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Young racer's guide to train like a pro...

Alloy

Monkey
Aug 13, 2004
289
0
thousand oaks, ca
..I wrote this thinking some of you young guys might be able to benefit from it. I know when I was starting racing it took me a long time to learn how to train most effectively. I was always looking to find out what the pros were doing, but most of it seemed pretty secret.

Some of my training methods are pretty unconventional, but if you race expert or even sport and start doing these methods to the T, you should have no problem at least winning a semi pro race. If you race pro you should be able to pick up at least one thing from this will make you faster.

Also know when I was a kid I used to suck at riding bikes… I’m pretty sure I was the worst in my group and we all sucked, I just sucked more. So there’s no natural talent here.

My regiment changed quite a bit over the years through lots of trial and error. Last year I was at the peak of my racing… here’s what I used to do to train.

Starting the training season (2 months before the race) every other day I would do a 9 mile cross country ride with all hills… no flat ground. It would take about an hour and half. This was done on a DH bike with the seat down and a 38 tooth chain (a bigger ring is better. One time all I had was a GT test bike with a 42 front ring, … I was a fcking steam engine after doing that for a few weeks.)

At the end of each climb I would sprint out the last minute. So total for the ride was 1.5 hours, 2 sprints, each about 1 minute maybe more, and one timed run on the downhill, that was about a 5 minute course. (Also note as a semi pro I thought doing longer rides might help more, I got the point where I would do a 3 hour cross country ride on my DH bike, …It didn’t help, it actually made me slower. I was training my body for more endurance rather than an all out anaerobic burst.)

Either immediately after that or after a 1 hour break, I would push up a DH trail and ride sections. Here I would work on cornering, braking and speed over rocks. Time spent was about 2 hours on a good day. (Side note: It was important after hitting a section perfect to never tell myself “that was pretty fast” …believing it’s never fast enough was the only way I could get faster riding by myself.)

On weekends I would do shuttle runs, with most of those runs being timed runs. 3 timed runs at least. I would try to do courses that were very similar to what I was going to be racing on.

After doing timed runs, I would do on the bike plyometrics. For these you bunny hop as high as you can and then try to repeat without letting the suspension go through a cycle. So bunny hop, land, compress the suspension, and then do it again before the suspension rebounds. Do it until you’re too tired to do any more, - repeat 3 to 5 times. If you do this correctly, you should be very sore the day after. …don’t do it before a race. Also try to mix it up, do hip bunny hops, switching left and right and then focus on landing smoothly. Bunny hop high, then use your muscle to land as smoothly as you can. …Doing this you’ll be able to pre jump and flat land anything without crashing.

As time got closer to the race I stopped the cross country rides and just focused on timed runs. I would do 5 timed runs on a course that was mostly pedaling and took 1. 45 to complete. At the end there was flat section with a double that forced me to sprint very hard or case the double. Mental images would be picturing beating arch nemesis Eric Carter, Rich Houseman, and others who stood above me on the podium.

On recovery days (every other day) I would do a 20 to 30 minute spin. For these I go slow enough not to feel any burn in my legs. Also I do wheelies and try to ride them for as long as I can, wheelies help work your balance and that’s important.

Also on off days I would do an upper body workout. This was pull ups immediately followed by push ups. For pull ups I would try to mix up different holds and do max sets. On a strict schedule with creatine supplements I could max out at 25. For push ups I would do them on my knuckles (This helps toughen your arms to prevent injuries.) Touching my chest on the ground and then going all the way up. If I was doing really really good I could max out at 40, usually it was 30. ...This excersize was done Monday, Wednesday, and Friday, regardless of how I felt.

For supplements starting a creatine cycle two or three weeks before the race made a big difference. I used the plain GNC black bottle with red label creatine.

Before the race, I give 2 days where I don’t do any hard training. Maybe spin… Also other guys may have more insight. Varying the days off prior to a race I haven’t really tested.





