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Tool Nerds, Questions and Tool Snobbery

maxyedor

<b>TOOL PRO</b>
Oct 20, 2005
5,496
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In the bathroom, fighting a battle
I've owned the installation driver for a few years now, and it's one of those tools that I'm glad I own but probably wouldn't miss if I didn't. The accessories are handy but I've only needed them a few times over that period, and I've used it a lot. It's one of those tools that's useful for all but mandatory for a few.

I really wish Mikwaukee would bring the foreign market drill/driver form factor version of the tool to North America. I'd find that more useful.
$191/delivered for the installation driver, two batteries and a 3/8 m12 ratchet. Guess I’ll find out how useful it is.

The torque limited hex drive seems like it will be a good addition, for some reason I hate using hex bits in my regular drill, but do like the clutch for torque limiting on wood screws.

Not sure I really want the ratchet, never use my air powered one, but also rarely ever use air powered tools at all. Probably handy for pulling engine covers and hose clamps.
 

Adventurous

Starshine Bro
Mar 19, 2014
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$191/delivered for the installation driver, two batteries and a 3/8 m12 ratchet. Guess I’ll find out how useful it is.

The torque limited hex drive seems like it will be a good addition, for some reason I hate using hex bits in my regular drill, but do like the clutch for torque limiting on wood screws.

Not sure I really want the ratchet, never use my air powered one, but also rarely ever use air powered tools at all. Probably handy for pulling engine covers and hose clamps.
The torque limiting + hex is the best part of the whole thing, with the swappable heads being a bonus. Interface is a bit goofy with the push buttons forward/reverse switch, but it seems they prioritized a smidgen of additional clearance vs leveraging the same interface almost every drill/driver has ever used. The magnetic bit on the front comes in handy though.

I've got the 3/8" ratchet too, and it hasn't been as handy as I would have hoped. Great for spinning lots of nuts on and off at a moderate torque, but the physical size has proven an impediment. Oh well.
 

Adventurous

Starshine Bro
Mar 19, 2014
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@maxyedor

Revisiting an earlier topic, since I've been doing a pile of coping recently. The Knew Concepts coping saw, while disappointing for the price, performs fabulously. Both of these pics are right off the saw. Tracks great due to the high tension.

20230925_152945_copy_1000x750.jpg


20230925_153107_copy_750x1000.jpg
 

HardtailHack

used an iron once
Jan 20, 2009
6,742
5,631
Just nabbed one of these in rough condition with fence for $78 Aussie dollars delivered, might need a couple of bearings but that is an easy fix. Should do for a cheap/nasty router table.
1695817164304.png
 

maxyedor

<b>TOOL PRO</b>
Oct 20, 2005
5,496
3,141
In the bathroom, fighting a battle
Bought myself some tiny prybars a month back, these are Lisle brand and have become shockingly handy. Now I just need to figure out what to do about my large prybars, POS Snap Ons are all fuckered up

I also worked on my bike for the first time in about 9 months, last time I tinkered it was to install a tire and brake pads, today was just a tire, it’s been one whole tire since I tinkered on a bike.

343C5624-E9DF-4A6E-92CA-7F0E7331E28E.jpeg
 

Leafy

Monkey
Sep 13, 2019
549
358
You meant cutting die? You’ll get a couple dozen parts out of mild steel with this one using it to make fresh threads. https://www.mscdirect.com/product/details/09037896 and it’ll take a while, you gotta do multiple passes, closing the adjuster each time till you get the fit right. If you have to do more than a few it would probably justify the purchase of a cheap mini lathe to single point the thread.
 

