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welding a frame?

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cjcrashesalot

Monkey
May 15, 2005
326
1
Golden
Hi, I recently snapped a chainstay on my 02 M1, and need some feedback on what is my best option. Obviously, a direct replacement from Intense is the ideal choice, but there are a few other factors: I have a rather important race in 10 days, and from what I've heard, it will most likely take longer than that to get the part to me. Secondly, the cost is $315. So, I looked into having it welded. One welder could do a nice complete job, match it with the other chainstay and have it look the same, for $200. Another welder could fix it, meaning that he would just put the pieces back together like a puzzle and throw some weld on there. This would be cheaper, but also ugly as hell and may not match the length of of the other side well. So, my dilemma is, do I get the cheap weld job now to get me through another race or two? And then get a replacement chainstay in the off season? Or should I get the nice weld job now, and hope it (and the other chainstay) hold out for as long as I have the bike? Thanks, -Chris
 

intensified

Monkey
Mar 31, 2004
512
5
Canton,Ma
I wouldn't hold my breath on intense producing parts again for a bike they stopped making. I hope they do and heard they will, but who knows. Band aid option that is the cheapist gets my vote, then see what the haps is.
 

H8R

Cranky Pants
Nov 10, 2004
13,971
20
sleepinggiant said:
:stupid:

Don't take chances w/ it, heat treating alu frames should be left to those that know what they are doing.

Alot of good weldors can make the repair, but they won't have the heating facilities.

$200 for an ineffective repair ain't worth it.
 

vitox

Turbo Monkey
Sep 23, 2001
2,939
1
Santiago du Chili
from those options id opt for the replacement from intense, and maybe look into having a steel chainstay done, unless your welder can do a reasonable weight (not likely) replacement AND heat treat it for 200usd.

just welding it and not heat treating it might get you through two races but depending on the amount of extra material he is able to put in there and the support he can get for the weld, id give you 50% chance of having another wreck.
 

cjcrashesalot

Monkey
May 15, 2005
326
1
Golden
vitox said:
just welding it and not heat treating it might get you through two races but depending on the amount of extra material he is able to put in there and the support he can get for the weld, id give you 50% chance of having another wreck.
Actually, it wasn't initally cracked in a crash, I'm still not even sure how it happened. From the looks of it, it cracked at a weld, and the crack spread, and one hard impact finished it. But anyways, it only needs to hold for one more race (or maybe two). So if welding aluminum without heat treating is a bad idea, then I may as well get the cheap weld job now, and order the intense replacement chainstays to throw on later.
 
I'd find someplace cheaper. $200 for a little weld like that is crazy. What are we talking, maybe 3inches of a bead? Do the prep work yourself, that will help. Get all the paint and other junk away from the weld area. Make sure it is really clean. I fyou can take in the pieces ready to go it would probably save the welder some grief and you some cash.

But seriously, $200?!@? I think he saw you coming.

Also, you can heat treat aluminum in your oven at home. Or if you work at a pizza joint.
 

Fulton

Monkey
Nov 9, 2001
825
0
get ahold of Risse, they are making replacement rear ends for intense bikes. They told me they are doing FSR rear ends as well. I know a complete rear end: linkage, seatstay, and chainstay go for about $400. I imagine a new chainstay would only be a couple hundred bucks.
 

Fulton

Monkey
Nov 9, 2001
825
0
jet said:
I'd find someplace cheaper. $200 for a little weld like that is crazy. What are we talking, maybe 3inches of a bead? Do the prep work yourself, that will help. Get all the paint and other junk away from the weld area. Make sure it is really clean. I fyou can take in the pieces ready to go it would probably save the welder some grief and you some cash.

But seriously, $200?!@? I think he saw you coming.

Also, you can heat treat aluminum in your oven at home. Or if you work at a pizza joint.
well, i'm assuming that it cracked on an existing weld, and if so, the welder should be grinding down the existing bead. Removing the paint from this before hand, will save him all of 5 seconds.

Also, i'm not 100% on this, but I believe only 7000 series can be oven or age treated, 6000 series requires a slightly more than an oven to get it treated.
 

vitox

Turbo Monkey
Sep 23, 2001
2,939
1
Santiago du Chili
Fulton said:
Also, i'm not 100% on this, but I believe only 7000 series can be oven or age treated, 6000 series requires a slightly more than an oven to get it treated.

7000 series can indeed be treated in a good oven, provided you have an oven big enough to fit the part and that your willing to have it on for 10 hours and that it can keep a constant and uniform temperature.

6000 series you have to "solution heat treat" which is way way WAY above any temperature youll get from an oven intended for food, paint wont be a problem because it just disappears.
 

vitox

Turbo Monkey
Sep 23, 2001
2,939
1
Santiago du Chili
zedro said:
i bet most mass produced frames using 7005 are naturally aged on the boat ride over here....

very likely although i heard from a very inside source that pacific had a new heat treating oven since last year and they were going to start using it on much more models than before, its big enough to house a couple of truck trailers.