I’m not a top pro, but I know some very successful racers read this board, if they could share training regiments that would be awesome.

On the other hand I know some of you guys just show up and race and do nothing more. If you’re lucky enough to be able to do that, that’s awesome, but don’t post it here.

Also I’m starting this because you guys know as well as I do the level of US competition needs to get higher. I know some young racers are highly driven and willing work their ass off to win. They just need to know what to do.

Let me know your comments, and if you race pro and are or were serious some point, post up how you used to train!
 

yuroshek

Turbo Monkey
Jun 26, 2007
2,438
0
Arizona!
sounds good, i just dont know about the whole XC on a DH bike haha. i dont know if i could do that. but the rest sounds pretty good. altough im no pro but i do like to train and stay fit. i do the push up thing at least 2 times a day, yes im a nut haha.

today i worked on cutties and drifting for over an hour straight, no breaks. i went out by the road and worked on drifting the rear wheel out in the gravel. by the time i was done it looked like a nike comercial haha.

its good to do cross training as well, ex: ridin dirt bikes or 50's. bmx racin or DJ. rock climbing to build your whole upper body and legs.

good thread im interseted in seein what other people have to say.
 
Dec 11, 2007
43
0
wow such respect to u man! thats sick how you would post that and your style of training sounds great! its better to here that you can train on your bike rather then needing specific workout routine like in the gym or interval times... thanks for that!
 

ZHendo

Turbo Monkey
Oct 29, 2006
1,578
44
PNW
creatine, what about RAWBERRY, made with real lightning. joking aside i wouldn't touch that creatine ****, but otherwise the workout looks pretty good.
 

ArthurDH

Monkey
Apr 20, 2007
162
0
Italy
XC on a DH bike with low saddle will just f**k up your back in no time and you'll spend monthis not riding and doing rehab
don't mess with your health, just buy an XC bike and use harder gears... back pain is BAD i can assure you
 

Kevin

Turbo Monkey
and riding xc on a dh bike wont work half as well as a xc or roadbike.
good training means getting in good physical shape and getting overall skill on bike.
dirt jumping,bmx race track, mx or pitbikes or even park riding will make you better at dh then al the creatine in the word.
overall skill counts.
 

elRey

Turbo Monkey
that sounds like a solid routine except for the xc on a dh bike. i know that it would kill by back after less than a mile especially if they are good climbs. you don't wanna fvck with your back, for serious.
 

Pip3r

Turbo Monkey
Nov 20, 2001
1,112
0
Foxboro MA
How about some ideas for people that can't even ride XC untill a few weeks before the race season starts because the trails are too soaked...
 

- seb

Turbo Monkey
Apr 10, 2002
2,924
0
UK
and riding xc on a dh bike wont work half as well as a xc or roadbike.
That's questionalbe I think. Doing XC on an XC bike is potentially better because it makes everything easier, and as such keeps you more motivated.

In terms of fitness it shouldn't make any difference whether you're at 100% on a DH bike, or 100% on an XC bike. The difference though is that on the XC bike you'll be going 25% quicker, so it won't seem so sucky and you're more likely to carry on doing it.

HOWEVER, I would argue that IF you can make yourself do it, XC on the DH bike will be better. Why? Because it's another 5hours a week in the saddle of the bike you race on - what better way to get used to how it rides.

Can't beat doing all of your training on a DH bike in my mind, shame it makes everything such hard work and so slowwwwwwwwww ;)
 

Cant Climb

Turbo Monkey
May 9, 2004
2,687
10
Thanks for sharing that plan.......is very similair to what i do.

As for the xc on the DH, put a 34 tooth on the DH bike and jack the seat up. Only really sit down on the flat sections.....climbing is almost always standing so how is that hard on your back.....?.......its not....

When the trails are closed find a parking lot or a maze of sidewalk and work on cornering.....or maybe find a soccer field with blown off snow or froozen snow and trudge up and down it, beats sitting in the house or not riding at all......
 

