Quantcast

Why should you go to a bike shop?

Discussion in 'Downhill & Freeride' started by csermonet, Mar 6, 2013.

  1. csermonet

    csermonet Monkey

    Rep/Likes:
    8 / 121
    Joined:
    Mar 5, 2010
    Messages:
    936
    I've been riding for 10+ years and have always been an advocate of supporting my local bike shop. Not for everything obviously, I wouldn't pay for them to install my brake pads, tubes, chains, handlebars, basic stuff that anyone who can turn a allen key can do. But I never had any problem getting them to true my wheels, bleed brakes, fork service, some of the more involved stuff. The past 6-8 months I have done a complete 180 and won't step foot in that forsaken place EVER again. Ok maybe not ever, but if I never go there again I will not be disappointed.

    I have had several bad experiences I'd like to share and see if people have had similar problems, and see what everyone's opinions are on going to your LBS. Maybe can help me or some other people out there.

    Living in Georgia, there are many bike shops but when you take anything with more than 130mm of travel in they look at it like its an alien. A brand new one opened up in a super convenient location, and was owned by a youngish(low to mid 30's) guy who I had seen riding before. Decent skills, knew he had a bike maintenance business beforehand that he would run out of his truck at various local races. Talking to him come to find out he "worked at Yeti 5 years" and was a "certified Fox tech". Upon receiving a new bike that had a Fox fork(I had done basic service on my Rock Shox), I took the bike to him for him to glance over and do a basic service on the fork since I didn't know the history of it. Ended up doing seals and oil change for $80, no big deal at the time. Upon picking the bike up I said that I had seen the new e13 LG1 pedals and wanted them, he informed me they wouldnt be out for a few more weeks. Well, a few weeks later I get a call saying my pedals had arrived, I was baffled because I did not ask them to order any pedals for me, simply said that I had seen them and had lusted for them. No big deal, I thought, I was honestly planning on getting them. Ended up having to pay $150 for them, absolutely ludicrous since I can get them online all day for closer to $100. Was pretty pissed but whatever. Figured I would learn to do the service on my fork since I did on my old Rock Shox, bought some oil, have been doing it for months now. But the first time I serviced it after the "certified Fox tech", I found that one of the fork nuts on the bottom was so loose that I removed it by hand. The bastard even put a bicycle tube over my spring to stop the rattle. Effectively limiting my travel by 1.5" from all the "bunching-up" the tube did. I knew that this was an inadequate way to solve the problem before I even took it to him, I did much research on the 40 before I received it and knew the proper way to solve the problem without limiting the travel was to use a longer piece of shrink wrap. Still, this didn't deter me from going. I mentioned in passing in another conversation that I would like to get an LG1 guide to replace my SRS one day. Low and behold, I get a call a week later saying my $180 chain guide had arrived. Which I didn't ask for. Ended up breaking my collar bone a few days after that phone call, and got numerous phone calls asking when I would purchase the guide. Haven't been back since. Even my mates have had issues. My friend destroyed his front wheel, the hub was fine he just needed a new rim laced up. He ended up going with a ex500 and required new spokes. He ended up paying $250 for the rim, spokes, and lacing. He just ordered a Hope Pro2 Evo rear hub, laced to ex500 off CRC's custom wheel builder, $315.

    So all in all, our LBS has tainted our opinion of them. The one shop that knows a thing or two about single rings, chain guides, and generally aggressive offroad riding has gouged us. He sells the **** out of full carbon yeti's with full xtr builds for these mid 40 aged men to hang on the back of their Porsche Cayenne. We are young kids(24) who work hard for their money. We don't wont to blow the little bit of money we work so hard for on parts that can be bought consistently for %20-%50 online. My mate, who purchased an LG1 guide and ring for his SB66, and had it installed by the shop($300), and called him to ask what cage length derailleur he should get. He told him that he was ordering it off the internet, and that he would have the shop install it for him. The shop went on to tell him that he doesn't have any advice for someone who purchases parts online and doesn't support the local shop. Wasn't it enough that he was going to get him to install it? Wasn't it enough that he paid 300 ****ing dollars to get a ring and guide and have it installed? There are numerous other little nuances and situations that have occurred that have turned us away.