HardtailHack

used an iron once
Jan 20, 2009
6,742
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You meant cutting die? You’ll get a couple dozen parts out of mild steel with this one using it to make fresh threads. https://www.mscdirect.com/product/details/09037896 and it’ll take a while, you gotta do multiple passes, closing the adjuster each time till you get the fit right. If you have to do more than a few it would probably justify the purchase of a cheap mini lathe to single point the thread.
I'm cutting thread on some stainless rod.
Would you have any idea of a company who makes those cutting tools in Japan?
The decent stuff here that isn't stupid money seems to be Japanese made and rebranded by a local company.
EDIT- But they don't have the size I need locally, I gave up trying to get a decent tap, it was cheaper to buy weld in bungs for tierods.
 
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HardtailHack

used an iron once
Jan 20, 2009
6,742
5,631
Got a little bit done on the hub nut tool thingy.
Gotta drill the middle piece for the top slide then make some guides up and tack them in place.
IMG_20231014_224417.jpg

I love die grinding, which is lucky as I don't have any carbide hole saws. Plus I already had a hole there and plans changed when I bought weld in rod ends.
PXL_20231014_043135936.jpg


IMG_20231014_163845.jpg

No more tools from stainless, I'll just deal with rust.
 

Leafy

Monkey
Sep 13, 2019
549
358
Bite the bullet and get a cerakote setup. It holds up way better than spray paint, and it lays on super thin so it doesn’t mess up tolerances. Check out my super cheap setup, I think between the guns and oven I actually have less in equipment than a quart of the coating costs. But that coating goes a really really long way.

 

Leafy

Monkey
Sep 13, 2019
549
358
What type of tool holder does that go into? It’s got flats for a side lock but the shank looks really short and that flat with the cam looking groove looks purposeful.
 

Adventurous

Starshine Bro
Mar 19, 2014
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Bite the bullet and get a cerakote setup. It holds up way better than spray paint, and it lays on super thin so it doesn’t mess up tolerances. Check out my super cheap setup, I think between the guns and oven I actually have less in equipment than a quart of the coating costs. But that coating goes a really really long way.

Deets? Share with the class plz.

Everything I've ever spray painted has been a disappointment. I'd rather a cerakote setup than PC.
 

Leafy

Monkey
Sep 13, 2019
549
358
Deets? Share with the class plz.

Everything I've ever spray painted has been a disappointment. I'd rather a cerakote setup than PC.
ok so I run the two gun set from harbor freight, use the small gun for small parts. I guess I left out of the price the air compressor because I already have one. The oven is a heat gun (harbor freight, obviously), a cardboard box, and one of the Chinese 115v thermostat relays. The relays are like $5 on aliexpress or like $15 on amazon. If you’re going to do big stuff you’ll want a sand blaster for prep, but red scotch bright works fine for prepping small parts (even though cerakotes instructions say it doesn’t, they’ll tell you of your a big custom that is ok). You’ll also want like at least a tub or something your parts fit in so you can degrease them, I just used my ultrasonic cleaner with simple green, but just a Rubbermaid tote with simple green will work. If you’re going to run an oven to much larger than mine you may want to get two relays and two heat guns or build a better insulated one, I was pushing the limit with my setup for doing spokes. Then you can do cool shit like this.

 

Adventurous

Starshine Bro
Mar 19, 2014
10,332
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WTF is with framing nailers? Building code calls for 16p common nails (3 1/2" x 0.162") for a lot of common framing connections, yet I can only find a single pneumatic gun that'll shoot that size. Most seem to be shooting 3 1/4" x 0.131", or maybe 0.148". Are framers just shooting an extra nail or two to make up the difference? Do building inspectors just not care?

Everything is pointing to a Metabo gun, but damn, 0.131 isn't even equivalent to a 16p sinker...
 

Leafy

Monkey
Sep 13, 2019
549
358
Can you even buy 21* 3.5” long nails? Or larger than .131? My HF 21* nailer claims it can do 3.5” long ones I’ve only ever seen 3.25” long nails at most.
 
WTF is with framing nailers? Building code calls for 16p common nails (3 1/2" x 0.162") for a lot of common framing connections, yet I can only find a single pneumatic gun that'll shoot that size. Most seem to be shooting 3 1/4" x 0.131", or maybe 0.148". Are framers just shooting an extra nail or two to make up the difference? Do building inspectors just not care?

