi sstep for the area of frame to be covered.
3. Use 3M double sided auto trim tape or double sided 3M outdoor tape to cover the rectangle of Rhino liner.
4. Trim the square edges off of the tape/rhino liner. Round them out real nice.
5. Pull backing off of tape and apply to frame.

I have been doing this for about 5 years now and have never had any fall off the bike or wear out. It looks real clean and lasts forever.

Here is a crappy pic:

 
Sep 11, 2007
5
0
novato
if u like running low tire pressure but have a problem w/ pinch flats try putting baby powder in ur tires i dont know why but it works, i run 15-20 psi and never pinch
 

sanjuro

Tube Smuggler
Sep 13, 2004
17,412
0
SF
This should be a thread of its own, but whenever you do a full tune-up, take the end caps off your housing and check if the outer plastic sheath has pulled back from the inner metal housing.

This is the main cause of ghost shifting. The fix is simple, trim the ends of your housing, but if the cable end is frayed, you will probably have to replace the cable.
 

mantispf2000

Turbo Monkey
Aug 9, 2001
1,728
183
Nevada, 2 hours from Mammoth
To get some tires to seat with Stans, I stretch a tube around the outside of the tire. This pushes the bead to the rim and forms a seal so the air can inflate the tire.

OK, so I'm a doofus for asking before actually going out and trying this. Would this also help with converting regular/non-tubeless tires to using Stan's? I've been trying to convert a set, did most of the ideas on the instructions, and still a no-go. Maybe I'm stoopud................
 

Damo

Short One Marshmallow
Sep 7, 2006
4,604
20
French Alps
Make sure to put your chain on the right way. Chains are directional and for perfect pedalling performance (or PPP in the industry), you need to follow the direct directional direction.
 

Wumpus

makes avatars better
Dec 25, 2003
8,164
154
Six Shooter Junction
Frame rub on older frame and fat tires: I cut a 1/2"x1" piece out of an aluminum can and ziptie it to the frame. You can slide it around to move the worn out section a few time before having to replace it. Keeps from wearing a hole in the chainstay.
 

slimshady

¡Mira, una ardilla!
Dec 20, 2007
2,709
771
La Plata, Argentina
Ever tried to deflate a pinched tube in the middle of the forest? when it's raining? Best solution is to take a valve cap, thread a small screw into its top, and make some holes in the cap wall, near the top. Screw it over the valve until the air comes out, and then start rolling the tube. It'll end like you've just taken it out of the box. I keep one of those in my CamelBack, and another at my garage.
 

conor

Monkey
Jan 19, 2009
340
0
Ireland
guys is there a 'parts needed to build a bike' thread or something similar? i am building my first bike and i'm not sure if i have everything

so far:

forks
frame
wheels
headset
stem
handlebars
brakes
seat post
seat clamp
seat
brake levers


i know i'm missing the drivetrain but i might use that from my old bike. am i missing anything major in regards to headset spacers etc? do i need those? thanks
 

Wumpus

makes avatars better
Dec 25, 2003
8,164
154
Six Shooter Junction
guys is there a 'parts needed to build a bike' thread or something similar? i am building my first bike and i'm not sure if i have everything

so far:

forks
frame
wheels
headset
stem
handlebars
brakes
seat post
seat clamp
seat
brake levers


i know i'm missing the drivetrain but i might use that from my old bike. am i missing anything major in regards to headset spacers etc? do i need those? thanks
A few headset spacers are always good to dial in the stem height before chopping the steerer tube.

Grease
TI prep for the BB?
New shifter cable/housing/ferrules/cable ends
if the brakes aren't hydraulic then brake cable/housing/ferrules/cable ends

Grips

Chain pin(or powerlink) if you have a Shimano chain
 

conor

Monkey
Jan 19, 2009
340
0
Ireland
ok cool i have grips aswell just didnt mention them and hopefully the crank etc will come off my old bike with a 9sp and new derailleur. will i need anything machine wise to put it together or will i be ok? will i need anything other than a hacksaw to cut my fork's steerer tube down to fit with my frame?

also do you reckon 145mm nixons will be ok on a 15" frame or will the geometry be off?


thanks for the reply and sorry to be asking so many q's but my other thread hasn't gotten a reply and i need to knwo soon as i will be buying in the sales.
 