ArthurDH

Monkey
Apr 20, 2007
162
0
Italy
Thanks for sharing that plan.......is very similair to what i do.

As for the xc on the DH, put a 34 tooth on the DH bike and jack the seat up. Only really sit down on the flat sections.....climbing is almost always standing so how is that hard on your back.....?.......its not....
false, it is

i tried that, and it hurted a lot... i'm sensible because of a lombar inflammation, so i can tell you: climbing while standing for longer than a few minutes WILL hurt your back
 

Cant Climb

Turbo Monkey
May 9, 2004
2,687
10
false, it is

i tried that, and it hurted a lot... i'm sensible because of a lombar inflammation, so i can tell you: climbing while standing for longer than a few minutes WILL hurt your back
Only problem i've ever had from it is dead legs......been doing it for 8-9 years now, the back is fine except for some tightness once in awhile.....

...back problems can be tricky and frustrating, wishing you a healthy back..:)
 

Transcend

My Nuts Are Flat
Apr 18, 2002
18,045
0
Towing the party line.
DH bikes have the wrong geometry for climbing (obviously). You can REALLY screw up your knees/back on some DH bikes as the seat ends up so far behind the BB when the seatpost is extended.
 

Cant Climb

Turbo Monkey
May 9, 2004
2,687
10
DH bikes have the wrong geometry for climbing (obviously). You can REALLY screw up your knees/back on some DH bikes as the seat ends up so far behind the BB when the seatpost is extended.
When your standing.....?

Standing and climbing is comfortable. Never really thought about why but i can stand and climb way more stuff on the DH than i can on the xc bike......98% of the DH runs i have done over the last 4years i have climbed the mountain on my DH bike and my knees and back 100% fine...

Maybe others have back issues.
Maybe climbing makes no sense on a DH bike.
I am only speaking from my own experience....
 

fred.r

Dwangus Bogans
May 9, 2006
843
0
Maybe you guys should get off the fact that theses guys do XC on their DH rigs and stick to the point of the thread... sharing your DH training routines.
I'm only an expert level racer, moving up next season to semi. Just started training for the first time in my life and I'm curious what other, more experienced riders do.
The routine I've been following the past month is;
Monday - Shuttle DH
Tuesday - Some core and upper body workouts, then repeated 1.5min sprints with cool downs inbetween
Weds - Non race weekend; 45min on my resistance trainer, alternating 5 min at 90+% max heart rate, and 10 min 75-85% MHR, then same upper body work out
Race weekend; sprints + normal routine
Thurs - Non race weekend: sprints and upper body again
Race weekend; rest
Fri - Non race weekend; resistance trainer and upper body
Race weekend; rest
Sat - Non race weekend:Spin lightly for 45 min (loosing weight purposes)
Race weekend; Practice
Sun- Non race weekend; Spin lightly again
Race weekend; Race...

This is for a combination of loosing weight, and training for DH. So far in the past month I've dropped 10lbs, and riding is becoming easier from a fitness standpoint.

I'm open to any suggestions.
 

Cant Climb

Turbo Monkey
May 9, 2004
2,687
10
You get more traction for climbing sitting down, even on a DH bike (which will have better traction ironically than a HT XC bike).
Agreed.
But really that is more traction than you'll ever need. With volumous knobby DH tires at low PSI you have gobs and gobs of traction. But seated climbing on DH bike makes no sense and you can get way more torque and burst by standing....therefore clearing tuff short steep sections. Alot of times i'll push up stuff i know that i could struggle up.....but just don't want to constantly toast my legs....

For moderate climbing just stand an relax. No hunching over, try have good healthy posture find a comfortable rhythm....very much how singlespeed riders climb....
 