    I've now got a wheel stand, brake bleed kit, all the materials and tools needed to do fork service, everything. There is literally nothing I need to go for a bike shop for. I will pop in to buy the common item I need in a pinch, tubes, chain possibly, shifter cables, etc. Otherwise I don't need them or want them. I have a good supply of expendable parts, have all the necessary lubes, oils, grease, etc. I can speak for myself in saying that I will never use a local bike shop for anything more than buying a common part for the convenience.

    Rant over haha
     
    #1 -   Mar 6, 2013
    Last edited: Mar 6, 2013

    Please register to disable this ad.

  2. cecil

    cecil Turbo Monkey

    Rep/Likes:
    53 / 1,158
    Joined:
    Jun 3, 2008
    Messages:
    1,787
    Location:
    with the voices in my head
    No rant here......my lbs would say things were on back order or no longer available then I would buy on line and have him install parts on bike. They went out of business 2 years ago basically poor customer service. It happens in every industry
     
    #2 -   Mar 6, 2013
  3. bdamschen

    bdamschen Turbo Monkey

    Rep/Likes:
    7 / 36
    Joined:
    Nov 28, 2005
    Messages:
    3,316
    Location:
    Spreckels, CA
    Sounds like a crappy bike shop. You should find another if for nothing other than last minute parts or tools.

    I can't build a wheel to save my life and the local shop here has a guy who is awesome at building wheels. Other than little stuff that's all I really use the shop for and they're still friendly and helpful. I'm impressed with my local shop even though I do most of the work myself.
     
    #3 -   Mar 6, 2013
  4. csermonet

    csermonet Monkey

    Rep/Likes:
    8 / 121
    Joined:
    Mar 5, 2010
    Messages:
    936
    I rather enjoy working on my bike now, finding myself performing maintenance more often than necessary. At first I was intimidated by the more involved tasks, like fork maintenance, bearing maintenance, etc. When I got a bike stand everything changed for me, I was much more willing to work on my own bike. And when I started doing the stuff I was intimidated by, I found out it's just the same as working on our cars, house, anything. That once you dive in, most of the time its not as difficult as you anticipated.

    I can totally understand going there if I was a olderish age, had money, working full time with a family and didn't have the time or patience to do it myself.

    If this thread accomplishes anything other than providing me with an outlet to vent my frustrations, I hope that it would inspire some other, maybe beginner monkeys to stop wasting their hard earned pennies at the shop and invest in a stand, tools, and misc. lubes/greases/oils and to start learning yourself. It not only saves money and can actually be "fun" instead of a chore, but theres a good feeling knowing that you understand all the ins-n-outs of your two wheeled machine and there is nothing you need to pay someone else to do.

    bdamschen - I do use another shop in the general vicinity, but only for trivial things like Udi stated. Tubes, chain lube, presta to schrader adaptor, etc. I do admit that I will take my wheels to a shop occasionally. I did get a truing stand, and have tried my hand at it but I'm not that good. I find if I stay on top of checking for loose spokes, my wheels stay true much longer. However I just bought a new wheel set, and they are in perfect condition but I would like to get some lighter rims and butted spokes and before I do, I will definitely be doing my research and watching videos on wheel building as I intend to do it myself. At the least, I could get them semi straight and laced up and have the shop "true" them, and avoid a full lacing fee.
     
    #4 -   Mar 6, 2013
    Last edited: Mar 6, 2013
  5. OGRipper

    OGRipper Turbo Monkey

    Rep/Likes:
    7 / 106
    Joined:
    Feb 3, 2004
    Messages:
    9,683
    Location:
    NORCAL is the hizzle
    The answer to your question is, you probably shouldn't.

    Bike shops do not exist for broke 24 year old downhill racers. (Except those that work there.)
     
