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what is this? shimano slx

Zark

Hey little girl, do you want some candy?
Oct 18, 2001
6,257
7
Reno 911
It is the new LX group it sounds like.
22-36 double crankset, cool.
cheap shadow der. woohoo!
 

Dogboy

Turbo Monkey
Apr 12, 2004
3,135
273
Chapel Hill, NC
It kind of replaces LX and Hone. LX is now a Trekking group. It looks pretty solid and there is some new Saint stuff too - although I haven't seen any of that yet.
 

DirtyMike

Turbo Fluffer
Aug 8, 2005
14,361
934
My own world inside my head
I am happy to see improvements to the Midrane levels, helps keep riding affordable for some of us. Like myself, I cant always afford the "top Line" so midline has to do, and its nice to know they are doing things like this to keep the performance level up, even when they cant keep the weights super low. I like it.
 

RaID

Turbo Monkey
the splined rotor shimano is much more user friendly
and more bullet proof in terms of installing than standrd 6 bolt

+ives
- no stripped bolts
- its quicker to install rotors
- tougher design
- most likely easier to manufacture

-gatives
you need a special tool (for oversized version model)
(im assuming ppl generally have the splined tool
to install casettes)


The main problem with it is it hasnt been accepted
by other companies purely because its a "shimano"
thing.
 

Castle

Turbo Monkey
Jun 10, 2002
1,447
0
VA
so, do the '08 xt cranks have a replaceable steel pedal insert as well?

If not that def. would make me lean towards the SLX instead...
 

syadasti

i heart mac
Apr 15, 2002
12,701
290
VT
have you ever picked up a shimano bashie?
Lite.
For an equal comparison gamut's poly BG weighs more than their Al model and the design is almost the same with focus on weight.

Al BG are lighter and they should actually put some slight effort into the article instead of writing something that sounds lifted right off a press release.

Al
G25 (34t) =65g, G45 (40t) =87g

Poly
(34t) =91g, P30 (36t) = 106g, P30 (40t) =117g
 

Banshee Rider

Turbo Monkey
Jul 31, 2003
1,456
10
have you ever picked up a shimano bashie?
Lite.
They also fail, consistantly.

I think shimano did good with their shadow design. However, their brakes still don't work below 32 degree's, they still don't make a lightweight 83mm crank, and their shift components still don't out-perform sram IMO. Although I'm twice as likely to run their stuff now compared to two years ago, I still don't think it'd be considered an "upgrade" for me.
 

syadasti

i heart mac
Apr 15, 2002
12,701
290
VT
their brakes still don't work below 32 degree's
I don't have the 08s but the old XT work fine in cold weather. I've ridden mine (05 XT) plenty of times in freezing weather without an issue. A few weeks ago I was on ride and it was 17 F.
 

Jonny5

Monkey
Feb 13, 2007
503
0
They also fail, consistantly.
I didn't say they were any good! At least shimanos warranty is stella.

syadasti- thats a gamut. Pick up a shimano bashie, I haven't weighed one but there is nothing to them suckas. You can't compare them to other poly bashies as they are highly relieved on the back.
 

Udi

RM Chief Ornithologist: “I Brake for Birds”
Mar 14, 2005
4,838
1,025
the splined rotor shimano is much more user friendly
and more bullet proof in terms of installing than standrd 6 bolt

+ives
- no stripped bolts
- its quicker to install rotors
- tougher design
- most likely easier to manufacture

-gatives
you need a special tool (for oversized version model)
(im assuming ppl generally have the splined tool
to install casettes)


The main problem with it is it hasnt been accepted
by other companies purely because its a "shimano"
thing.
I disagree, the saint rotor develops play after some time in the riveted interface, and all you can do is replace the rotor (I went through a few due to that, thankfully no one wants them so you can get them cheap/free)... so it's certainly not a tougher design. Beyond that, there are lighter 6-bolt rotors available so there's no weight saving to be had either. It's certainly not easier to manufacture, more complex if anything (riveting, two types of metal in rotor, non-standard hubs, machined 2-piece lockring instead of standard bolts).

So ultimately, all you're left with is a setup that's easier to install/remove - but having tried it for two years, I fail to see that as a tangible benefit compared to all the negatives. I'm a pretty big shimano fan but I won't be touching centrelock again (or their hubs, I ran hugi's which were okay but those have their share of flaws too).
 
Oct 14, 2007
394
0
I'm I the only one here not a sucker to Re-Branding? Shimano SLX is nothing truly *new* , look on at all the old mountain bikes, it was on most of them. What shimano is basically doing is making a hardcore version of the XT....and rebranding the hone with all the technology they developed since they first introduced it...
 

syadasti

i heart mac
Apr 15, 2002
12,701
290
VT
I disagree, the saint rotor develops play after some time in the riveted interface, and all you can do is replace the rotor (I went through a few due to that, thankfully no one wants them so you can get them cheap/free)...
Riveted rotors can have issues but Shimano was just following the trend. Hope, Shimano, Magura, etc. Just borrowing tech from motorcycles though.
 

ZHendo

Turbo Monkey
Oct 29, 2006
1,617
84
PNW
i guess i'd still buy the slx cranks if they're stronger at all than hones as from what i understand hones stand up to plenty of abuse fairly well. as for the bashguard argument, i would like to replace my bashguard with a gamut at some point but with an alu one. the gamuts are pretty much the only poly bashes that are under 150 grams, the e13 ones are tanks. i can see why poly bashes are popular though as they won't bend or directly transfer force into the crank assembly where an impact can really do damage.
 

no skid marks

Monkey
Jan 15, 2006
2,514
27
ACT Australia
Damn,I got excited because I thought it said Shimano six(6),I thought they'd bought out a dishless 6 speed rear wheel gear combo with chunky shifting like 8 speed. Oh well.