Banshee Rider

Turbo Monkey
Jul 31, 2003
1,456
10
Honestly, that entire thing can be summed up with "Ride your bike, alot." which isn't exactly a bad thing... The best advice I've gotten in regards to training is from riding with adam craig and his words were close to the same, minus the xc rides on a dh bike? :disgust:

I personally just try to ride alot. Long xc rides, short xc rides, road rides, downhill runs, or just flat turns on the nearest dirt road; time on the bike is time well spent. I'll focus on techniques I feel need improvement, but ultimately its repetitive riding that tells me which changes I make actually work. However, I'd be lying if I said I didn't use spinning classes as anger-management in the winter.

Personally, I think confidence and mentality are the biggest stumbling blocks. I have the skill and fitness to race fast (as do many serious racers), but if I could believe in my ability to ride at 100% without making a mistake, then I don't think I'd be stuck in semi pro. Holding back mentally and being overly-cautious seems to hinder results more than poor training. I think many of the people who are busy counting grams would stop worrying if they overcame this stumbling block.
 

Jettj45

Monkey
Oct 20, 2005
671
3
Butthole of NC
I am not a pro I race expert but this is some information I got from a world cup level pro.

-After the race season is done get back into a weight lifting and some cardio base workout schedule. Do this for about 2-4 months depending on what about half your off season is.
--Some non-normal lifting pointers
---do curls on one leg with your eyes closed( trust me its really hard)
---instead of bench press use dumbbells and on an excerise ball(if it will hold the weight).
---Use dumbbell freeweights as much as you can.
- Once you get around 2 month from the first race, back off on the weight lifting. Get into some plyometric/isometric workouts ie: get in a crouched position and explode up, jumping as high as you can, do this until you fall over.
-BMX track sprints are also great for explosion workouts.
-During the actual race season the only training you should be doing is on your Downhill bike(assuming you have somewhere you can ride regurarly).
-He was also telling me some other World Cup level pros do Tai Chi and Yoga, mainly for balance.

I am currently in the transition from my weight lifting schedule to plyometrics. I guess ill find out after my first couple races whether or not all my hard work has paid off, I think it will.
 

skiforfree33

Monkey
Mar 15, 2007
229
0
colorado
This thread is sick! I really had no idea how to start training after ski season for DH. I train year around for Nordic skiing and this is my last year as a junior so when this year is dont i am going to focus only on DH training. I have a really good base from skiing and one of the work outs i was going to start doing when the trails dry is:

you do it on rolling terrain. you ride for about 30 mins easy to warm up. then for start the real work out of going for about 1 min. at 90- 95 % like race pace, then when the min is up you go about 50 -60 % of race pace for about 3-4 mins so that you recover but your still going hard. you do that about 5 to 6 times at lest once a week.
 

hardtailpride

Monkey
Jan 24, 2007
177
0
My current Triaing Plan:

Mon: Digging DJs and DJing ; Running
Tues: Skate Park and Bowl ; Pump Track
Wensday: Lower Body Strength Traing and ploymetrics; Light Jog
Thursday: Upper Body Strength Training and ploymetrics ; Light Jog
Friday: DJing and Running (Sprints Mostly)
Sat: Rest
Sun: Upper and Lower Body Strength Training

Soon to replacing all running with riding just waiting on funds for a cyclocross bike.

Personally I am seeing the most gain from the ploymetrics, has helped me in leaps in bounds in my ablility to explode out of berms and in sprints.

I found alot of great info at http://www.mtbstrengthcoach.com/ when planning out what strength trainging excercises to do. Also has a great list of ploymetric and body weight training.
 

ArthurDH

Monkey
Apr 20, 2007
162
0
Italy
DH on a DH bike with a low saddle will f**k up your back in no time as well. And ribs, and shoulders and wrists...
not really, because you change your position very often, and load and release different muscles at different times... riding XC instead keeps you in the same position with the same load for a long time, and thus is more dangerous for your back
 

ffonsok

Monkey
Dec 6, 2005
692
0
I can comment on the creatine. It works, but when you stop using it, you get really really tired and sluggish. I wouldn't recommend using it at all, but I might take it for a week up before the races this year, along with tons of water. It helps store water in your muscles and will keep you from getting musclesore on the course. You just have to drink tons of water with it, you can really **** yourself up if you go over the recommended dosage too.

