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Tool Nerds, Questions and Tool Snobbery

Lemke

Chimp
Aug 22, 2019
16
14
I enjoy these threads... as I'm a much better mechanic than a rider. LOL. My favorite most-used tools are these... a Gedore 1-10Nm break-over torque wrench. Super accurate for suspension rebuilds and clamping carbon fiber bits to a bike. A "Fix-It-Sticks" ratcheting 3-way tool, with removable hex drive bits. I use this for pre-race bolt checks... a 6mm for the axles, a 4mm ball end (on the ratchet) for saddle clamp bolts, and a 5mm ball end for caliper mount bolts. I also keep an Abbey 4-way tool handy as well.
 

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junkyard

You might feel a little prick.
Sep 1, 2015
1,737
1,240
San Diego
1444F0A6-B0C0-427D-B7E2-B8EA44E249C9.jpeg
972C8AA2-0F53-4A57-852D-AB8894A5AA1E.jpeg

I have problems. There’s a few more around in some tool bags or the camper. I have one I drilled full of holes. I’m trying not to buy anymore and covid is helping with no swap meets.
 

HardtailHack

used an iron once
Jan 20, 2009
3,310
1,031
I enjoy these threads... as I'm a much better mechanic than a rider. LOL. My favorite most-used tools are these... a Gedore 1-10Nm break-over torque wrench. Super accurate for suspension rebuilds and clamping carbon fiber bits to a bike. A "Fix-It-Sticks" ratcheting 3-way tool, with removable hex drive bits. I use this for pre-race bolt checks... a 6mm for the axles, a 4mm ball end (on the ratchet) for saddle clamp bolts, and a 5mm ball end for caliper mount bolts. I also keep an Abbey 4-way tool handy as well.
Sweet, I've been looking at buying a used 3/4" Torque Wrench and I've been looking at Gedore, Hazet and if one comes up at the right price, Stahlwille.
For price/size and weight the fixed drive Gedore is winning the race, this would be my only secondhand wrench but I very rarely use one of this size and I get free calibrations so it should be okay. They have one with a slip on cheater handle too.
 

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Leafy

Monkey
Sep 13, 2019
103
73
Remind me to bring my nut extractors if I have to work on anything junkyard did.
 

maxyedor

<b>TOOL PRO</b>
Oct 20, 2005
4,288
1,640
In the bathroom, fighting a battle
Buying the Makita inflator next time I hit the Depot, so I'll report back. Have the Milwaukee M12 and Makita 18v platforms, but the 18v inflator seems like a better bet, if only because the batteries should last longer when doing truck tires.
Update, bought the Makita, well, got it free with some batteries I bought, and it's sweet. Definitely not the best tool for reinflation truck tires from 12-15PSI, but for the suspension air bags, quick tire checks, and bike tires it's fully rad. Set the PSI, hook it on, hold the trigger for a few seconds, done. Well for the $0 I paid for it, and would definitely buy one for $90 if there weren't Christmas deals going on.

Going to look into an extra hose and a quick change with a presta native chuck since it'll likely get the most use on bikes, the adapter works, but it's not the best.
 

6thElement

Schrodinger's Immigrant
Jul 29, 2008
9,546
6,409
I have a Syntace one, random search shows it's on ebay for $80, I think I may have paid double that 10+ years ago.


Looks like they have a different version in their product list now, but no complaints with mine.
 

ebarker9

Monkey
Oct 2, 2007
587
71
I have a standard issue bicycle torque range torque wrench as well as one for working on my car. My general assumption is that none of the torque specs for either application actually require a level of precision from these tools beyond the, likely poor, factory calibration. Particularly on bikes, I view these specs as being essentially a limit to try to reduce the number of people who vastly overtighten things. That being said, I'd be interested in calibrating my wrenches if it was actually a worthwhile thing to do. Yes, I can hang weights from them and do it myself but...I don't really want to. Are there places that provide this service that wouldn't cost more than several multiples of the original tool cost?
 