    #5 -   Mar 6, 2013
  6. xy9ine

    xy9ine Turbo Monkey

    Rep/Likes:
    4 / 127
    Joined:
    Mar 22, 2004
    Messages:
    2,717
    Location:
    vancouver eastside
    pretty much. random sundries. as much as i like to support local business, at ~2x the price on parts, it's not something i'm willing to (or can afford to) do out of charity. that said, we tech savy, self wrenching nerds aren't the bread and butter of the average bike shop, so i'm sure they get by just fine w/o us. team crc!
     
    #6 -   Mar 6, 2013
  7. Routier07

    Routier07 Monkey

    Rep/Likes:
    0 / 0
    Joined:
    Mar 14, 2009
    Messages:
    259
    Right.

    I love the misconception that most bike shops are fvcking people out of $$$. Alot of shops don't want to make themselves look like they're marking everything up 20-30% over internet prices, in 99% of cases it has to do with the distributor. Shimano is a prime example, Prices on CRC are so close to shops cost, if there is a local demand, there is no choice to make it look like there's a 20-30% markup. What is a shop supposed to do??? Make $10 profit off a XTR rear derailleur to stay "competitive" with teh internetz, it is exactly what is is. P&A companies need to control pricing across the board on the internet side of things so shops don't look like they're purposely fvcking with people, until then...

    My recommendation, is bring up whatever issue with either the manager or owner, if they care about their business, they'll listen and absorb your constructive critism. However, ranting about it on a bike forum does and will do nothing about the situation. This **** has been played out on forums since there has been forums.

    G'day.
     
    #7 -   Mar 6, 2013
  8. csermonet

    csermonet Monkey

    Rep/Likes:
    8 / 121
    Joined:
    Mar 5, 2010
    Messages:
    936
    Lol not a racer. Although I have before, would be willing to do more in the future. Just a "hobby", pretty serious hobbyist I suppose.

    I have talked to some shop employees and I'm thoroughly envious of the prices they get to enjoy
     
    #8 -   Mar 6, 2013
  9. csermonet

    csermonet Monkey

    Rep/Likes:
    8 / 121
    Joined:
    Mar 5, 2010
    Messages:
    936

    The guy I am referring to having all the interaction with, and the one working on my bike, is the owner of the shop. The same guy that "worked at Yeti 5 years" and is a "certified Fox tech". Anyone who rides an sb66 and wears a Fox hat can claim that. It only cost my mate 25% more to get a WHOLE NEW REAR WHEEL LACED UP WITH A HOPE PRO 2 EVO than to get his front hub re-laced with new spokes and rim. And that is with international shipping to the United States. That is absurdity. And then months later, after spending who knows how much money at this guys shop, he tells my friend "I don't have any advice for someone who buys off the internet and doesn't support your LBS" Are you kidding me? Thats not a way to keep customers. First and foremost the guy has come across as having an attitude problem, if the exorbitant prices and shop fees weren't enough to keep us away his ****ty attitude sealed the deal.

    And I am not hating on all bike shops, I may have not made that clear but there is no need to make that arrogant assumption. This is with one particular shop, although I have experienced issues and buyers remorse at all shops. I have a few other shops around me that may not entirely grasp gravity disciplines, but they have been super nice and haven't ordered parts for me that I didn't ask for. Heck, they don't even pressure me to buy products and services that I don't need or want. So when I do need the odd tube or whatever, I know I won't be going to the shop previously mentioned.
     
    #9 -   Mar 6, 2013
    Last edited: Mar 6, 2013
  10. demo 9

    demo 9 Turbo Monkey

    Rep/Likes:
    9 / 45
    Joined:
    Jan 31, 2007
    Messages:
    5,911
    Location:
    north jersey
    you shouldnt /thread
     
  11. EVRAC

    EVRAC Monkey

    Rep/Likes:
    1 / 9
    Joined:
    Jun 21, 2004
    Messages:
    756
    Location:
    Port Coquitlam, B.C., Canada
  12. kidwoo

    kidwoo Celebrating No-Pants Day

    Rep/Likes:
    161 / 1,569
    Joined:
    Aug 25, 2003
    Messages:
    21,808
    Location:
    In my pants
    But a good shop is priceless. Because every so often......every once in a while, you find some random dude who loves bikes, rides them fast, and knows all kinds of random **** about the inner workings or your suspension or some whacked setup trick that you would have never thought of.