All in all, it's probably best to keep it natural, but if you need that boost of energy without the jittery side effects of caffine, go for creatine.
 

Alloy

Monkey
Aug 13, 2004
289
0
thousand oaks, ca
A lot of good responses on this thread…

But I want to clear up the bad for your back thing.

So here's a little history. I originally fcked my back up big time from being stupid on construction jobs and then went overboard digging dirt jumps. I could hardly lift my right leg, and I had to walk very slowly. I couldn’t dirt jump at all… doing so would mean 2 weeks of serious pain. But I could ride DH, so that’s what I did.

I originally started riding DH cross country with a low seat because I was too broke to buy a high one. (The low seat forces you to stand up.) Guess what? It hurt like hell for the first two weeks, but it wasn’t pain from further compressing the disk in my back, it was because my body was hardening up. After those initial two weeks the pain lessened and the performance benefit I was getting was tremendous. All the sudden my fitness was approaching the level of our local pros! And I started to realize they weren’t gifted super humans and that anybody can do this. After 2 months of this, I entered my first expert level race and beat all the semi pros. This is on a course that is almost half pedaling. .

Riding XC on your DH bike is one of the hardest things you’ll ever do. But guess what? if you want to do well you need to do hard sht.

Fast forward to the more refined training regiment I posted. That was last year. I entered my first race after doing exactly that, here’s my results. I didn’t win, but I came closer to winning than I ever have before.

I can brag every once in while:biggrin:

...On second thought maybe it's not bragging because I only got second place
 

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Alloy

Monkey
Aug 13, 2004
289
0
thousand oaks, ca
How about some ideas for people that can't even ride XC untill a few weeks before the race season starts because the trails are too soaked...
At the last race someone told me most of top athletes do yoga. I know a semi pro guy who rides damn fast and doesn't have much time to train, but swears by bikrim yoga.

My buddy tried it for the first time last week and said it was the hardest thing he's ever done. "Twice everything in the room went completely white" he said.

If you can't ride give it a shot a let us know how it goes. From my experience anything that makes you feel like you're going to die is good training.
 

John P.

Turbo Monkey
Sep 24, 2001
1,170
0
Golden, CO
At the last race someone told me most of top athletes do yoga. I know a semi pro guy who rides damn fast and doesn't have much time to train, but swears by bikrim yoga.

My buddy tried it for the first time last week and said it was the hardest thing he's ever done. "Twice everything in the room went completely white" he said.

If you can't ride give it a shot a let us know how it goes. From my experience anything that makes you feel like you're going to die is good training.
I've done Bikram Yoga a few times, and it's definitely a tough workout. They crank the temperature in the room to 105 degrees Fahrenheit with 40% humidity, and you get into some pretty insanely strenuous poses. 5 minutes into it I'm usually sweating like Oprah in a room full of Oreos.

That being said, I think of Bikram as a nice supplement to a good strength training program rather than a substitute. For strength training, the best program I've seen is by James Wilson over at www.mtbstrengthcoach.com. He covers everything from nutrition to stretching to cardio to recovery and obviously strength training. Considering what some of you dudes drop on carbon handlebars and titanium springs, spending $100 on a high quality training program is nothing. The only downside is that James looks and sounds a little too much like Tobler for my comfort. ;)

But anyway, thanks for taking the time to start up this thread, Mark. I'll definitely be trying some of your techniques once the snow is less than armpit-deep around here.

Later,

--JP
 

Nagaredama

Turbo Monkey
Nov 15, 2004
1,596
2
Manhattan Beach, CA USA
Excellent thread!

