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Tool Nerds, Questions and Tool Snobbery

HardtailHack

used an iron once
Jan 20, 2009
2,588
430
@toodles You are an electrical person, what sort of multimeter do you use and will it beep if it registers a DC voltage?
My new one doesn't and it sucks!
 

toodles

Turbo Monkey
Aug 24, 2004
3,035
1,391
Australia
@toodles You are an electrical person, what sort of multimeter do you use and will it beep if it registers a DC voltage?
My new one doesn't and it sucks!
I've got all Fluke gear now. The general use multi is a 117 which has auto-voltage (ac/dc) for unknown stuff.

For instrumentation stuff I've got a 179, 771 process 4-20mA clamp and a fucken awesome little Kyoritsu tong 2300R (tiny and does AC/DC tong testing).

Dunno about audible beep tho. What are you using?
 

HardtailHack

used an iron once
Jan 20, 2009
2,588
430
I've got all Fluke gear now. The general use multi is a 117 which has auto-voltage (ac/dc) for unknown stuff.

For instrumentation stuff I've got a 179, 771 process 4-20mA clamp and a fucken awesome little Kyoritsu tong 2300R (tiny and does AC/DC tong testing).

Dunno about audible beep tho. What are you using?
Yeah my old man is a Fluke guy but I have a habit of leaving stuff on site and people know the big yellow is worth big money so a weird name that people don't know is mote likely to end up back in my hands, hahaha!

Multimeters are Hioki DT4252, and DT4281, the cheaper 4252 will beep when it registers a voltage but the 4281 won't, working in cramped engine bays trying to probe through silicone seals the audible beep is awesome as you often can't see the display, they also swapped the DC and AC selector locations on the two meters which is quite annoying.
Neither meter will do what some(all?) Flukes do and allow you to display both a max and min voltage recorded, and that is awesome for a quick battery test. My amp clamp will do it but I think it has to be doing current and voltage at the same time, does logging which is handy.
Screenshot_20201009-192753.png

Odd that you mention the Kyoritsu, I bought a 2010 yesterday, nobody else made anything that suit my wants as well, it is supposedly super accurate and goes to 20A, it looks like it's straight outta the 80's.
 

toodles

Turbo Monkey
Aug 24, 2004
3,035
1,391
Australia
Yeah my old man is a Fluke guy but I have a habit of leaving stuff on site and people know the big yellow is worth big money so a weird name that people don't know is mote likely to end up back in my hands, hahaha!

Odd that you mention the Kyoritsu, I bought a 2010 yesterday, nobody else made anything that suit my wants as well, it is supposedly super accurate and goes to 20A, it looks like it's straight outta the 80's.
Its a bit of a wank at first but the Fluke 233 has a detachable screen which comes in real handy for placing in line of sight sometimes. One guy at the last job had one and we used the detachable screen way more than you'd think.

The Kyoritsu stuff is good quality - I'd run their gear no worries. I'm stoked on the mini tong, especially in cabinets that are a complete clusterfuck. The low key appearance makes it less likely to end up missing as well. The yellow Fluke cases actually come off to make them look boring and grey which is convenient if you're working around sticky fingered types. I've got a shitty old CABAC multi in the ute which i basically just keep to lend out if someone needs one (although it registers high frequency than my Flukes! - I needed 400Hz for an aircraft power supply recently and the Fluke topped out at 200Hz).
 

Leafy

Chimp
Sep 13, 2019
61
40
I like the fluke 27/FM so much I bought a second one to keep in the house and leave one the in garage. Its big, its heavy, but they're cheap as fuck, have all through hole components, thicker than standard 27 cases, and hardened against EMP attack.
 

HardtailHack

used an iron once
Jan 20, 2009
2,588
430
Its a bit of a wank at first but the Fluke 233 has a detachable screen which comes in real handy for placing in line of sight sometimes. One guy at the last job had one and we used the detachable screen way more than you'd think.

