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Toke up, hippies!

cannondalejunky

ease dropper
Jun 19, 2005
2,928
1
Arkansas
And I don't think it will bring in the amount of money some people say it will. If it's legalized prices are going to drop like a stone. Prices have already gone down due to the MMJ pot shops here in So Cal. What was once 60 an eighth is now 45.00 and it's going lower.
That's nuts if anything prices have been going up around here...if you don't get it from a hippie then you'll likely be paying $20/g no matter what
 

dante

Unabomber
Feb 13, 2004
8,814
9
looking for classic NE singletrack
And I don't think it will bring in the amount of money some people say it will. If it's legalized prices are going to drop like a stone. Prices have already gone down due to the MMJ pot shops here in So Cal. What was once 60 an eighth is now 45.00 and it's going lower.
I'd bet that the quantity would make up for a drop in prices, though. For all the diehards willing to go through getting a prescription now think about the masses that would just pick up a little something for the evening on their way home.
 

Ciaran

Fear my banana
Apr 5, 2004
9,844
11
So Cal
That's nuts if anything prices have been going up around here...if you don't get it from a hippie then you'll likely be paying $20/g no matter what
The best price I have found locally for good stuff is 11.00 per gram on special. 2g's for 25 seems to be the new standard whiich is 12.50 per g.

However, the really really good stuff is still only found at my friends' houses. :D

And man, that PCP comment brough back bad memories for me too. I only tried it once, but that was more than enough.
$45 is still more than a case of beer, though. Talk to me when it's by the OZ in bulk at the grocery store.
Fine wine and good spirits cost way more than a case of beer, too. I prefer to liken fine cannabis to a fine wine or really good scotch. Those can easily run in the hundreds of dollars for a bottle.

There is a lot more to producing great pot than just growing a healthy plant.
 
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sanjuro

Tube Smuggler
Sep 13, 2004
17,411
0
SF
Marijuana Said to Trigger Heart Attacks

These findings come from a study of 3,882 people who survived heart attacks. It was conducted at a number of centers around the country, including Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston, where Mittleman works. In the study, 124 people reported using marijuana regularly. Of these, 37 people said they used it within 24 hours of their heart attacks. Nine said they smoked it within an hour of their attacks.
That's science!
 

jimmydean

The Official Meat of Ridemonkey
Sep 10, 2001
30,703
3,718
Portland, OR
I bet the ones who had smoked within an hour of the heart attack had a better experience than those who had not smoked. :rofl:
 

binary visions

The voice of reason
Jun 13, 2002
21,695
498
NC
Also of the 3,882 people who survived heart attacks, it was discovered that 214 of them liked playing with their balls while they masturbate. Of those, 62 said they had played with their balls within 24 hours of their heart attacks, with a shocking 19 saying they had done so within an hour of their cardiac event.

You heard it here first, folks: playing with your 'sack causes myocardial infarctions.
 

dante

Unabomber
Feb 13, 2004
8,814
9
looking for classic NE singletrack
Also of the 3,882 people who survived heart attacks, it was discovered that 214 of them liked playing with their balls while they masturbate. Of those, 62 said they had played with their balls within 24 hours of their heart attacks, with a shocking 19 saying they had done so within an hour of their cardiac event.

You heard it here first, folks: playing with your 'sack causes myocardial infarctions.
#correlationdoesnotprovecausality

My guess is that the link between heart attacks and coffee are far, far, FAR higher.
 

jimmydean

The Official Meat of Ridemonkey
Sep 10, 2001
30,703
3,718
Portland, OR
There is talk of a conspiracy to keep it illegal in Oregon, but make it legal in Washington because that would keep the price of Oregon grown smoke at a premium. As long as you can get it out of Oregon, you are home free. :panic:
 
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Westy

the teste
Nov 22, 2002
38,171
4,963
Sleazattle
I voted for gay marijuana marriages in Wa. They were separate ballots but I wrote in that all marriages had to be gay and really ****ing high.
 

$tinkle

Expert on blowing
Feb 12, 2003
14,591
5
listening to Air (Playground Love), and this pic of kitteh in catnip is tumbled:



it's all in the timing
 

Westy

the teste
Nov 22, 2002
38,171
4,963
Sleazattle
I have friends in Colorado who are now all pissy that the government will now be regulating their weed.
 

wiscodh

Monkey
Jun 21, 2007
815
94
303
There was talk of a group from Washington that was working to get the OR ballot defeated in order to control Southern Oregon premium grow prices. :tinfoil:
yeah i heard that too. something like the whole citys income is based around it. If the measure was better worded/thought out like the WA bill, i think it would have passed here. It is only a short drive on the 205 to vancouver ( unless its friday after work)
 

jimmydean

The Official Meat of Ridemonkey
Sep 10, 2001
30,703
3,718
Portland, OR
yeah i heard that too. something like the whole citys income is based around it. If the measure was better worded/thought out like the WA bill, i think it would have passed here. It is only a short drive on the 205 to vancouver ( unless its friday after work)
:stupid:

The OR measure was pretty broad and there was a fear everyone would convert their lawn and yard into a crop. :rofl:
 

Pesqueeb

bicycle in airplane hangar
Feb 2, 2007
30,055
5,514
Riding the baggage carousel.
Pot CPAC's

Campaigns to legalize marijuana for recreational use in Colorado and Washington were well-financed and gave states regulatory and taxing power over it, both changes from a failed attempt in California two years earlier.
The first successful U.S. measures grew out of California’s Proposition 19 in 2010, which attracted donations of $4 million, according to campaign finance records. By contrast, the two states, which combined have one-third California’s population, raised at least $7.7 million.
“I’m sure they learned from the California experience,” said Beau Kilmer, co-director of the Rand Drug Policy Research Center in Santa Monica, California. “There was serious money behind the Washington and Colorado initiatives.”
Regulating the drug through such means as licensing and taxes may also benefit state governments strained by soaring costs for labor, including pensions and retiree health benefits, while sales- and property-tax revenue plunged after the longest recession since the 1930s.
The two measures also drew on support from younger voters, who are more likely to go to the polls in a presidential election, and growing tolerance for marijuana in a nation where one-third of states already permit its use for medical purposes.
Voters of all ages are moving toward supporting marijuana legalization, said Mark Kleiman, a public policy professor at the University of California, Los Angeles.
Out of Closet
“People know more people who smoke marijuana,” Kleiman said. “It’s a little bit like gay rights issues where, as people come out of the closet, the fear tended to go away.”
Washington will allow those at least 21 years old to buy as much as one ounce (28.3 grams) of marijuana from a licensed retailer. The measure directs the state liquor control board to regulate marijuana and tax its sales at a rate of 25 percent.
The board has until Dec. 1, 2013, to set rules on marijuana advertising, licensing producers, processors and retailers, and limiting the number of retail outlets allowed in each county.
Colorado, where the National Marijuana Business Conference begins today, allowed possession and purchase of as much as one ounce by those 21 and older, along with permission to grow as many as six plants in private, secure areas.
The new law directs Colorado’s revenue department to adopt regulations by July 1, 2013, on procedures for issuing a marijuana business license, labeling requirements for marijuana products, restrictions on advertising and civil penalties for not complying with the rules.
A similar measure failed in Oregon. Arkansas voters refused to legalize the medical use of marijuana, while Massachusetts voters approved such a measure, adding to the 17 states and District of Columbia that already allow it.
Laws Enforced
The Justice Department yesterday affirmed its intent to enforce federal drug laws, in spite of state legalization.
“The department’s enforcement of the Controlled Substances Act remains unchanged,” according to a statement provided by Nanda Chitre, a department spokeswoman. “Congress determined that marijuana is a Schedule I controlled substance. We are reviewing the ballot initiatives and have no additional comment at this time.”
Federal officials have previously cracked down on medical- marijuana dispensaries near schools in Colorado and sent letters to clinic landlords in California threatening them with jail if they didn’t evict the shops.
“What the states have done is perfectly constitutional,” said Robert Mikos, a law professor at Vanderbilt University in Nashville. “All they’ve done in essence is legalize the possession, cultivation and distribution of marijuana under state law.”
Resources Lacking
If the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration wants to prosecute cases in Washington and Colorado, “nothing is going to stop them,” Mikos said. “But as a practical matter, the federal government doesn’t have the resources to enforce the federal ban that rigorously.”
Private support bolstered the wins in Colorado and Washington, said Jonathan Caulkins, an operations research professor at Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.
“Colorado and Washington got a lot of money,” Caulkins said. “They got a small number of very rich people to write very, very big checks. There was no big funding of any opposition.”
New Approach Washington, the group supporting the ballot measure, raised $6.2 million, compared with $16,195 raised by opponents, according to data from the state’s Public Disclosure Commission.
Big Donors
Top donors include Progressive Corp. (PGR) Chairman Peter B. Lewis, who gave $2 million. Another $1.7 million came from Drug Policy Action, the political arm of the New York-based Drug Policy Alliance whose donors include billionaire investor George Soros.
“I have funded much of the movement to enact laws that give patients access to marijuana as relief for pain and nausea -- and have made no secret of being one of those patients myself, using marijuana to help with pain following the amputation of my lower leg,” Lewis wrote in an August letter to Bill Gates, chairman of Microsoft Corp. (MSFT), and Warren Buffett, chairman of Berkshire Hathaway Inc. (BRK/A), in joining their Giving Pledge campaign to get billionaires to pledge at least half their wealth to charity.
In Oregon, where a measure to legalize recreational marijuana use failed, supporters raised $67,149, according to data from the secretary of state.
Organized Supporters
In Colorado, the Campaign to Regulate Marijuana Like Alcohol received $1.5 million, according to data from the secretary of state. The Marijuana Policy Project was the largest contributor with $871,372, according to the data. Lewis gave $33,700 and the Drug Policy Alliance gave $100,000.
The Coalition to End Marijuana Prohibition secured another $511,414 in contributions, according to Colorado data.
“When states start adopting policies that work, other states take notice,” said Mason Tvert, co-director of the Denver-based Campaign to Regulate Marijuana Like Alcohol, which supported Amendment 64. “It would not come as a surprise if other states opted to follow its example for years to come.”
http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2012-11-08/legal-pot-in-colorado-washington-won-with-7-7-million.html
 