I would add do compound exercises would be high beneficial.

--Burpees
--Thrusters
--Sumo High Deadlift
--Deadlift
--Overhead squat (excellent for balance)
--Pull ups kipping or strict
--Push ups
--Single overhead press
--Shovel gravel as fast as possible for 30 seconds

Isolating upper and lower body only detracts from coordination.
 

Total Heckler

Beer and Bike Enthusiast
Apr 28, 2005
8,083
18
Santa Cruz, CA
I think I need to start incorporating new things into my training.

As of right now it has been:
-Ride cyclocross 4 days a week (7+ miles each ride on my lunch at work) the ride has a lot of steep uphill some flats and some downhill. I recently toasted my rear wheel and now I am doing this on my 5 1/2 inch travel bike I will be racing light DH on this season.
-Ride DH at least once a week (5+ hours straight of hiking up trails and/or shuttling)
-Do push ups in the morning and before going to bed (25-50 each time)

Pretty basic, but I have cut quite a few pounds (since my shoulder surgery in September and starting to train/ride again in December).

I would love to get some more ideas on stuff to add to my training. Racing starts for me in March

EDIT - I also cut down on drinking. Limiting myself to weekends only. I am also eating more healthy. Little less meat.
 

bdamschen

Turbo Monkey
Nov 28, 2005
3,316
36
Spreckels, CA
Can someone go into more detail on the isometrics? It sounds like you're just spending 20 minutes a day trying to bunnyhop as high as you can, am I missing something there?
 

al-irl

Turbo Monkey
Dec 9, 2004
1,087
0
A, A
good tread.

At the moment i've kinda stepped up my training. Over the winter i was doing 2 xc night rides a week after work usually tuesday and thursday nights. About 1.5 to 2 hours long with the thursday one being a bit faster paced. No the season is getting closer and the dh bike has been dug out after a winter rest I'm back to 5 to 6 days a week training (depending on work and girlfriend dutys)

Monday 2hrs in the gym mainly weights and a bit of cv work mainly interval work and trying to hold a high heart rate (for me approx 175bpm) for about 5 mins taking it easy for 5 mins (140bpm aprox). I usually do that for about 20 mins at a time and then go do a circuit of the weight machines alternating between upperbody and lower body weights. Starting reps of 20 then 15 then 10 then 5 increasing the weight each time.

Tues night xc ride 1.5 to 2 hours with a group you need to have people to push yourself

Wed back in the gym for more of the same as monday

Thurs a faster xc ride with a smaller group, less hanging around and a faster pace than tues but about 1.5hrs to 2 hrs.

Friday my day off work so depending on what free time I have i try and go ride my dh bike for a few hours. Timed runs about 1min to 1.30 and pushing back up.

Sunday is a bit of a mix it can be a long trail ride 4-5hrs usually take in some propper dh style trails along the way. Or it could be shuttles or more of the same as Friday. It's usually based on having fun on my bike so it depends on which riding buddys are around and what they want to do.

I've found this works pretty well when I'm focused and motivated enough to stick with it. My problem is i get a bit bored after a few weeks so i end up taking a week off here and there and then starting again. The only thing I'm pretty much gaurenteed to do every week is the night xc rides. Its hard to fit training in with working and having a life outside of cycling.
 

TomBo

Monkey
Jan 13, 2004
301
0
Calgary,Alberta
3 Styles of chin ups, about 5 reps of style, 2 or 3 sets. 20 Pull ups (feet against ceiling, body held flat, then do like a chin up)
Moving my hand location (wide, narrow, ahead and behind, shoulders) and height of my feet off the ground (on a chair) 2 or 3 sets of push ups, +15 reps.
While hanging off chin up bar, bring your feet up to 90 deg "L" hold slowly, or knees to chest.
I keep it really random and try new things ever time, or I get so board.
Once maby twice a week.

5km of jogging with the odd sprint. Twice a week.