    The idea that EVERY bike shop has one of those guys is ludicrous though. You've just got to find them. But if you know how to work on things and build better wheels than your nearest shop, then they absolutely shouldn't be 'your' shop.
     
    #12 -   Mar 6, 2013
    Last edited: Mar 6, 2013
  13. canadmos

    canadmos Cake Tease

    Rep/Likes:
    249 / 4,780
    Joined:
    May 29, 2011
    Messages:
    9,237
    Location:
    Canaderp
    Unless you are a road biker, around here most bike shops are useless. Unless I'm just looking for a tube, chain or cables/housing, they'll more than likely have to order in any parts. At the biggest store in my town, I've never seen a wire bead tire on the shop floor. All foldable tires and usually in the pencil thin road bike style.

    I still give all bike shops respect though. They are helping to feed our sport with new people and are essential when you need an emergency repair. Some shop owners and employees are pretty cool too, even if they are roadies. :D
     
  14. demo 9

    demo 9 Turbo Monkey

    Rep/Likes:
    9 / 45
    Joined:
    Jan 31, 2007
    Messages:
    5,911
    Location:
    north jersey
    I went into my LBS lookin for a 26 inch XC tire, just so happend that they had zero 26 inch tires, except 1 hookworm from the back, but they did have 15k road bikes on the floor, about 25 of them. (literally) What am i missing here?


    *did have a few 29r tires
     
  15. csermonet

    csermonet Monkey

    Rep/Likes:
    8 / 121
    Joined:
    Mar 5, 2010
    Messages:
    936
    Same situation here, as in its all road biking. There are some shops near the trails we ride that stock some XC stuff, some high end too, but everything is meant for little flyweight short travel bikes. They wouldn't know how to install a chainguide, probably never seen one. Said bike shop doesn't stock big bike parts, but has plenty of experience with them(so they claim).

    Haven't written shops off as a whole, the one shop I use to true my wheels while I am still learning, they are more of a "family" oriented bike shop with road bikes, lower end general purpose mountain bikes etc. They are nice as can be, a friend that rides DH with me used to work there years ago too, but the owners and guys that work there have no clue about anything offroad related and they are awesome to deal with when I need to go in there. They have always done a good job on my wheels, one time ran into a snag and instead of the $15 a wheel price they only charged me for one wheel and instead of the $30 for a brake bleed(now done by me) they charged me $15. The incident that occurred was not an issue because of the way they treated me and now I don't hesitate to go back if I have to. I'll even call them if i need some generic part like cable routing stuff, cassette spacers etc cause I would rather give them the business before I check elsewhere or have to resort to a online store
     
  16. csermonet

    csermonet Monkey

    Rep/Likes:
    8 / 121
    Joined:
    Mar 5, 2010
    Messages:
    936
    Craziness. The rising popularity of AM riding, which is considered a "big bike" by most of the biking community and industry, its insane that more local shops aren't carrying more stuff that caters to it. I guess the majority of the income is still not there to justify carrying it. The forums and blogs would lead you to believe everyone and their mother is buying 160mm 26 trail bikes and "long travel" 650b and 29r's. The one shop that caters more towards it here is the smallest(inventory=nonexistant) and the owner sucks. I fully dont expect to be able to go buy a DH bike at a shop here in metro Atlanta(although I have actually before). Our riding community down here, particularly trail riding, is growing massively and the fact that no one appears to be taking full advantage of it is mind boggling. You should see my local DH/FR spot thats on city land. Recently the average amount of people riding a 7inch+ bike on a Saturday went from 5/6, to over 30 a few weeks ago, and 13-15 the weeks following. The DH section alone went from 3 trails, to 8 currently, more in the planning. From having our stuff torn down by the local riding club, to paying for our materials, having dirt delivered, full support. A full beginner and expert dirt jump line too, and a quality pumptrack. Its pretty awesome to be able to finally have a quality, progressive, legal spot to ride.
     