junkyard

You might feel a little prick.
Sep 1, 2015
1,737
1,240
San Diego
I have a standard issue bicycle torque range torque wrench as well as one for working on my car. My general assumption is that none of the torque specs for either application actually require a level of precision from these tools beyond the, likely poor, factory calibration. Particularly on bikes, I view these specs as being essentially a limit to try to reduce the number of people who vastly overtighten things. That being said, I'd be interested in calibrating my wrenches if it was actually a worthwhile thing to do. Yes, I can hang weights from them and do it myself but...I don't really want to. Are there places that provide this service that wouldn't cost more than several multiples of the original tool cost?
I’m thinking it depends on the town you live in. But lots of people and industry use torque wrench’s so should be lots of places doing it.
 

Leafy

Monkey
Sep 13, 2019
103
73
My company calibrates internally, we have basically only of those digital torque adapters that are like socket extensions, but like really nice and that's sent out yearly to a lab to get nist certified.
 

maxyedor

<b>TOOL PRO</b>
Oct 20, 2005
4,288
1,640
In the bathroom, fighting a battle
Google "Calibration labs near me" any semi civilized local should have a lab that'll calibrate your wrench. Usually costs $10-25, but there mite be a minimum for your local lab, or you mite get lucky and they'll do it for free if they make their real money from large companies on contract.

I've recommended it a million times, but for bike shit, this is my favorite torque wrench https://www.amazon.com/Products-TorqControl-TLA28NM-Screwdriver-Magnetic/dp/B01DIRD5CG/ref=sr_1_34?dchild=1&keywords=cdi+torque+handle&qid=1607619421&sr=8-34
 

ebarker9

Monkey
Oct 2, 2007
587
71
Update, bought the Makita, well, got it free with some batteries I bought, and it's sweet. Definitely not the best tool for reinflation truck tires from 12-15PSI, but for the suspension air bags, quick tire checks, and bike tires it's fully rad. Set the PSI, hook it on, hold the trigger for a few seconds, done. Well for the $0 I paid for it, and would definitely buy one for $90 if there weren't Christmas deals going on.

Going to look into an extra hose and a quick change with a presta native chuck since it'll likely get the most use on bikes, the adapter works, but it's not the best.
I just picked one up as well and seems like it will work nicely for what I want it to do. Did you look any further into a replacement chuck? The stock one could definitely be better. Think I'm probably a 90/10 presta/schrader user with this.
 

junkyard

You might feel a little prick.
Sep 1, 2015
1,737
1,240
San Diego
Have you determined which is best at rounding off bolts and sending your knuckles into sharp edges at mach 4 vs any of the others?
yes most of them. There are a couple of vise grip styles that grip very well if you can’t get to the other side like through a firewall or bolting down a seatbelt.

mostly though I never use a crescent wrench on bolts. Sometimes on nuts, especially if a wrench is sloppy on it. Whore wrenches are great on soft copper fittings and other plumbing fittings when you maintain pressure on the adjustment screw. Also bending things. Weird things with flats like tie rods. I like to not mess up the jaws on my whore wrenches so they don’t mare things. Also I never buy loose ones unless they are some interesting brand and old.
 

hyt

Chimp
Dec 22, 2020
3
1
Do any of you guys bother with a torque wrench? I'm toying with getting one...
I have 4 so far, from 20 in-lb on up to 300 ft-lb for the axle nuts on the car. Always keep two in my bike tool bag, the 1/4-drive 20-200 in-lb one and the 3/8-drive 20-100 ft-lb one. I use them often.
 

Adventurous

Starshine Bro
Mar 19, 2014
7,374
4,655
Crawlorado
Wrench talk.

Looking to pick up a set of regular combination wrenches, and a set of 15* offset ratcheting, reversible combination wrenches. Both metric, covering at least 10-19mm. Prefer full polish, decent quality, and thin enough heads for access. Not using them every day, so I don't necessitate tool truck prices, I'm just a hobbyist who likes nice stuff.

