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Wheels in a hot car

splat

Nam I am
I had my road Bike in the back of my car and it got hot outside ( about 90 ) so inside the car was n oven. when I went to pull my road bike out of the car the front tire was flat , which really surprised me. So I Looked to see if the heat had increased the pressure and blew the tire off , it did not. When I pulled teh tude out to replace it , I checked to see where the leak was , and it turns out that the tube which has been in the wheel for Months and has many many 100's of miles on it, had been patched once before and now the air was leaking out all around the patch. I didn't know heat would botther a patch .
 

blue

boob hater
Jan 24, 2004
10,159
0
california
Patch adhesive melting+expanding rubber of tube and patch at different rates due to different composition=flat tire.
 

Sghost

Turbo Monkey
Jul 13, 2008
1,038
0
NY
Patch a mtb tube if you want, but not worth it if something happens on the road bike.
 

splat

Nam I am
Patch adhesive melting+expanding rubber of tube and patch at different rates due to different composition=flat tire.
I hear where you are coming from , but I'm Not buying it because a) I have put these wheelsthrough tougher termerature gradiants that that and not had an issue teens to 70+ with no issues b) When patching a Tire the Glue per say is actualt a Vulcanizing processthat make the 2 materials 1, c) technically they are not 2 different materials , because they have been vulcanized they are now one and the same material and d) I would have seen this a lot more often.
 

DirtyMike

Turbo Fluffer
Aug 8, 2005
14,437
994
My own world inside my head
yeah...i wasn't so sure that the glue was actually vulcanizing the tube...it's just acting as a simple adhesive.
Well, it depends on the patch actually, most proper patches, IE that use glue, are chemically vulcanizing, making a permanent repair. But it this case we need to seperate the worlds of automotive and cycling. First off In automotive, Patching a tire... NOT PLUGGING, is a permanent repair. where as a Bicycle, it might be permanent. Now here is why, CLEANLYNESS. Properly patching a car tire starts with a pneumatic buffer, then a cleaning fluid, and a tool to clean the tire, then an even layer of glue that must DRY COMPLETLY before applying the patch, then you take a tool, called a tire stitcher, and press the patch into the tire where it fully vulcanizes.

Bike tire..... doesnt get properly buffed, isnt normally clean enough, and doesnt get pressed together properly.





As for the original post, I would venture to say that this was caused by, belive it or not, too much glue in the first place. leaves an uneven surface and your glue doesnt quite dry all the way when you put the latch on, allowing it to peel.
 

DirtyMike

Turbo Fluffer
Aug 8, 2005
14,437
994
My own world inside my head
Oh, and for the record, I only run a patched road bike tube long enough to make it home. Tubes are cheap enough that I dont worry about it. But I do worry about having problems with a patch failing during a ride...... So its worth it to just throw a new tube in for me anyways
 

DRB

unemployed bum
Oct 24, 2002
15,242
0
Watchin' you. Writing it all down.
Maybe you suck at patching tubes. Maybe your car is actually a microwave oven in disguise that is used by folks from an alternate universe. Maybe the patch wasn't actually a patch but a heat sensitive valve.
 

Changleen

Paranoid Member
Jan 9, 2004
12,660
1,429
Hypernormality
Yeah it is important to prep the area to be patched really well (clean), use only a tiny amount of vulcanising solution spread fine and even, and wait for it to go off properly before applying the patch and a bunch of pressure.

Wait, Are we really discussing this?
 
...CLEANLYNESS. Properly patching a car tire starts with a pneumatic buffer, then a cleaning fluid, and a tool to clean the tire, then an even layer of glue that must DRY COMPLETLY before applying the patch, then you take a tool, called a tire stitcher, and press the patch into the tire where it fully vulcanizes.

Bike tire..... doesnt get properly buffed, isnt normally clean enough, and doesnt get pressed together properly...
I spend rather a lot of time buffing a tube prior to patch, stretch the tube prior to and during patching, and use the edge of a tire iron as a stitcher. The major problem I encounter is mould ridges on the tube, which are hard to buff properly.

The patches are usually pretty reliable.

I don't like the big cans of adhesive because it loses solvent over time and then the patches don't adhere properly. I suspect that this may be splat's problem.
 

DirtyMike

Turbo Fluffer
Aug 8, 2005
14,437
994
My own world inside my head
I spend rather a lot of time buffing a tube prior to patch, stretch the tube prior to and during patching, and use the edge of a tire iron as a stitcher. The major problem I encounter is mould ridges on the tube, which are hard to buff properly.

The patches are usually pretty reliable.

I don't like the big cans of adhesive because it loses solvent over time and then the patches don't adhere properly. I suspect that this may be splat's problem.
Thats an excellent point, patch glues have a shelf life, they only last for so long once you open them.

Just out of curiousity, where is everyone who buys 50 plus patches at a time riding that they need that many? Maybe its time for some flat prevention products.
 
Thats an excellent point, patch glues have a shelf life, they only last for so long once you open them.

Just out of curiousity, where is everyone who buys 50 plus patches at a time riding that they need that many? Maybe its time for some flat prevention products.
I s'pect that they're just being cheap. The tube goo is probably just fine for desert riding where you have goatheads and thorns, but it's pain in the ass overkill for east coast riding.
 

DirtyMike

Turbo Fluffer
Aug 8, 2005
14,437
994
My own world inside my head
I s'pect that they're just being cheap. The tube goo is probably just fine for desert riding where you have goatheads and thorns, but it's pain in the ass overkill for east coast riding.
Yeah I used to get flats on teh Mtn bike all the friggin time, but for abouyt 8 years now I have been running 3 oz slime front and rear and havent had an unexpected flat since. 6oz total added, I can handle that.

The road bike on the other hand, I just try to stay out of the gutter, havent had a flat for a while, aside from a full blown tube failure a couple months back. Also I dont run UL tubes either unless I am competing, I just stick with standard tubes, proper tire pressure every ride, some spare tubes and co2's in the seatbag and life is happy for me.