  17. weedkilla

    weedkilla Monkey

    Rep/Likes:
    0 / 10
    Joined:
    Jul 6, 2008
    Messages:
    362
    I learned to wrench by scabbing from the bin behind the local bikeshop - what they threw out was frequently an upgrade for me when I was at uni. This predates internet shopping, was in the early days of MTBing and everything broke - all the f***ing time! And with canti brakes you learned to true and build wheels or you didn't ride.

    Over the years I grew a great deal of respect for the truly great LBS, and they are about 1 in 20 where I live, but in the last couple of years I have really started to lose the love for even the great LBS. I can find out more about which product I should choose to suit my needs, and buy it cheaper and never leave my couch. And as the bikeshops have reduced their inventory of high end product because they cant compete with net prices I can get stuff landed quicker than they can get it freighted in.
    So, internet shopping - quicker, cheaper easier - but no free cup of coffee, warranty is a pain, and one more local business is another customer closer to closing their doors and a few more people are out of work.

    I genuinely believe the LBS model will need to change, and that change will need to include internet shoppers. I expect you'll see higher workshop rates as they adjust to not making half their profit on markup and half on labour. But its change or become the next blacksmiths.......
     
  18. Jim Mac

    Jim Mac MAKE ENDURO GREAT AGAIN

    Rep/Likes:
    32 / 281
    Joined:
    May 21, 2004
    Messages:
    6,364
    Location:
    the middle east of NY
    I think that the bike shop experience is very different for people into DH than it is the average customer. People into DH by nature (or need) tend to know more about bike maintenance because we have to have those skills at some level. The average Jane/Joe just wants to ride their hybrid/road bike/entry level mtb and leave it at that. In this way, this bike shop stuff here may be an 'apples to oranges' comparison.
     
  19. ICEBALL585

    ICEBALL585 Bacontard

    Rep/Likes:
    85 / 730
    Joined:
    Sep 8, 2009
    Messages:
    6,230
    Location:
    .:585:.
    All the bike shops around here are geared toward roadies or novice mtn bikers. They all usually have one rack of mtn bike stuff but the clothing is about 3-5yrs old and still at full price.
     
  20. bizutch

    bizutch Delicate CUSTOM flower

    Rep/Likes:
    4 / 8
    Joined:
    Dec 11, 2001
    Messages:
    15,921
    Location:
    Over your shoulder whispering
    Holy crap...couldn't even read the first sentence, it was such a long post. Quit reading the thread and just hit quick reply to say so. :thumb:
     
  21. ZoRo

    ZoRo Turbo Monkey

    Rep/Likes:
    6 / 8
    Joined:
    Sep 28, 2004
    Messages:
    1,225
    Location:
    Montréal, PQ
    CRC ftw!!
     
  22. intensified

    intensified Monkey

    Rep/Likes:
    0 / 5
    Joined:
    Mar 31, 2004
    Messages:
    512
    Location:
    Canton,Ma

    agreed, short and sshweet is a thread, this thing starts out like soap on a rope ;)
     
  23. atrokz

    atrokz Turbo Monkey

    Rep/Likes:
    12 / 79
    Joined:
    Mar 14, 2002
    Messages:
    1,556
    Location:
    teedotohdot
    Former shop mechanic and cycling business owner here. Nowadays I visit shops that friends work at, or if I'm in dire straits for a part. Also for simple things that you'd want to try out, like saddles, etc.

    I can also see why people would buy complete bikes at a shop, as being able to go in and size it up makes a lot of sense.

    However, I cannot understand the grip people have with on-line ordering. I hear it everywhere, especially from shop owners. On another Canadian site the admin bashed CRC customers for being the end of the industry. Yea, ok there tonto.

    Bottom line is that they aren’t losing customers because of online retailing. They are losing them because of an antiquated business model, and the middle man (distribution networks). This is why they stick to road and lower end: because these customers aren’t always the most informed. Us DH’er are well aware of what parts cost on-line, and I’d say 90% of us do pretty much all the work ourselves. So why bother, unless your shop is helping you out?