Pesqueeb

bicycle in airplane hangar
Feb 2, 2007
30,055
5,514
Riding the baggage carousel.
What change looks like.

King and Pierce County prosecutors are dismissing more than 220 misdemeanor marijuana cases in response to Tuesday’s vote to decriminalize small amounts of pot.

In King County, 175 cases are being dismissed involving people 21 and older and possession of one ounce or less. I-502 makes one ounce of marijuana legal on Dec. 6, but King County Prosecutor Dan Satterberg decided to apply I-502 retroactively.

“Although the effective date of I-502 is not until December 6, there is no point in continuing to seek criminal penalties for conduct that will be legal next month,” Satterberg said in a statement.

The dismissed cases involved arrests in unincorporated King County, as well as the state highways and the University of Washington. About 40 of the cases had already been filed in court as criminal charges; those charges will be dismissed. Another 135 cases were pending charging decisions and will simply be returned to the arresting police agency.

Pierce County Prosecutor Mark Lindquist said he was dismissing “about four dozen” pending cases where misdemeanor marijuana was the only offense. He said his staff was continuing to prosecute other cases where possession was secondary to a more serious charge, such as drunken driving.

“The people have spoken through this initiative,” said Lindquist. “And as a practical matter, I don’t think you could sell a simple marijuana case to a jury after this initiative passed.”

In an interview, Satterberg said his office would continue to prosecute marijuana possession above one ounce, allowing for “a buffer for those whose scales are less than accurate.” His office also charges felony possession — for people with more than 40 grams — although he said his staff routinely allows those defendants to plead down to a misdemeanor.

“I think when the people voted to change the policy, they weren’t focused on when the effective date of the new policy would be. They spoke loudly and clearly that we should not treat small amounts of marijuana as an offense,” he said.
I-502 campaign manager Alison Holcomb said she was “incredibly moved” by Satterberg’s announcement, which she said showed “incredible courage.”

The decision supports a prime argument I-502 made during the campaign. A study by a group of academics found there had been 241,000 misdemeanor marijuana possession cases in Washington over the past 25 years, 67,000 of them in the past five years. “If 502 hadn’t passed, we’d see the same amount of marijuana possession cases every year,” she said. “What makes a difference is changing the law.”
Satterberg is the first prosecutor to change charging policy after I-502, but other prosecutors are also considering these cases. Tom McBride of the Washington Association of Prosecuting Attorneys said his office “just starting to work through those issues.”

Seattle City Attorney Pete Holmes has refused to prosecute misdemeanor possession cases since he took office.

Earlier this week, the chief criminal deputy prosecutor in Spokane County, Jack Driscoll, appeared to take a more conservative position. He told the Spokesman-Review that, even after Dec. 6, the only marijuana which was legal to possess was pot sold in the state-licensed stores called for in I-502. Those stores won’t be created for at least a year.

“The only thing that is legal is selling marijuana through those stores,” Driscoll said. “That will be regulated by the state. You can’t under this initiative have an ounce of marijuana that doesn’t come from a state-issued provider. You still can’t have black-market marijuana.”

Holcomb disputed that interpretation. So did Satterberg, who called it a “very narrow reading” of the initiative. “I don’t know how you trace where (the marijuana) comes from,” he said.
Satterberg said he expected federal authorities to seek an injunction to block implementation of I-502′s state licensing scheme for marijuana retailers and growers. “I think it’s the kind of issue the U.S. Supreme Court will have a final word on,” said Satterberg, calling it an “an important state’s rights issue.”
But he does not expect a federal lawsuit to target the types of cases he is dismissing, noting that states already have widely divergent penalties for marijuana possession.
http://blogs.seattletimes.com/politicsnorthwest/2012/11/09/175-marijuana-prosecutions-in-king-county-dismissed-because-of-initiative-502/
 

Westy

the teste
Nov 22, 2002
38,171
4,963
Sleazattle
Walked by the corner inhabited by the local weed dealers. They all seemed a little depressed, like a bunch of steelworkers who have been given notice that plant is shutting down. Obama gets elected and the working man gets screwed.