Last edited:

Racebike

Monkey
Jul 28, 2008
463
4
Sweden
What about popping in just the one ball bearing in the bar, just take the endcap off and stick one in.

It will drive the "victim" to the final brink and beyond.
 

masnumata

Chimp
May 22, 2009
9
0
coke/pepsi etc. is a bicarbonate, you can use it to clean your battery terminals on your car as well. You can also mix baking soda and water to get the same result with less stickiness.
It's not a bicarbonate. Baking Soda and water would not give you the same thing as soda/coke.

Sodium Bicarbonate / Baking Soda = Slightly alkaline
Soda/coke = Carbonic Acid = Slighly acidic

Mas :(
 

bigjimmy

Chimp
Aug 23, 2009
23
0
cable/zip ties for everything. i always have a few in my car or riding bag.
great for emergency tube repairs just put on each side of the puncture, not ideal but it will get you home.
 

GuitarCrazyo

Chimp
Oct 24, 2009
6
0
If you are on em for a long time, padded fingerless cycling gloves help.
Also help for long hauls.

The other nice thing about the gloves is they soak up any sweat, so you dont slip a hand. It happened to me and sucked going down on pavement.
 

amuddog

Chimp
Nov 17, 2009
2
0
santa cruz
For a very clean install i use a hydraulic rear brake caliper shimano xtr or other on fork for a 7" rotor with no extra mount adapter. also provides a very straight low profile brake line.
 

abbike18

Chimp
Aug 23, 2009
30
0
getting non-lock on grips off:
take an old spoke, and shove it down between the grip and the h-bar. then pour a little isopropyl alcohol gown the gap between the grip and handlebars that form on either side of the spoke. grab the grip, and rotate it around the bar to spread the alcohol around. then it should slide right off.

getting non-lock on grips back on:
take the grip and put one end of it flat against the palm of your hand, to effectively form a long and tall cup. pour a little isopropyl alcohol into the other end of the grip and shake it around to coat the inside of the grip withe the alcohol. slide the grip on and wait a little while for the alcohol to evaporate and the grip will stick. DO NOT use WD-40 as was suggested earlier. your grips will turn into MX throttles.

if the inside of your allen bolts are rusting (or proactively to keep them from rusting), smear some oil in the head when your all done tightening. this will displace the water and keep rust out.

use a magnetized screwdriver to drop ball bearings on to pre-greased bearing cups. no more balls dropped through your hubs or head tubes (but who uses loose bearing anymore?)

just install a new cable but don't have any end caps to keep it from fraying? an old spoke nipple will work

too cheap to buy new bushings for your drop seatpost (speedball, joplin, etc.)? wrap some PTFE tape around the non-friction side (inside of bottom bushing, outside of top bushing) of each bushing to tighten it up a little. experiment with number of wraps and tightness.
 

hmcleay

i-track suspension
Apr 28, 2008
116
104
Adelaide, Australia
1. Strap a vibrator to your brake line/lever/caliper when bleeding your brakes to help free any stubborn air bubbles.

2. Remove vibrator before going riding...
 

Damo

Short One Marshmallow
Sep 7, 2006
4,604
20
French Alps
You're kidding right?
Mas :(
Not at all.

Another one many people are misinformed about is the correct spring orientation on a rear shock's spring. The number of times I have noticed an upside down spring on the back of a bike. Once corrected, the ride is noticeably better.

Go check yours now. There should be a small marking on the spring denoting the orientation.
 