    Also, when people state CRC is ‘bad’, are they forgetting that CRC runs a world cup race team? Last I checked, none of these shop owners complaining do anything close to supporting the ‘scene’ like CRC does aside from some rides now and then and sponsoring a few local riders and races. CRC supports a global team, provides product at nearly 50% less than shops carry it for, and have an in house brand filled with actual cyclists and ex-racers. I’d rather see WC racing survive than the local dj competition.... if that makes any sense.
     
    #23 -   Mar 7, 2013
    Last edited: Mar 7, 2013
  24. OGRipper

    OGRipper Turbo Monkey

    Rep/Likes:
    7 / 106
    Joined:
    Feb 3, 2004
    Messages:
    9,683
    Location:
    NORCAL is the hizzle
    The best shops also serve as a gathering/organization place for the local cycling community, including local trail advocacy and grassroots events. They provide an invaluable social function that is simply not served by online stores.

    But yeah probably too quaint and antiquated in the modern world. Enjoy getting the best deal for yourself and don't worry about it.
     
  25. atrokz

    atrokz Turbo Monkey

    Rep/Likes:
    12 / 79
    Joined:
    Mar 14, 2002
    Messages:
    1,556
    Location:
    teedotohdot
    That's true. And I think the GOOD shops see that value added reasoning, and atack it. We have Cycle Solutions and Sweet Petes here that has got my $ on quite a few occasions. They are great people, helpful, and I consider some of them friends. So it works out for them. The owners are doing quite well.

    But on the other hand, you have about 30 other little shops that never stock anything of use. Aren't exactly qualified mechanics, and still charge the msrp on everything. Those are the shops I'm refering to, and they are usualy the most vocal about online places like CRC.
     
  26. OGRipper

    OGRipper Turbo Monkey

    Rep/Likes:
    7 / 106
    Joined:
    Feb 3, 2004
    Messages:
    9,683
    Location:
    NORCAL is the hizzle
    ^^Agreed. People that have never experienced the benefits of a good shop will never get it. There are tons of reasons to support a good shop. Unfortunately, there are a lot of crappy shops out there. And this is why generalizations about "bike shops" are kind of silly.

    Anyway, shops have a special place in my heart because being a shop rat was pretty much the only option when I first became a bike nerd - mail order was barely a thing at that point, let alone the online stuff.
     
  27. canadmos

    canadmos Cake Tease

    Rep/Likes:
    249 / 4,780
    Joined:
    May 29, 2011
    Messages:
    9,237
    Location:
    Canaderp
    So I take it you're from Toronto? Cycle Solutions is pretty sweet. I don't go there too often, but they actually have product in their store that can be used for mountain biking. Quite rare around here.

    Another instance of a shop being useless, was about two years ago I was searching for a new cross country bike. I had decided on a Banshee and traveled to the only Bashee dealer listed on Banshee's website, that was located around here. Upon walking in and asking where any Banshee bikes were, the employee didn't even know they were a Banshee dealer haha. And they let me walk out of the store without so much as offering to look up a price or something similar...Though in his defense, all the store employees were quite busy fitting this verrrry attractive female for a road bike.

    And even taking CRC out of the equation, you know things are over priced when you can buy a part from out West, without free shipping, and still have it come well under the prices that you find around here.
     
    #27 -   Mar 7, 2013
    Last edited: Mar 7, 2013
  28. atrokz

    atrokz Turbo Monkey

    Rep/Likes:
    12 / 79
    Joined:
    Mar 14, 2002
    Messages:
    1,556
    Location:
    teedotohdot
    Yup. From the Teedotohdot
     
  29. ChrisRobin

    ChrisRobin Turbo Monkey

    Rep/Likes:
    5 / 55
    Joined:
    Jan 30, 2002
    Messages:
    2,990
    Location:
    Vancouver
    I've always like doing things online because the locals could never compete... especially with the CDN dollar being on par with the US dollar.

    Although, in the Vancouver area I realized Dunbar Cycles was nearby and they're very much into DH/AM (I think I saw XC and road bikes in there, didn't pay attention). They have a decent online shop and website, and they say they'll match any online price. Even if they were $5 more than online shops, it sure saves me the time and gas it takes to get to my US address in WA. So kudos to them and I'll continue going to them.