The Kyoritsu stuff is good quality - I'd run their gear no worries. I'm stoked on the mini tong, especially in cabinets that are a complete clusterfuck. The low key appearance makes it less likely to end up missing as well. The yellow Fluke cases actually come off to make them look boring and grey which is convenient if you're working around sticky fingered types. I've got a shitty old CABAC multi in the ute which i basically just keep to lend out if someone needs one (although it registers high frequency than my Flukes! - I needed 400Hz for an aircraft power supply recently and the Fluke topped out at 200Hz).
I did see the remote screen, long leads and a magnetic strap are good enough for me.
I'm half tempted to get one of these and just taking the cheaper meter for the things the Maestro won't do.
The elec box is growing too quickly, hahaha!
1602405500980.png
 
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ebarker9

Monkey
Oct 2, 2007
496
20
For the tool super snobs.

That does look ideal for removing fork seals.

As a side tool snob question, what are people's favorites for grease and method of application? I'm still in the dark ages using a normal tube of Park PolyLube (no complaints) and then smearing on with my finger. Not sure if switching mostly to a grease gun or one of the "grease pot" type setups with a brush would be better.
 

Adventurous

Starshine Bro
Mar 19, 2014
5,397
2,835
Crawlorado
That does look ideal for removing fork seals.

As a side tool snob question, what are people's favorites for grease and method of application? I'm still in the dark ages using a normal tube of Park PolyLube (no complaints) and then smearing on with my finger. Not sure if switching mostly to a grease gun or one of the "grease pot" type setups with a brush would be better.
Just got this guy, and initial review is that its the bomb. No cartridge, just a reservoir you can stuff full of your favorite grease and neatly dispense. Same thing as the gun Park Tools offers, just not blue.

101.jpg


 

OGRipper

back alley ripper
Feb 3, 2004
9,951
376
NORCAL is the hizzle
Those grease guns are great. I recommend finding one with a longer tip. :brows:

I also use the grease pot/brush approach for certain applications, so the short answer for me is both.

As for the grease itself, I've been using Phil Wood waterproof grease for about a million years and see no reason to change, but the Park stuff seems fine too.
 

6thElement

Schrodinger's Immigrant
Jul 29, 2008
6,493
3,765
I think I've got about 5 different greases...
  • Park tube, used for pedal threads, seat posts etc
  • Slick honey, finger application for suspension
  • P600 red stuff, SRAM coil boxxer stuff
  • super lube tube with grease gun head, used for turner zerks
  • old manitou sticky stuff which turner used to recommend before super lube
 

canadmos

Cake Tease
May 29, 2011
11,779
8,178
Canaderp
Those grease guns are great. I recommend finding one with a longer tip. :brows:

I also use the grease pot/brush approach for certain applications, so the short answer for me is both.

As for the grease itself, I've been using Phil Wood waterproof grease for about a million years and see no reason to change, but the Park stuff seems fine too.
I have Phil's grease, but I find it turns black and nasty sometimes.

I picked up some sort of farm equipment grease that is red and it has been awesome. Its super sticky and it doesn't wash away at all.

It just smells rank.
 

HardtailHack

used an iron once
Jan 20, 2009
2,588
430
I think I've got about 5 different greases...
  • Park tube, used for pedal threads, seat posts etc
  • Slick honey, finger application for suspension
  • P600 red stuff, SRAM coil boxxer stuff
  • super lube tube with grease gun head, used for turner zerks
  • old manitou sticky stuff which turner used to recommend before super lube
I just use Slickoleum for everything now because I know at some point I will drop the tub and end up with another Slicko blob on the concrete.

At least the new tub is better than the old margarine type container, still, I'd like a threaded lid.


The specs on Slickoleum are properly impressive too, I assumed it was all lizard industry BS but there is a proper test sheet avaliable for the stuff.
 

canadmos

Cake Tease
May 29, 2011
11,779
8,178
Canaderp
I just use Slickoleum for everything now because I know at some point I will drop the tub and end up with another Slicko blob on the concrete.

At least the new tub is better than the old margarine type container, still, I'd like a threaded lid.


The specs on Slickoleum are properly impressive too, I assumed it was all lizard industry BS but there is a proper test sheet avaliable for the stuff.
Used to use this for everything too, partially due to having that ridiculous margarine tub (and now the even bigger one), but I find it does wash away if you ride in really wet conditions.

But on the plus side, it stays pretty clean, compared to Phil's like I mentioned before (turning black).