Everything is pointing to a Metabo gun, but damn, 0.131 isn't even equivalent to a 16p sinker...
Pneumatic nailers suck. variations in wood density mean that driving depth varies all over the place.
 

Adventurous

Starshine Bro
Mar 19, 2014
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Pneumatic nailers suck. variations in wood density mean that driving depth varies all over the place.
That may be, but I've framed enough by hand and by gun to know that if it's a significant number of fasteners, I'm bringing out the gun, slight variations in driving depth be damned. I can appreciate wanting to hand nail, but IMO it falls on the wrong side of the time-value spectrum.
 

Leafy

Monkey
Sep 13, 2019
549
358
If you care about getting the nails the same depth then the cordless framing nailers are probably more up your aisle. My buddy built a significant amount of his house with one, loved not having to fuck around with air hoses. Based on this video they’ve gotten a lot faster since I looked at them like 6 years ago.

 

Adventurous

Starshine Bro
Mar 19, 2014
10,332
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If you care about getting the nails the same depth then the cordless framing nailers are probably more up your aisle. My buddy built a significant amount of his house with one, loved not having to fuck around with air hoses. Based on this video they’ve gotten a lot faster since I looked at them like 6 years ago.

Funny you say that, I'm actually going pneumatic because of a recent experience with a cordless gun. Old man brought his Milwaukee over to attach 4 pieces of sheathing and the weight of that thing loaded + battery was murder.

I despise cords/hoses (a good 1/4" lightweight hose is a gift from the gods) and lugging around a compressor, but you better hit the weight room if any sustained nailing with a cordless gun is in your future.

EDIT: Plus, a good pneumatic should last a decade+ and can be rebuilt when it goes down. I have little confidence the same can be said for any of the cordless guns.
 
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HardtailHack

used an iron once
Jan 20, 2009
6,742
5,631
It is pretty cool how long the pneumatic guns go for, the framing rigs I see just have normal handheld guns bolted to them and I'm not sure they even get serviced yearly, they just get swapped out when they fail and a shop across the road from me rebuilds them.
Pretty sure they are a fairly old model Bostich coil gun.
 

Adventurous

Starshine Bro
Mar 19, 2014
10,332
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Crawlorado
It is pretty cool how long the pneumatic guns go for, the framing rigs I see just have normal handheld guns bolted to them and I'm not sure they even get serviced yearly, they just get swapped out when they fail and a shop across the road from me rebuilds them.
Pretty sure they are a fairly old model Bostich coil gun.
Most pneumatic guns rebuilds are simple o-rings and seals, nothing crazy. And given how ubiquitous parts are, they'll still be available 10+ years from now. Being diligent about oiling will go a long ways towards extending life.

The same can't be said for cordless guns with their nitrogen, flywheel, and ignition based systems.
 

HardtailHack

used an iron once
Jan 20, 2009
6,742
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Finally got some useful bits for the air hammer, seems there's nothing over this way in 1/2" shank.
I'll be pretty keen to try the nut buster, slap a sacrificial socket on and turn the shank with a spanner as you beat it to hell and hope tool steel doesn't go everywhere.
PXL_20231025_095356397.jpg
 

maxyedor

<b>TOOL PRO</b>
Oct 20, 2005
5,496
3,141
In the bathroom, fighting a battle
WTF is with framing nailers? Building code calls for 16p common nails (3 1/2" x 0.162") for a lot of common framing connections, yet I can only find a single pneumatic gun that'll shoot that size. Most seem to be shooting 3 1/4" x 0.131", or maybe 0.148". Are framers just shooting an extra nail or two to make up the difference? Do building inspectors just not care?