    Also found a good local shop in Bellingham...again with good online prices and great service and stock all the small Intense parts.
     
    #29 -   Mar 9, 2013
    Last edited: Mar 10, 2013
  30. syadasti

    syadasti i heart mac

    Rep/Likes:
    64 / 288
    Joined:
    Apr 15, 2002
    Messages:
    12,721
    Location:
    VT
    You'll save far more gas/the environment shopping online

     
    #30 -   Mar 9, 2013
    Last edited: Mar 9, 2013
  31. Huck Banzai

    Huck Banzai Turbo Monkey

    Rep/Likes:
    6 / 21
    Joined:
    May 8, 2005
    Messages:
    2,526
    Location:
    Transitory
    If you are your own wrench, without question NO ONE touches your bike with tools but you --

    then what makes a good bike shop?



    As per the 'Canexican dollar' being on par with the amerran - unit per unit, but not on value. Canucks pay a bunch more for whatever bike stuff than I do, regardless of where their dollar lies.
     
    #31 -   Mar 9, 2013
    Last edited: Mar 9, 2013
  32. EVRAC

    EVRAC Monkey

    Rep/Likes:
    1 / 9
    Joined:
    Jun 21, 2004
    Messages:
    756
    Location:
    Port Coquitlam, B.C., Canada
    Really impressed with the selection of dh gear at Dunbar cycles. When the new-style demo 8s came out they had like six framesets, all in red and black, all hanging in a row. Sick. Lots of nice parts as well, full tld lineup, including lots of armour.

    Have to commend them on their website as well.
     
  33. Lelandjt

    Lelandjt Turbo Monkey

    Rep/Likes:
    4 / 98
    Joined:
    Apr 4, 2008
    Messages:
    1,684
    Location:
    Breckenridge, CO/Lahaina,HI
    If you have a good bike shop nearby you already know why you should go there. If you don't that's too bad but not surprising cuz being a good shop owner or employee doesn't pay nearly enough to draw many of those people into the job and keep them around and the ones you do meet are making some sacrifices for the love of the sport. As for all the complaints about shops in this thread I generally agree. There's certainly plenty of lousy mechanics at lousy shops. It will always be hard to compete with the internet on prices but with smart business practices you can get pretty close and make the customer feel they're getting plenty of value for whatever extra it costs them to buy from you. And the inevitable parts sales you're bound to lose to internet deals: Definitely install them for normal labor charges and continue to treat the customer well in hopes of getting later purchases from them.
     
    #33 -   Mar 10, 2013
    Last edited: Mar 10, 2013
  34. boogenman

    boogenman Turbo Monkey

    Rep/Likes:
    2 / 114
    Joined:
    Nov 3, 2004
    Messages:
    3,416
    Location:
    BUFFALO
    This thread is making my head hurt.

    The guy that owns this shop sounds like he is a shady mechanic, that would keep me from going back. You can't complain about prices, the interwebz is always going to be a lower price but if you don't know what you are buying or how to,install it you are better off with your LBS.
     
  35. Sandwich

    Sandwich Pig my fish!
    Staff Member

    Rep/Likes:
    69 / 869
    Joined:
    May 23, 2002
    Messages:
    15,705
    Location:
    01776
    In a word, service.

    I just went to my not local bike shop yesterday, JRA cycles in medford. My Kali knee pad had broken, and I hadn't had any sort of an impact that would have caused it. It split right down the middle, and that's the kind of thing that you don't walk away from. I walked in, explained myself, and though the person waiting on me was initially going to call Kali and figure out what to do, another person walked over and told her to just give me another set. So, I walked out with a brand new set of pads, and they're going to send the old set back. They even let me pick up a smaller size as the larges were floppy on me.

    I paid retail for the pads there, as when I went in to see what they had, they had a HUGE selection and I got to try on multiple sizes of multiple brands. I'm glad I paid retail, because otherwise I would have had to send them back to Jenson/Etc, then wait for a return, and in all likelihood I'd be out $20 on shipping.

