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True Precision Stealth hub

?????

Turbo Monkey
Jun 20, 2005
1,685
2
San Francisco
I'm cross-posting this from Tech because it wasn't getting much attention there. Maybe someone here will have an idea.

I've had this rear hub for a few years now and it's developed a problem where I'm guessing it's getting some friction built up in it because when I'm going fast and coasting the chain will start to load up above the chainstay and start to sag while the length of chain along the bottom will tighten up and stretch the rear derailleur out.

It obviously gets worse when I'm coasting and then backpedal. Also the smaller the cog, the more the problem shows up. It almost never happens in the largest cogs even if I'm going kinda fast.

The Stealth hub uses some sort of clutch packs I believe...I actually have no clue how it really works, but it's instant engagement and worked really nice before so I'd like to figure out what's wrong and how to fix it...plus it was really expensive.

Thanks.
 

amateur

Turbo Monkey
Apr 18, 2002
1,019
0
Orange County
Sounds like the freehub is starting to seize up. The reason it doesn't do it in larger chain rings is because there's more leverage for the chain to stay as it is. Having never seen the inside of one, I can't tell you what to do, however take it apart if you're confident you can, check it for a) broken pieces b) excessive grease/gunk build up. Call the manufacturer and see what they recommend as far as grease/oil for the free hub. Hope this helps.
 

binary visions

The voice of reason
Jun 13, 2002
21,695
498
NC
Yep, amateur has got it, the freehub is starting to go and it's giving some resistance.

If you're confident in your mechanical abilities and can work in a clean environment, I'd just take it apart and give it a good cleaning. Did the documentation that came with it tell you what kind of grease it uses?

Wish the new version of those hubs wasn't vaporware... I thought it was a pretty cool idea.
 

?????

Turbo Monkey
Jun 20, 2005
1,685
2
San Francisco
binary visions said:
Yep, amateur has got it, the freehub is starting to go and it's giving some resistance.

If you're confident in your mechanical abilities and can work in a clean environment, I'd just take it apart and give it a good cleaning. Did the documentation that came with it tell you what kind of grease it uses?

Wish the new version of those hubs wasn't vaporware... I thought it was a pretty cool idea.
I can probably take it apart fine. I don't have any paperwork on it though.

By vaporware, do you mean they aren't making hubs anymore? Their website is still up but I haven't really been keeping up with all my bike news since I got my Jeep.
 

zmtber

Turbo Monkey
Aug 13, 2005
2,437
0
i have had this problem, but it is usually my chain guide that is at falt
 

wydopen

Turbo Monkey
Jan 16, 2005
1,232
60
805
the machine shop is still in buisness but as far as i know they arnt in mtb buisness anymore..ask punkasssean he will know..the company is in sb
 

bomberboy11

Monkey
Jul 15, 2005
665
0
At a computer...duh
True Precision is still in business and still have the bike hub part of the business active (I think), although they aren't doing the production numbers they used to. That sounds to me like dirt in the freewheel. It won't have anything to do with the chainguide if the problem comes only when coasting (hence the chain loading above the chainstay). I'm sure Todd (TP owner) would have no problem fixing that up.
 

?????

Turbo Monkey
Jun 20, 2005
1,685
2
San Francisco
well, while we're on subject of chainguides...anyone have problems with thier evil chainguide becoming opaque and cracking/splitting? Back when I took my bike apart to polish it, I also thoroughly washed and degreased all of my parts. My evil bashring was perfectly clear but when I used brake parts cleaner (it works as a good degreaser) to clean the bashring it turned opaque and caused it to split and crack where I had hit it before.

This is not a close up pic, but it's all I have on my computer right now.

 

dw

Wiffle Ball ninja
Sep 10, 2001
2,944
0
MV
????? said:
well, while we're on subject of chainguides...anyone have problems with thier evil chainguide becoming opaque and cracking/splitting? Back when I took my bike apart to polish it, I also thoroughly washed and degreased all of my parts. My evil bashring was perfectly clear but when I used brake parts cleaner (it works as a good degreaser) to clean the bashring it turned opaque and caused it to split and crack where I had hit it before.
Yup, as the other guys said, brake cleaner is one of the things that does not work well with most plastics. You should really replace all of the plaastic parts, becuase they all are made of similar polycarbonate alloy parts on the 05 and earlier models. (06 and later are composite) You can get whatever size Supercharger that you want and the guide plastics for $45 or less total online. Ben at Unreal has some deals on Evil branded superchargers still.

hope this helps

Dave
 

kidwoo

Celebrating No-Pants Day
Aug 25, 2003
23,674
3,056
In my pants
????? said:
I'm cross-posting this from Tech because it wasn't getting much attention there. Maybe someone here will have an idea.

I've had this rear hub for a few years now and it's developed a problem where I'm guessing it's getting some friction built up in it because when I'm going fast and coasting the chain will start to load up above the chainstay and start to sag while the length of chain along the bottom will tighten up and stretch the rear derailleur out.

It obviously gets worse when I'm coasting and then backpedal. Also the smaller the cog, the more the problem shows up. It almost never happens in the largest cogs even if I'm going kinda fast.

The Stealth hub uses some sort of clutch packs I believe...I actually have no clue how it really works, but it's instant engagement and worked really nice before so I'd like to figure out what's wrong and how to fix it...plus it was really expensive.

Thanks.
Those hubs work on kind of neat little needle bearing friction thing. Engagement works by putting pressure on the needles (kind of big actually) and essentially locking them out.

I was fortunate enought to stop by a friend's house while he was rebuilding his. He had been racing the norba east coast stuff last year in a bunch of mud/rain and his hub started doing the same thing. It just needed a cleaning and regrease. I didn't see how he disassembled it but it was pretty straight foreward once it was apart. they're not that complicated. He actually had some rusty looking condensation/water in it.
 

CreeP

Monkey
Mar 8, 2002
695
0
montreal bitch
that's what i would figure. if you aren't hearing like crunchy noises it's going to be excess friction that's your problem.

dw, why the heck do you keep calling polymers alloys?
 

fiddy_ryder

Turbo Monkey
Jun 17, 2005
1,655
0
Hollywood
vitox said:
weel your problem with the bashring is that you dissolved it, read the manual, if im not mistaken theres a paragraph on that.
it even says on the brake cleaner, *not safe for plastic!!* there are plastic safe brake aerosol brake cleaners, but you have to get the ones that say it on the can! so basically you ruined it. you could try to get it replaced, but odds are its not gonna happen since you damaged it.
 

RD

Monkey
Jul 31, 2003
689
0
Boston, MA
The Stealth hub uses a needle-roller clutch bearing. Pretty cool stuff. If you clean the bearing and it still won't do, just press in a new one. If you have access to an arbor press with large enough throat, or an a-frame press you're good to go. Most likely you won't have a press large enough though and will need to unlace the hub to get it in there. Or maybe you can rig up something with a bearing puller. Once you do that, press out the old bearing and install a new one. I bet it is a stock size at McMaster.

From the McMaster website: Clutch bearings roll in one direction, then lock to transmit torque load when the rotation of the shaft is reversed (an arrow on the drawn-steel outer shell indicates load direction). Use for indexing, backstopping, and overrunning operations on hardened and ground shafts. Low profile is great for limited spaces. They may be used in conjunction with needle-roller bearings to provide a load-carrying capacity in addition to the clutch action.

www.mcmaster.com type in "needle-roller clutch bearing" :)