Everything is pointing to a Metabo gun, but damn, 0.131 isn't even equivalent to a 16p sinker...
What sorts of connections are you making? Wood to wood, or brackets? 3-1/2x.162 is the standard around here for Simpson brackets into 4x lumber. 3-1/4x131 is all your wood to wood connections through 2x stock, hence the Matabo shoots them. Nobody shoots 3-1/2s because they always poke through when sistering.

Also worth checking to see if they allow code listed screws, here you can use Simpson GRK and Fastenmaster for most things that would otherwise require a sinker. They’re a little spendy but worth every penny to not be swinging a hammer.
 

Leafy

Monkey
Sep 13, 2019
549
358
There’s a coil gun for those structural screws too iirc if you’re really looking to save time. I think it’s a metabo product.
 

Adventurous

Starshine Bro
Mar 19, 2014
10,332
8,898
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What sorts of connections are you making? Wood to wood, or brackets? 3-1/2x.162 is the standard around here for Simpson brackets into 4x lumber. 3-1/4x131 is all your wood to wood connections through 2x stock, hence the Matabo shoots them. Nobody shoots 3-1/2s because they always poke through when sistering.

Also worth checking to see if they allow code listed screws, here you can use Simpson GRK and Fastenmaster for most things that would otherwise require a sinker. They’re a little spendy but worth every penny to not be swinging a hammer.
Wood to wood framing, sheathing, subfloor, aiming to get a framing nailer that can handle all those. The Metabo looks like it can.

Published nailing schedule, stated as being unique to this state. Caveat, unless otherwise specified by a registered design professional.
Screenshot_20231026_091312_Drive.jpg


I can't imagine every single project has a different nailing schedule specified by a registered design professional, leading me to believe nobody cares.

I fully intend to use GRKs where it makes sense, but all things considered, in some places (sheathing) the nailer + nails is probably break even vs. screws.
 

maxyedor

<b>TOOL PRO</b>
Oct 20, 2005
5,496
3,141
In the bathroom, fighting a battle
Ah yes the classic “either use an engineer or here’s a list of overkill so we don’t have to think about it” approach. Luckily our local codes are written by engineers so they all have reasonable requirements and their minimum design standards for projects without an engineering are pretty spot on. They don’t do dumb shit like that.

Solid chance no inspector gives a shit unless you’re doing something obviously stupid, or they’re looking to add line items to a red tag because you were a dick.
 

Leafy

Monkey
Sep 13, 2019
549
358
So the building codes are more of guidelines than rules. It seems wild to me that New Hampshire has actually enforced building codes and depending on the town actually strict ones. Durham has you practically having to do custom home level of detaining to pass the insulation and blower door requirements. And the build reg for decks seem designed for you to be able to pack the deck full of 600 lb life people and have them jump in unison.
 

Westy

the teste
Nov 22, 2002
54,421
20,214
Sleazattle
So the building codes are more of guidelines than rules. It seems wild to me that New Hampshire has actually enforced building codes and depending on the town actually strict ones. Durham has you practically having to do custom home level of detaining to pass the insulation and blower door requirements. And the build reg for decks seem designed for you to be able to pack the deck full of 600 lb life people and have them jump in unison.
They are designed to the worst case load scenario, which is the high school house party.
 

Adventurous

Starshine Bro
Mar 19, 2014
10,332
8,898
Crawlorado
So the building codes are more of guidelines than rules. It seems wild to me that New Hampshire has actually enforced building codes and depending on the town actually strict ones. Durham has you practically having to do custom home level of detaining to pass the insulation and blower door requirements. And the build reg for decks seem designed for you to be able to pack the deck full of 600 lb life people and have them jump in unison.
Right, my town has adopted the stretch code, which imposes stricter requirements on everyone, particularly in regards to energy efficiency. I get it, but at the same time thats going to be a huge middle finger to a huge number of people.

Neighbor (GC) also mentioned something about the town asking people to expand the scope of their projects to address non-current code compliant aspects of their house. Want to replace a window or two? Now you get to replace a whole house worth! People are pulling out of projects left and right cause the costs have ballooned for seemingly simple things.