    They also carry a whole bunch of other stuff, direct mount stems, body armor, more Ibis Mojos than you can shake a stick at...even an intense 275. And their prices are pretty reasonable too.

    I think for the modern bike shop, it's all about finding a niche. There's the crazy hoarder guy's shop, the "we cater to everybody, just don't ask for help" shop, the ultra roadie shop, and now JRA is capturing the AM/DH rider shop. I still use other shops for service, crazy hoarder guy for shimano bearings, roadie shop for headset presses and spoke cutters, but it's nice to have someplace where people actually seem to speak the language.
     
  36. toowacky

    toowacky Monkey

    Rep/Likes:
    1 / 4
    Joined:
    Feb 20, 2010
    Messages:
    201
    Location:
    Pac NW
    Exactly. New riders to the sport probably are buying new complete bikes and what better way to get them to also know about the local advocacy/trail maint organization than via the LBS where they are making those purchases. Likewise, shops "sponsoring" trail build days via swag/transportation of riders via the shop van/etc. provides some great exposure for them to the local cycling community.

    I admittedly don't buy much from my LBS, but when I do, I am more inclined to support one of those local shops that was at the trail work day/supporting the race series/etc.

    And sometimes you just need a set of brake pads (or <insert component/apparel/etc. here>) before the ride... and I'll pay for that convenience of being able to walk in and get them... if you're lucky enough that they've got that CODE/Formula/Hope/Saint brake pads actually stocked.
     
  37. csermonet

    csermonet Monkey

    Rep/Likes:
    8 / 121
    Joined:
    Mar 5, 2010
    Messages:
    936
    Sounds like you got a good spot there. Unfortunately, there are no shops around here that cater to our segment. Can't find a wide handlebar, definitely not a direct mount stem, won't find any flat pedals(except commuter bike type stuff), long travel susp components, fuggedddaaaboutit, which I don't necessarily mind seeing as I can get all those sort of bits cheaper online. Plenty of "good" shops around here, with people who are enjoyable to deal with and shoot the **** when I make the rare appearance. Problem is they are a bit out of my way etc etc.
     
  38. boogenman

    boogenman Turbo Monkey

    Rep/Likes:
    2 / 114
    Joined:
    Nov 3, 2004
    Messages:
    3,416
    Location:
    BUFFALO
    So do something about it or stop whining like a litte bitch. Talk the owner or manager and work out a deal, learn to wrench on your own bike or open up your own shop, or get a job at a shop and become a manager. That's what I did and it was great for the time I did it.

    There are no good DH shops around here either but people get by. I wish there was a trials oriented shop close by but there is not.
     
  39. csermonet

    csermonet Monkey

    Rep/Likes:
    8 / 121
    Joined:
    Mar 5, 2010
    Messages:
    936
    Are you not grasping the concept of what I started this thread for? One of the first posts I made said that i stopped getting my bike worked on by ANY shop a long time ago, and have since invested large sums of money on bike related proprietary tools, truing stand, torque wrenches, oils, lubes, greases etc etc etc. Except for the occasional wheel true while i am still learning, I do not pay anyone to work on my bike. Simply put, since you apparently need it spelled out for you, I started this to have a place that people could share similar experiences and hopefully inspire others to wrench on their own bike. Again, those almost exact words were iterated earlier in the thread by yours truly. Hell, maybe even some shop owners will see this and use the "customer feedback" here to their advantage. So, now that we have covered the basics...Instead of whining like a little bitch about my opinions and posts, why don't you post something informative or useful?
     
    #39 -   Mar 11, 2013
    Last edited: Mar 11, 2013
  40. boogenman

    boogenman Turbo Monkey

    Rep/Likes:
    2 / 114
    Joined:
    Nov 3, 2004
    Messages:
    3,416
    Location:
    BUFFALO
    Most shop owners and managers don't have the time to hang out on forums to read stories about bad experiences at shops hundreds of miles from their shop.

    After reading your rant again my only other comment would be that the owner is a complete dick and idiot for ordering parts that you mentioned but never confirmed that you wanted.