Bicyclist

Turbo Monkey
Apr 4, 2004
10,158
1
SB
getting non-lock on grips off:
take an old spoke, and shove it down between the grip and the h-bar. then pour a little isopropyl alcohol gown the gap between the grip and handlebars that form on either side of the spoke. grab the grip, and rotate it around the bar to spread the alcohol around. then it should slide right off.

getting non-lock on grips back on:
take the grip and put one end of it flat against the palm of your hand, to effectively form a long and tall cup. pour a little isopropyl alcohol into the other end of the grip and shake it around to coat the inside of the grip withe the alcohol. slide the grip on and wait a little while for the alcohol to evaporate and the grip will stick. DO NOT use WD-40 as was suggested earlier. your grips will turn into MX throttles.
Brotip: Something like Clean Streak (or any spray can of solvent) makes grip install and removal way easier, you just spray the stuff in the grip rather than try to pour alcohol into it.
 

crohnsy

Monkey
Oct 2, 2009
343
0
T Bay
Brotip: Something like Clean Streak (or any spray can of solvent) makes grip install and removal way easier, you just spray the stuff in the grip rather than try to pour alcohol into it.
Protip: Air compressor with spray nozzle. way better than solvents. :thumb:

Just to clarify since Damo forgot his e-sarcasm icons. Not sure if Mas is still checking to make sure

Dura Ace 10 spd CN-7900 ARE directional. I have not come across another chain that is. Well halflink chains too
 

nelsonjm

Monkey
Feb 16, 2007
710
1
Columbia, MD
Installing a fork crown race on your own? Try putting the fork in the freezer (sans suspension parts) and putting the race in a toaster oven to make the job easier.

If it doesn't fall into place, you can use a 2ft long piece of 1-1/2" pvc tubing.. or something similarly size that will let you tap the piece into place, but won't rest on the race surface. You should be able to pick that up for under 5$ at the hardware store.
 

kazlx

Patches O'Houlihan
Aug 7, 2006
6,682
1,517
Tustin, CA
Mastic tape works awesome for protecting chainstays. It is durable and easy to apply and sticks to itself. Wrap it like you would a bike tube, but it adheres to itself and turns in to a solid piece.

 

NickyBarns

Chimp
Aug 15, 2010
1
0
To get some tires to seat with Stans, I stretch a tube around the outside of the tire. This pushes the bead to the rim and forms a seal so the air can inflate the tire.

I grease each and every screw, bolt and nut I put on any of my bikes.
 

rekoner

Chimp
Jun 15, 2009
32
0
SE Virginia
When changing out your pedals, just hold your wrench to the pedal after you break it loose and spin your cranks to remove it or install.
 

Jim Mac

MAKE ENDURO GREAT AGAIN
May 21, 2004
6,364
281
the middle east of NY
I have personally found that you can usually straighten Avid discs by hand if it's only a slight bend. Just find the bend via checking where it rubs on the caliper/pad and use slight pressure to rebend by hand. Go little by little- more is less in this case. You can also use your other hand as a stabilizer, depending on the bend. I usually cover the disc with a clean rag or a paper towel just to ensure that I don't get grease, etc on the disc.
 

Joyride

Chimp
Jan 2, 2011
7
0
Boise, Idaho
I wear safety glasses as well as latex gloves when working with brake fluids and folk oils. I've squirted myself in the eye when least expecting it and it isn't pleasant. Oil can come at you pretty quick when releasing the air from fork air springs.

I always wash my bike before I work on it to keep my shop and myself cleaner. Makes life much easier.

If you get a new bike, just got your bike out of the shop, or just worked on your bike, check all your bolts. You can never be to sure and can save yourself a painful disaster. I start at one end of the bike and work my way to the other end. It only takes a couple minutes and can help you find other types of problems with your ride.
 

$tinkle

Expert on blowing
Feb 12, 2003
14,591
5
non-stick surface of your 3 qt saute pan failing you? don't throw it out: it makes for a great parts bath