Already have a set of Craftsman, made in USA raised-panel combination wrenches, which are okay. Have a set of Husky wrenches that I despise and will never be convinced to buy Husky again. Got a set of long, box end Gearwrenches with one fixed end and one flex ratcheting.

So what are my options?

Craftsman
Tekton
Icon
Gearwrench
Williams
Wright
Nipro
Facom
Hazet
SK
Proto
Mac
Matco
Snap-On

Any in particular worth my consideration and monies? Seem to be pros and cons to each, and I'd love to hear from some of you guys who may have more time with these things than I do.
 
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4xBoy

Turbo Monkey
Jun 20, 2006
5,729
835
Minneapolis
Snap-on
Wrench talk.

Looking to pick up a set of regular combination wrenches, and a set of 15* offset ratcheting, reversible combination wrenches. Both metric, covering at least 10-19mm. Prefer full polish, decent quality, and thin enough heads for access. Not using them every day, so I don't necessitate tool truck prices, I'm just a hobbyist who likes nice stuff.

Already have a set of Craftsman, made in USA raised-panel combination wrenches, which are okay. Have a set of Husky wrenches that I despise and will never be convinced to buy Husky again. Got a set of long, box end Gearwrenches with one fixed end and one flex ratcheting.

So what are my options?

Craftsman
Tekton
Icon
Gearwrench
Williams
Wright
Nipro
Facom
Hazet
SK
Proto
Mac
Matco
Snap-On

Any in particular worth my consideration and monies? Seem to be pros and cons to each, and I'd love to hear from some of you guys who may have more time with these things than I do.
Snap-on flex head.
 

Attachments

HardtailHack

used an iron once
Jan 20, 2009
3,310
1,031
Wrench talk.

Looking to pick up a set of regular combination wrenches, and a set of 15* offset ratcheting, reversible combination wrenches. Both metric, covering at least 10-19mm. Prefer full polish, decent quality, and thin enough heads for access. Not using them every day, so I don't necessitate tool truck prices, I'm just a hobbyist who likes nice stuff.

Already have a set of Craftsman, made in USA raised-panel combination wrenches, which are okay. Have a set of Husky wrenches that I despise and will never be convinced to buy Husky again. Got a set of long, box end Gearwrenches with one fixed end and one flex ratcheting.

So what are my options?

Craftsman
Tekton
Icon
Gearwrench
Williams
Wright
Nipro
Facom
Hazet
SK
Proto
Mac
Matco
Snap-On

Any in particular worth my consideration and monies? Seem to be pros and cons to each, and I'd love to hear from some of you guys who may have more time with these things than I do.
The patent that expired this year meant that a certain amount of every ratcheting ring spanner was made in Taiwan. I have Stahlwillles which are fully made in Taiwan I believe and they are at the pointy end of the price range. They are light, have a nice offset and aren't full polish, full polish sucks if you are working in ATF or brake fluid, the tools become unusable in my opinion, especially since I have to wear Nitrile gloves coz of COVID.

If the Stahlwilles weren't super light I wouldn't buy them again, the FWD/REV buttons are a bit too big and change directions in confined locations plus they don't seem to be rebuildable, a big one is that every spanner has the number 17 on it, so if somebody grabs you a 17 it is usually not a 17mm spanner, oh and the tool roll has the big spanners from the left, coz Germany I guess..........
I bought my dad a Bahco set and they seem to be more than adequate for home use, bit sharp on the edges which may annoy if you have Carpool Tunnel.