Balance board and hand spring thing while watching TV. Try to hold it closed every commercial non stop. As well as 15 lbs free weights in every direction I can think of till I can't move em any more. Or just holed them static for along as I can. Really help with forearm and hand pump, I found. My roommate alway gets a kick out of it and makes fun of me. Probably thinks I am totally retarded. I make a point of doing it at least once a week.

Just started to ride my new race bmx around, tons of fun (that focker moves). Great learning to be really smooth and precise on it.

Soon to start dirt biking, both MX and single track. Bmx track riding. Once there is less mud and frost.
I don't race, hence the lack of real training. Its just nice to bealbe to enjoy riding. I try to keep it fun and stretch lots.
 

ZHendo

Turbo Monkey
Oct 29, 2006
1,578
44
PNW
there's some serious training going on right about now for most of you. given that i'm running track i have all my cardio stuff taken care of. lifting is helpful, but i've found that you can do pretty much every exercise needed for riding without going to the gym, just have a set of adjustable weights at home. shoulders and abs seem to make the biggest difference for me, but i've lately found that just bunnyhopping around on the bmx for an hour or 2 can keep your back and shoulders in prime riding condition. here's the famous ab workout:

-50 crunches with feet on ground, every 5 lifting feet and back simultaneously and holding
-50 crunches with feet up, holding every 5
-50 crunches where you cross your elbow to the opposite knee, 50 for each side
-50 dead fish, lay on side and do side crunches, every 5 lifting feet and upper body simultaneously and holding, 50 for each side
-50 body extensions, no hands, start sitting and extend legs and lay back, hold legs and back just above the ground, and then return to starting position
-50 pregnant women, no hands again, sit and lift legs, then open and close your legs using your full range of motion
-50 full sit ups

do it every day before bed or just at a convenient time, my old track coach and football coach taught it to us, it works very very well.

edit: i also do knuckle push ups every night, pull ups a couple times a week, dips, maybe wall sits if i want to torture myself for no reason
 

Sandwich

Pig my fish!
Staff member
May 23, 2002
16,146
1,108
01776
HGH MANANA FLAVOR

Check out the ridemonkey fatbusters thread. Some good tips in here. I was worried this was a thread from that "your workout sucks, buy my Ebook" tool. I agree that riding the bike is key, but I feel like intervals and strength are important parts that are often left out. Don't forget to add balance and core conditioning as well.

I swim, run, and lift weights throughout the week.
 

Rover Nick

Monkey
Oct 17, 2006
280
0
not really, because you change your position very often, and load and release different muscles at different times... riding XC instead keeps you in the same position with the same load for a long time, and thus is more dangerous for your back

I'm going out on a limb here, but I think he was talking about crashing.

As for my training, it involves riding as much as possible, DH, XC... and then getting drunk for most of non race weekends. Its a wonder why I'm still in sport:lighten:
 

norbar

Turbo Monkey
Jun 7, 2007
9,645
380
Warsaw :/
creatine, what about RAWBERRY, made with real lightning. joking aside i wouldn't touch that creatine ****, but otherwise the workout looks pretty good.
That means you don't eat beef? Cuz there are small amouts of it there. Only real problem about it is that if your really dumbass you can injure your kidneys but it would take someone really stupid to do that.
 

Sandwich

Pig my fish!
Staff member
May 23, 2002
16,146
1,108
01776
creatine makes your muscles get big, but doesn't increase your strength. If you're going to the beach, take creatine. If beating your friends in bicep comparisons gives you boners, take creatine. Otherwise, CREATINE IS GARBAGE.

Take some protein if you really want to gain muscle mass. Otherwise, eat a healthy, balanced diet. Take a multi-vite to keep yourself healthy and balance inadequacies in what you eat. Get lots of sleep. Men's fitness recommends your body weight in grams of protein daily if you're doing lots of muscle work, but you can probably get away with quite a bit less.