Hazet aren't supposed to be that good, Proto and Facom are owned by the same but I think Proto still do some US manufacturing..... I have heaps of old Proto spanners and sockets and they are pretty shit, at one point their double ring spanners were fucking amazing, nice flat sides and the rings were slightly deeper than normal but they were super thin wall.
For some reason we get Facom stuff rebranded as Sidchrome in Australia but it is really cheap compared to the northern hemisphere prices. The quality doesn't seem to be any better than the other cookie cutter brands(have mini ratchet sets at work), internet suggests the quality has come down a lot since they were bought out, I was looking at some Facom inhexes a while ago and the internet talked me out of getting them, ended up getting a SP Tools sliding inhex set but they were so shit I gave them away.
Sorry I have gone off topic, here is a picture with some arrows-
1609267788110.png
 

Adventurous

Starshine Bro
Mar 19, 2014
7,374
4,655
Crawlorado
Snap-on


Snap-on flex head.
UGH. I hate hearing that, because I am a tool snob and always look at Snap-On first. Recently upgraded my ratchets from some Made is USA Craftsmans to Snap-On comfort grip, cause their ratchets are, IMO, worth it.

Just hurts dropping $300+ on multiple sets of wrenches for personal use. Guess I'll keep an eye on FB marketplace and ebay for good deals.

The patent that expired this year meant that a certain amount of every ratcheting ring spanner was made in Taiwan. I have Stahlwillles which are fully made in Taiwan I believe and they are at the pointy end of the price range. They are light, have a nice offset and aren't full polish, full polish sucks if you are working in ATF or brake fluid, the tools become unusable in my opinion, especially since I have to wear Nitrile gloves coz of COVID.

If the Stahlwilles weren't super light I wouldn't buy them again, the FWD/REV buttons are a bit too big and change directions in confined locations plus they don't seem to be rebuildable, a big one is that every spanner has the number 17 on it, so if somebody grabs you a 17 it is usually not a 17mm spanner, oh and the tool roll has the big spanners from the left, coz Germany I guess..........
I bought my dad a Bahco set and they seem to be more than adequate for home use, bit sharp on the edges which may annoy if you have Carpool Tunnel.

Hazet aren't supposed to be that good, Proto and Facom are owned by the same but I think Proto still do some US manufacturing..... I have heaps of old Proto spanners and sockets and they are pretty shit, at one point their double ring spanners were fucking amazing, nice flat sides and the rings were slightly deeper than normal but they were super thin wall.
For some reason we get Facom stuff rebranded as Sidchrome in Australia but it is really cheap compared to the northern hemisphere prices. The quality doesn't seem to be any better than the other cookie cutter brands(have mini ratchet sets at work), internet suggests the quality has come down a lot since they were bought out, I was looking at some Facom inhexes a while ago and the internet talked me out of getting them, ended up getting a SP Tools sliding inhex set but they were so shit I gave them away.
Sorry I have gone off topic, here is a picture with some arrows-
View attachment 154156
Thanks for the chart, and I forgot about Stahlwille. No huge bias against Taiwanese tools, as they've gotten loads better in recent years, but it always feels like I'm being taken when they cost damn near what US or tools from zee Germans will run you.

Mcmaster is THE company.
Always disappointed when places use Grainger instead. Not that Grainger has a poor selection, I just don't use their website as the reference for also all hardware I need.
 

4xBoy

Turbo Monkey
Jun 20, 2006
5,729
835
Minneapolis
UGH. I hate hearing that, because I am a tool snob and always look at Snap-On first. Recently upgraded my ratchets from some Made is USA Craftsmans to Snap-On comfort grip, cause their ratchets are, IMO, worth it.

Just hurts dropping $300+ on multiple sets of wrenches for personal use. Guess I'll keep an eye on FB marketplace and ebay for good deals.

Always disappointed when places use Grainger instead. Not that Grainger has a poor selection, I just don't use their website as the reference for also all hardware I need.
I wouldn't buy snap-on now, cause I can't afford it, but twenty years ago I was in a different place.
 

Adventurous

Starshine Bro
Mar 19, 2014
7,374
4,655
Crawlorado
I wouldn't buy snap-on now, cause I can't afford it, but twenty years ago I was in a different place.
Its a bit tougher as an ordinary consumer, without regular stops by the tool truck. Always buying at retail, cant take advantage of sales or promotions, and warranty is more of a hassle.

Their stuff is still top notch, but the value proposition at this is point is questionable given how good a lot of the foreign offerings are.